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Old 01-15-2013, 11:38 PM   #81
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I think you are too smart to be a custodian, and too lazy to be anything else. You are young enough to think about what interests you and pursue it. Think of it as a hobby you get paid for...Anyway, I give it about 5 or 6 years and your wife is likely to change her view on having children. So you have about that much time to figure things out. Good luck to you and DW.
I could agree with the lazy thing. I just don't know what I would really like to do as a job. I've given it thought quite a few times as I have time to think while sweeping floors. I imagine once we've saved enough, I might consider other careers. For now I have security, good benefits and a job that is not stressful. I'd hate to leave such security for something I don't like.

Again, I don't hate my work, just don't like working in general. I definitely see that I'm much more intelligent than many coworkers. That is a slight frustration sometimes. Yet many of my friends outside of work are much smarter than myself.

I was never good at applying myself in school. Just found all of it uninteresting. The only thing I've had any strong focus on was finance. My personal finances that is. I tend to do things for a few weeks or months very intensely, then I don't bother with them for months or years at a time. Probably a bad quality, but why would you continue with something you lose interest with? I did go to school for electronics telecom, but got bored after 3 semesters and quit after the fourth. Haven't been back to school, just worked full time since I quit. Not sure what to say here... I wish I would have figured out what I wanted to do for a career, it just never happened. I feel like if I would have continued with school I would be a student forever, never finishing a program.

As far as the kids, she is completely opposed. I said I could go either way early on. At this point I'm a no. She never wanted kids, and still is opposed to it. We have discussed making this permanent.
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Life choices
Old 01-16-2013, 11:51 AM   #82
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Life choices

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Originally Posted by Too young to work View Post
We've been saving aggressively for about 5 years, and hope to semi-retire at age 37, and 38. With your help, we will hopefully pull this off.

And a final note. Working stinks. If work was only 2 or 3 days a week, for 5 or 6 hours I would not mind it at all. 40 hours is way too much time. Between the rest of chores and all of the stuff that life is, there is no space for that much work.

Feel free to ask questions! I'll post my other thread about moving shortly.
Hi there! I was like you, miserable at my job for the last three years of corporate life. But if you really mean what you said above, you should quit your job now. Why be miserable for 10 years so that you can save a little more? If you have been saving aggressively like you say, you should have a couple of years worth of living expenses saved up, at the very least. Why not jump into semi retirement now? You could take a job you like, that is close to home, has flexible hours... whatever it is. I enjoy teaching for example, and working in hospitality. I wouldn't mind teaching now that I am retired, it wouldn't feel like work. Yet it would cover my living expenses and I wouldn't have do tip into savings. Why not do that, even if you have to be semi retired for a bit longer until you can fully retire?
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Old 01-16-2013, 02:32 PM   #83
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I've been lurking here … I decided to finally sign up because I had some thoughts on moving to a new home, but I'll get into that in a different thread. …

I'm 27 and the wife is 28. We have no kids and are not planning on any. … We both work full time at the same job with good benefits. We've been saving aggressively for about 5 years, and hope to semi-retire at age 37, and 38. …

And a final note. Working stinks. If work was only 2 or 3 days a week, for 5 or 6 hours I would not mind it at all. 40 hours is way too much time.…

Feel free to ask questions! I'll post my other thread about moving shortly.
I skipped over three or so pages' worth of other people's comments. (I really wanted to get to writign and posting my response.) I happened to come across this thread minutes ago. It's very interesting.

One thing I'd like to know is how much money you and your wife make; how much for your home; and how much for your monthly expenses (food, shelter, clothes)? Basics, like a car, and entertainment? (I'm not seriously asking for you to answer. Just saying, if we were talking one on one, and I could be direct, this is some of what I'd ask you.)

I'm really getting to this: Being realistic is important. You may be generating well with income. (And that you have good benefits.) Are you handling that income well? Smartly? The investigating is absolutely smart. Having something in the bank (liquid) is too. It's like, one has their two arms and is not able to eight arms' worth of work. Are you and your wife really handling yourselves well that you wouldn't panic if something happened to either of you (which would otherwise cause other people to think their personal world may be coming to an end).

I am in my early-40s. I am in a situation for which I won't go too much into the details (because this thread is yours). I contributed substantially to non-liquid assets for a good ten years (though not as fully as I now wish that I had). But I had a situation pretty unique to others my age. I, too, do not have children. I didn't feel desire to have any. (Nothing against kids.) And everyone's situation (economic reality) is one that cannot be easily assumed as workable for other people and how they would live their lives. No one is doing your living for you. Likewise true that no one is doing my living for me.

Advice I would give is this: You and your wife should make yourselves realistic with how much you need to be living. Like as if one of you was retired right now. Does either of you have a job that would come with a pension? You should be aware of how much will be required of you to be living. (Pension or no pension being part of it. And you're both too young for normal Social Security retirment income.) And you should be willing to really lower your expectations, again concerning retirement, as to what you can actively do (since no longer actively working) in your spendings. A scaled back reality. But, while you're in your 20s (your wife as well) and saving aggressively, I would recommend (if it's doable) getting at least two types of insurances: one for life (and make it well into the hundreds-thousands) and one for longterm disability (in case). How much you two can afford to do these contributions … I don't know.

I also have this say (and it is advice): Keep going! Keep contibuting (both you and your wife) to investing in yourselves and your nest egg. I do know that when one is in his 20s, who is not loving the reality of working to make a living, the thoughts about getting out on early retirment are entertained. One can really think about the topic with much imagination. I can say to you to enjoy what you do aside from the work. That work is there for income and benefits which keep you and your wife in economic shape that is well enough to the point you can invest aggressively and think about these things … for down the road. Value good health both enjoyed by your wife and yourself. Have a good attitude, as much as can be mustered, and look forward on your journey to achieving personally (which also means economically), and then you'll find how much you (and your wife) evolve. Evolve in your thoughts and attitudes about your shared life. Life, after all, has the effect on human beings.
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Old 01-16-2013, 08:40 PM   #84
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We are comfortable in that if one of us was no longer able to work, we could live the same life while still putting a small amount away for retirement. We both will also have pensions. I am already vested, she has several years to go. From this I am already eligible for disability payments from the pension, and a good death benefit. We each have a 40k life insurance policy through work.

I feel we are smart with our money. We enjoy some, and save a lot. Certainly if one of us passed the lifestyle would change. Probably move to a smaller house or apartment. Definitely would look for another partner down the road. I guess I haven't investigated SS disability if it were to come to that. But as we could live off of one income, that would just be extra.

Would the life or disability insurance be good? Maybe. We don't feel it is necessary, and a small risk we are willing to take to save more. We are young and have a whole life ahead of us to adapt to the wrenches life may throw at us.
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Old 01-16-2013, 09:09 PM   #85
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We are comfortable in that if one of us was no longer able to work, we could live the same life while still putting a small amount away for retirement. We both will also have pensions. I am already vested, she has several years to go. From this I am already eligible for disability payments from the pension, and a good death benefit. We each have a 40k life insurance policy through work.
Your wife should definitely continue to work and become "vested."

A $40,000 life insurance policy isn't much. Not even with two of them. But I wouldn't ask you to pour every detail (I never asked you about your mortgage payments!) into this thread just to go over what's good and what's not-so-good.

Quote:
I feel we are smart with our money. We enjoy some, and save a lot. Certainly if one of us passed the lifestyle would change. Probably move to a smaller house or apartment. Definitely would look for another partner down the road. I guess I haven't investigated SS disability if it were to come to that. But as we could live off of one income, that would just be extra.
By saving a lot, are you referring to 401 (k) and/or IRAs (Traditional or Roth)? Other types of investments.

As for Social Security disability, that's for not being able to work any job. (You can look that up over the Internet. A search of "Social Security disability benefits" will yield resulting links which you take to Social Security Administration. You can do a quick read-up on what it is about.) But Social Security disability benefits wasn't what I was getting at. There is longterm disability insurance available, outside of one's employer, which one can purchase. (I don't know much on that issue. A friend of my relative's has it, is on Social Security disability benefits, and was a public employee when she became in need of this at the age of 32.)

Quote:
Would the life or disability insurance be good? Maybe. We don't feel it is necessary, and a small risk we are willing to take to save more. We are young and have a whole life ahead of us to adapt to the wrenches life may throw at us.
Well a lot of people don't buy any life insurance and probably much less buy longterm disability insurance. But your mention of continuous saving is smart. It's certainly not a disadvantage. And for you and your wife being this personally (and economically) successful, and to not to be spending more than one what one or you both earn, is also an advantage. There aren't too many people in their 20s who handle themselves as you mention. There are a lot of people who cannot do this, let alone while in one's 20s. That is good for you and good for your wife.
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Old 01-16-2013, 10:00 PM   #86
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We own our house outright. So no mortgage to worry about. SS disability covers not being able to work at all, what else would I need? If I was injured that I couldn't walk, I would certainly find a job that could accommodate that.

By saving I mean we each contribute to our pension, max out 403bs one Roth one traditional, and max both of our IRAs. We currently spend what we bring in so our liquid assets don't change, but we are putting away all of that money towards retirement. We also have 1.5 years of living expenses in a 1% checking account, and have a few months worth of stocks which could be sold in an emergency beyond that. Our Roth IRAs are going to be eligible for withdraw of contributions without penalty this year also, not that I intend to touch them.

We have in the low 200s in retirement accounts, plus pension values. All together with our house and various accounts we are right on the verge of 500k total assets. Soon to be half millionaires!
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Old 01-16-2013, 10:08 PM   #87
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We own our house outright. So no mortgage to worry about. SS disability covers not being able to work at all, what else would I need? If I was injured that I couldn't walk, I would certainly find a job that could accommodate that.

By saving I mean we each contribute to our pension, max out 403bs one Roth one traditional, and max both of our IRAs. We currently spend what we bring in so our liquid assets don't change, but we are putting away all of that money towards retirement. We also have 1.5 years of living expenses in a 1% checking account, and have a few months worth of stocks which could be sold in an emergency beyond that. Our Roth IRAs are going to be eligible for withdraw of contributions without penalty this year also, not that I intend to touch them.

We have in the low 200s in retirement accounts, plus pension values. All together with our house and various accounts we are right on the verge of 500k total assets. Soon to be half millionaires!
I can't say what to do career wise. I won't say what to do, period. I would like to say, "Good for you. Good for you wife. Good for the both of you."

I think a lot of other people addressed your other concerns, about general happiness and/or satisfaction, but I will say this: There is no decision of big personal change which is, ahead of time, guaranteed to pan out. That life isn't free of risks of this kind or that kind. I really do like that your wife and you own your house outright. That means a hell of a lot! Since you were mentioning ... not for the next 10 years. I'd say, right now, continuing to sock away substantial savings is ideal. A combination of investments and liquid assets from your banking.
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Old 01-16-2013, 10:16 PM   #88
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I can't say what to do career wise. I won't say what to do, period. I would like to say, "Good for you. Good for you wife. Good for the both of you."

I think a lot of other people addressed your other concerns, about general happiness and/or satisfaction, but I will say this: There is no decision of big personal change which is, ahead of time, guaranteed to pan out. That life isn't free of risks of this kind or that kind. I really do like that your wife and you own your house outright. That means a hell of a lot! Since you were mentioning ... not for the next 10 years. I'd say, right now, continuing to sock away substantial savings is ideal. A combination of investments and liquid assets from your banking.
Thanks for all your kind words and input. And same to everyone else who has commented. I look forward to the rest of my life here with all of you! It can be very lonely when you don't know anyone else who cares about retirement or their future. It's nice to share ideas with like minded people.
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Old 01-17-2013, 02:52 AM   #89
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Hi, I've only been lurking for about 6 months. In my research to find out more about early retirement I found a website called financial mentor. There's lots of useful information there including some information on happiness. That was really helpful to me as I was feeling so burnt out and desperate. From that I found Byron Katie, and by following "the work" a little I am feeling much more positive. I had been working full time for 26 years (generally more than a 40 hour week). I halved my hours 20 months ago and it really made no difference to how I felt or my energy levels. Since finding the above 2 I have felt so much better, I could probably cope with a few more hours at work but as I can afford it as I am I will continue as I am until I can prove to / persuade my husband I can afford to retire. I think if he had let me retire 6 months ago before I did all of my research I would still be just as miserable.
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Old 01-17-2013, 06:31 PM   #90
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I could agree with the lazy thing. I just don't know what I would really like to do as a job. I've given it thought quite a few times as I have time to think while sweeping floors. I imagine once we've saved enough, I might consider other careers. For now I have security, good benefits and a job that is not stressful. I'd hate to leave such security for something I don't like.

Again, I don't hate my work, just don't like working in general. I definitely see that I'm much more intelligent than many coworkers. That is a slight frustration sometimes. Yet many of my friends outside of work are much smarter than myself.

I was never good at applying myself in school. Just found all of it uninteresting. The only thing I've had any strong focus on was finance. My personal finances that is. I tend to do things for a few weeks or months very intensely, then I don't bother with them for months or years at a time. Probably a bad quality, but why would you continue with something you lose interest with? I did go to school for electronics telecom, but got bored after 3 semesters and quit after the fourth. Haven't been back to school, just worked full time since I quit. Not sure what to say here... I wish I would have figured out what I wanted to do for a career, it just never happened. I feel like if I would have continued with school I would be a student forever, never finishing a program.

As far as the kids, she is completely opposed. I said I could go either way early on. At this point I'm a no. She never wanted kids, and still is opposed to it. We have discussed making this permanent.
You may have ADD. My 11 year old daughter is smart as whip but can't focus on anything she does not find interesting. She will draw, cook and paint all day but hates academics except Science. I worry about her everyday and wonder if she will ever go to college and will she ever be comfortable financially.
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Old 01-17-2013, 07:53 PM   #91
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I honestly thought I might have ADD. Just thought maybe I was hard on myself though. At what point is it a problem vs a personality? And do I want to take pills to correct it? Maybe seeing a doc wouldn't be a horrible thing. Problem is, I really wonder if they're looking out for my best interest or just giving out pills.

Thoughts?
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Old 01-17-2013, 09:08 PM   #92
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I honestly thought I might have ADD. Just thought maybe I was hard on myself though. At what point is it a problem vs a personality? And do I want to take pills to correct it? Maybe seeing a doc wouldn't be a horrible thing. Problem is, I really wonder if they're looking out for my best interest or just giving out pills.

Thoughts?
It may be a good idea for you not to think much about not liking work (generally). Just continue living your life as is, including your job. And keep up with the investing and [liquid] savings. That will be an advantage for you (as it already is).
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Old 01-17-2013, 10:06 PM   #93
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It may be a good idea for you not to think much about not liking work (generally). Just continue living your life as is, including your job. And keep up with the investing and [liquid] savings. That will be an advantage for you (as it already is).
Yeah, work isn't really so bad if I don't think about it. It's just nice to not have to work.

Sometimes I think I beat myself up too much. If I look around I'm much more successful (maybe not in their eyes) and happy than the people that surround me. Maybe I need to be around more positive people and avoid the negative.

All in all, I'm fairly happy. I don't have much to complain about except that extra time would be nice. But the matter of fact is, you've got to work to get to that free time.
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Old 01-17-2013, 10:07 PM   #94
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All in all, I'm fairly happy. I don't have much to complain about except that extra time would be nice. But the matter of fact is, you've got to work to get to that free time.
That would be a nice way to end the thread.
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Old 01-18-2013, 06:58 AM   #95
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I honestly thought I might have ADD. Just thought maybe I was hard on myself though. At what point is it a problem vs a personality? And do I want to take pills to correct it? Maybe seeing a doc wouldn't be a horrible thing. Problem is, I really wonder if they're looking out for my best interest or just giving out pills.

Thoughts?
I do not believe in a medical approach for this. My view is that doctors and the pharmaceutical industry look out for their financial interest and medicate people for what is normal variations in human beings. Just find a career that works for you and something that you enjoy. Sucess in college is not the only way to be successful. It just depends on how you measure success. Although I worry about my daughter, I recognize that she can choose a line of work that goes well with the strengths she has. She can choose to be self-employed as well.
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Old 01-18-2013, 07:02 AM   #96
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40 hours a week WOULD be semi-retirement for me.............
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