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Old 04-24-2010, 06:53 PM   #61
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Yep. Leno pointed this out last night as proof at the SEC the left hand didn't know what the right hand was doing...
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Old 04-25-2010, 08:35 AM   #62
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I wonder where Mean Mr Mustard has gone?

At least we know where the SEC Lawyers are hanging out!
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Old 04-25-2010, 08:37 AM   #63
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I wonder where Mean Mr Mustard has gone?
My initial thought was "to the conservatory with a candlestick," but I could be wrong.
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Old 04-25-2010, 09:01 PM   #64
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Didn't realize these are the lumpen slums of cyberspace.

Does this mean we are eligible for the free cheese the government hands out ?
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Old 04-25-2010, 09:50 PM   #65
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Does this mean we are eligible for the free cheese the government hands out ?
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Old 07-13-2010, 02:06 PM   #66
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OP, I empathize with you. Our situations are similar. Here are some thoughts:

1. It is critical to get a grip on your expenses, by which I mean "follow the money." Because taxes are so very high, the shift to ER is huge on that score. But you can get a feel for your other expenses. Determine what your "pro forma for retirement" spending will likely be, then add a cushion. Then add another cushion. Believe you will find you are already "there." I am. This is very liberating.

2. If you like being as lawyer (I do), then don't quit. But restrcuture your work to cut out everything you don't like -- even if that will "hurt" your on-going compensation. I am amazed by the fact that so many of the very fine lawyers that I have known have never quit practicing law. And I mean "never." As in, worked until they died. People who could have quit 30 years ago. And why is this? Because they do only what they want to do, and nothing else. An example is William Rehnquist, whom I was privileged to know. When he was asked in his 80s whether he would retire, he replied, "Retire to what?"

3. You DO have the resources to retire now. But rather than do that, in my opinion and experience this is when it starts to get interesting. Because if you can quit, then you can also dictate your terms for staying on. Not in a cruel or difficult way. Just matter of fact. Take advantage of that -- you've earned it.
SEC lawyer: Thanks for post. I read it a long time ago, but was at the time involved in a bunch of s hearing at about the same, so I had no time to reply. I have been thinking about your post nevertheless ever since. I appreciate your post and thank others for their useful and interesting comments. Sorry it has taken this long to get back to site. Odd to discover many comments accumulated on thread over the months.

Comments: would have loved to have known Rehnquist!

You suggested I restructure lawyer work to cut out everything you dont like. Maybe. Thinking about it. Heres the problem. Im specialized, law-wise. You need to be immersed in the area I am in to be useful. The case law, regulations, political environment change constantly. Im like a doctor who specializes in toenails. I really know toenails!! I was involved in all the Big Toenail Developments over the last 20 years. But its hard to be half-in, half-out. I was kind of a pioneer when I started, but now there are younger, hungrier toenail experts out there. Hard to be an eminence gris in the fast-changing toenail world. Some times I think I should just get out, be an investor, and never think about toenails again.

Expenses: You and many other posters stressed I had to track family expenses. Obvious, but I had never done it. So I figured out what they were. This part is embarrassing to admit. Ill lay it out anyway, in case it helps others engaged in similar beanhead behavour.

In post that started this thread I foolishly said I thought my expenses were 100,000K. Many commentators berated me for being foggy about this, and rightly so. Some suspected they were higher.

Prompted by posters, I started figuring out what family expenses actually were. Not easy. They had become somewhat intermingled over many years with my law firm expenditures, so eggs had to be unscrambled. Information retrieval problem: wife dealt with home expenditures and had Visa and chequing account statements in piles, but long list of debits and credits not much help in trying to get a grip on the big picture.

Preliminary conclusion a shocker: family expenses in 2009 about $225,000, excluding tax and investments. I could not believe it. What do we spend this money on? I got Quicken about New Year, 2010, and now use it to track all family expenses. Not rocket science, I realize. Expenses in 2010 up to June 30 about 100,000, so could be 200Kto 225K annually. We have jettisoned some doubtful expenditures.

My problem was that, although I paid attention to expenses at law firm and investments for years, I paid little attention to household expenses, and they were dealt with by wife, not a record keeper by nature. I thought there was no need to track expenses closely because shes not a big spender, and we dont live a lavish lifestyle.

Its not that expenses were out of hand, necessarily. The problem was that I was in la-la land as to what they were. Obviously, knowing ones living expenses is key to any useful analysis of whether ER is possible, a question which pops up in my thoughts more and more.

200K to 225K amount just seems to be what it costs for care and feeding of four teenagers, aged 12 20, in urban setting, one in U. No big ticket items really, just endless smaller expenditures on food, dining out, ultilites, clothes, movies, house tax, insurance, gas, cable, getting stuff fixed, concerts, lessons, tuition, residence, school trip, family vacation, camps etc etc.

Fine (once I got over shock). Now I know. Thank you ER boarders for hectoring me to go though this painful but worthwhile exercise. How could I ever have thought I did not need to keep track of expenses? I can only say that I repent my bozo-like former life and am reborn.

So situation is this, to recap: Im 51, lawyer, wife at home, four kids (12 20), about $4,000,000 plus in liquid assets, mostly stocks. Close attention to investments (really!). No mortgage, no debts. Expenses 200 to 225K although presumably not forever as ducklings exit the nest. Earn 1.8 million pre-tax in good year, but can be under a million in bad year. Varies. Pooped out and fed up with toenails. Can I ER? Should I ER? Enlightenment sought from this humble and penitent scribe to wise wizards of ER site.
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Old 07-13-2010, 03:11 PM   #67
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If nothing else, you have learned some valuable info for planning purposes regarding spending. I'd spend some more time drilling down into the spending now versus spending in retirement question before I dumped the big toenail practice (possibly the best analogy I've ever read, and funniest, to describe a boutique practice of any kind!).
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Old 07-13-2010, 03:28 PM   #68
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Originally Posted by meanmrmustard View Post
So situation is this, to recap: Im 51, lawyer, wife at home, four kids (12 20), about $4,000,000 plus in liquid assets, mostly stocks. Close attention to investments (really!). No mortgage, no debts. Expenses 200 to 225K although presumably not forever as ducklings exit the nest. Earn 1.8 million pre-tax in good year, but can be under a million in bad year. Varies. Pooped out and fed up with toenails. Can I ER? Should I ER? Enlightenment sought from this humble and penitent scribe to wise wizards of ER site.
I give no suggestions to one with these stats. Just tell us more about doing this. And offload one of those bad years to me, could you?

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Old 07-13-2010, 04:37 PM   #69
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Congrats on making such great headway in "really" understanding where the bucks go.
If you really want to lower the household spending of 200+K, I can assure you, if you drill down and attack the list of where the dollars go, you will find it relatively easy to carve off 20-30%. Much of what we see as "necessary" is, in fact, a matter of habit and/or inattention. The savings may not come in big bucks at one time but increments do matter. With a Million/yr income, it may seem like more work than you want so it really up to deciding it is a priority.
For example, examining the various insurance premiums you pay. If you have not reviewed your deductibles and coverages recently, and multiple cars, you an carve off 10-15% of your insurance bill. Not a huge number in 200k spending and a 1 Million income but the first of many savings.
Now you have your spending defined, suggest you break the expenditures into some categories of choices--eg non discretionary (look for doing different--see insurance above), critical to family happiness/values, nice to have, other
Then, ask yourself, what would happen if you no longer spent any of the bottom categories. Could you get the same satisfaction by spending the $ differently, or better by not spending at all.
Look at the 'critical to family happiness' group and make sure the $ are really the source of the happiness. What other ways would provide the same type/level of satisfaction.
You obviously have a lot of gifts. You will probably find an incredible number of ways that you can carve some big chunks with little or no lost in your or your family sense of worth. Once you and your DW have sorted out the categories, involve the rest of the family. Not only will they see things you do not, but you will also give your kids the gift of future financial independence by helping them to learn the value of choosing.
Best wishes achieving the life you desire.
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Old 07-13-2010, 05:21 PM   #70
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My problem was that, although I paid attention to expenses at law firm and investments for years, I paid little attention to household expenses, and they were dealt with by wife, not a record keeper by nature.
Cf. The Millionaire Next Door.

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200K to 225K amount just seems to be what it costs for care and feeding of four teenagers, aged 12 – 20, in urban setting, one in U. No big ticket items really, just endless smaller expenditures on food, dining out, ultilites, clothes, movies, house tax, insurance, gas, cable, getting stuff fixed, concerts, lessons, tuition, residence, school trip, family vacation, camps etc etc.
Many Canadians manage similar circumstances on substantially smaller budgets. On the other hand, some people spend considerably more and have fewer teenagers, or none at all. Only you know what is necessary and what is not.

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So situation is this, to recap: I’m 51, lawyer, wife at home, four kids (12 – 20), about $4,000,000 plus in liquid assets, mostly stocks. Close attention to investments (really!). No mortgage, no debts. Expenses 200 to 225K although presumably not forever as ducklings exit the nest. Earn 1.8 million pre-tax in good year, but can be under a million in bad year. Varies. Pooped out and fed up with toenails. Can I ER? Should I ER? Enlightenment sought from this humble and penitent scribe to wise wizards of ER site.
You can retire tomorrow and enjoy a comfortable lifestyle; but I doubt that $4 million capital would be sufficient to fund $200,000-$225,000 annual after-tax expenses. That would work out to approximately a 5% yield/withdrawal rate: certainly possible, but aggressive.

As I see it,your options are essentially as follows:

(i) re-think what constitutes a "lavish lifestyle", and trim your expenses accordingly;
(ii) continue working and saving/investing until you have significantly increased your capital;
(iii) a combination of (i) and (ii); or
(iv) tinker with the assumptions until you are able to convince yourself that a 5% rate is sustainable in the long-term.
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Old 07-13-2010, 10:18 PM   #71
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You will either need to work a couple more years, until you have at least $5M-$5.5M, or you could retire now, if you could figure out how to realistically cut your expenses to $140K-$160k, with $160k possibly being while the teenagers are still around.

Tuition is going to possibly be a huge expense, state schools may be $10k-15k/year, but the expensive ones can be $30k-40k/year, and you are talking about doing it for four kids at the same time. I am leaning towards working 2-3 more years as pretty likely.
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Old 07-13-2010, 10:59 PM   #72
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200K to 225K amount just seems to be what it costs for care and feeding of four teenagers, aged 12 20, in urban setting, one in U. No big ticket items really, just endless smaller expenditures on food, dining out, ultilites, clothes, movies, house tax, insurance, gas, cable, getting stuff fixed, concerts, lessons, tuition, residence, school trip, family vacation, camps etc etc.
I am a recently semi-retired lawyer with 3 adolescent children. My husband recently retired from his work as well. Back in the day we had spending a little less, but similar, to yours. We are retiring on far less net worth than you have. A few comments:

1. For me I was able to structure a very part-time arrangement (one day a week) doing the part of my work that I really enjoy. I have no ongoing responsibilities on cases but essentially consult with the lawyers that I used to work with. I am being paid a very nice amount for doing this. This made it easier for us to retire/sem-retire while kids are still at home. I will be glad to keep doing this work while I enjoy it, but could manage without it.

2. There are two basic ways to cut expenses. Cuts lots of litte ones (a bottom up approach) or cut a few big ones (a top down approach). Most people, in my experience, focus on the former. This is often easy to do and gives immediate rewards. This is where you cut out some of the lunches out, dine out less frequently, cut down Starbucks, buy clothes on sale, get books from the library instead of buying, and so on.

You undoubtedly can do a lot of this. I never felt that I was living a very lavish lifestyle, particularly since so much our expenses were child related. That said, I took certain things as a given. I was quick to replace things or upgrade them. I didn't sweat the small stuff. I would sometimes see lists of other peoples expenses and had to realize at some point that many of my ordinary expenses were things that most people could live without.

I knew people who had an income a quarter or a third of mine yet somehow managed to support a family with 3 children. So, yes, people were managing to somehow not have a $200 a month cell phone bill or a $150 internet and cable bill and so on.

I found that there were a lot of those small expenditures that could be cut.

But here's the deal. Doing that wasn't enough. (In your case, maybe it would be enough). In some instances I could have cut more, but I also felt that doing so was cutting into hobbies and activities that I truly enjoy. I knew they were luxuries but luxuries I didn't want to give up. So that led to:

3. Cut the big stuff. Ultimately you get much more bang for your buck by cutting the really big expenses. Here is an example. Right now, we have our big, expensive house on the market. Nice house. But we decided to downsize to a smaller house less expensve to maintain. Doing this will have us about $40,000 a year. Just that one change. I could vow to never go out to lunch, read only library books and never go to Starbucks...and I still wouldn't save as much money as simply moving to a smaller, lower maintenance house.

So I encourage you to look at not just your little expenses but the big ones as well. Those can be more difficult to cut but the rewards can be huge, so huge that those may be the only changes you need to make.
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Old 07-14-2010, 11:56 AM   #73
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I think you might want to look at a realistic savings plan. During your high earning years is when savings peak. If the next couple of years are in the mid-range, aim to save half of your net. Then work the extra number of years needed to support your retirement lifestyle. I would suggest that your earliest target date should be when you are empty nesters for the first time?

Make sure to get the buy-in of your spouse. This might take several iterations.
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Old 07-23-2010, 12:30 PM   #74
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Hi,
This comes from a 51 year old corporate counsel, planning to ER in 2012.
My 2 cents: Please track expenses in detail (with at least as much effort as your investment research) before you make an irrevocable decision.
With your stated expenses and 20(?) years in practice, your income and ROI there should be more than 4M and a house.
My guess is that there is more than one hole in the expenses. Identify them!
It really is not Hard to give a precise figure on annual spending because money seems to leak from many holes in the bathtub on teenager/kid stuff such as lessons, money for movies, concerts, skiing, clothes, food once you have started tracking your expenses.
I only read a few postings, since I was curious about the financial side of the thread, but there's little. Mostly about transition to ER, so pardon my disinterest on this.
Speaking of finances, I DO agree with Chris's advice that you should involve more math in your family's finances. It really sounds strange when you say you love investing and reading about finances/WS, but don't have a basic understanding about your money. Since you're very rich by income and Net Worth, I think you could afford to hire a personal accountant for a year or two to figure out your cashflow.
So, like Chris I also imagine you should be much richer than $4Mln + a house that you claim to be very moderate + successful investing 7%/year for 10 years.
You've been in practice for 20 (or 25, cannot recall) years. You earned $1.8mln/yr for the last 2 GOOD years. So, I kind of assume you made roughly a cool Mln in bad years. Taxes are say 60% (I've heard Canada is brutal in that regard, but hey, no need to buy health insurance). If you say expenses are ONLY $100K/year, so you must have had $200-300K/year to invest in bad years and $600k/yr (conservative #) in good years. It sounds like you had $3mln of savings alone for the last 10 years, not counting your early earnings + growth of 7% as you claim.
Anyway, something doesn't add up for me, but I understand it could be hard to count money when earning so much and perhaps it's hard to determine your outflow, but that's the most important part in your ER.
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Old 07-23-2010, 12:37 PM   #75
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Oops, sorry, I should've read a few posts at the end since now it sounds your expenses are almost $250K (QUITE a jump from $100k). So, how much do you pay in taxes? Just curious, because it still you should have more $$.
OTOH, I'm sure you could retire if your expenses went down to $100K like you initially claimed
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Old 07-25-2010, 07:46 AM   #76
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You have the assets! What are you waiting for? Do you want to spend more time with your kids before they are gone? TRY PARTIAL retirement at first. Visit with your partners, get help with the cases you have, gradually stop working full time and stay as an "advisor" to help them with the "Marketing" aspects. You basically keep working part time to wine and dine and keep a back log of work coming in for them. Make sure your partners come along to establish a relationship w/the client. If you miss it, go back! If not, they have a relationship built and your home free! Please explore ways to cut your taxes. I have rental properties and stay active regarding their management so it is a great tax advantage. Consult your CPA or Financial advisor ASAP!
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Old 11-09-2010, 05:31 PM   #77
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Thought I'd check in and update. It's been a few months. Thanks all posters. I'm 51, still grinding away at practice of law although seem to have entered a recession-related slowdown lately, so earnings have dropped off, key associate lawyer I work with leaving to go in-house for a client of ours, another very good associate still with me. Portfolio doing OK, it's now $4.5 million, plus a few hundred K cash in firm account I haven't transferred to portfolio yet, plus modest house, mortgage-free. No debt. I now track all household expenses carefully in Quicken, a result of input from this board (thanks!). So I now know where household spending goes, and am glad I do, but don't seem to have succeeded in reducing outflow much. Wife not working, four teenagers. Lots going on, all somehow involving spending $. We don't seem to have snazzy lifestyle, yet our family household costs, including 20 year old in university are $210K to 225K/yr, excluding income taxes, but including property tax. Seems a huge amount to most people, I know. Lifestyle-wise, we do not look much different from other downtown families that I know, that likely earn a lot less. I really can't understand how the proverbial firefighter married to a teacher do it -especially with several kids. Easy to see why so many folk can't save anything and/or go into debt! Maybe its downtown lifestyle. Things would maybe be different if we were in small town or rural area. I don't seem to have taken steps to ER in any definite way, nor even started a transition process, so it seems I'm choosing by default to continue in salt mine for a few more years. Assets may seem high enough to most folks that ER is a no-brainer, but in fact, its not clear from FireCalc that I can confidently ER in all future market scenarios, as discussed by certain hard-nosed posters, above. Getting to say 6 million would make it a pretty sure bet. One recent development is I am getting headhunted a lot lately by big law firms, forcing navel-gazing: do I want to get out or not? Do I want to commit to working a few years in return for some big signing bonus (i.e essentially sell my firm)? Stay where I am? Pack it in now? Am I being too cautious? Guide me, anonymous sages and oracles!
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Old 11-09-2010, 09:32 PM   #78
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We don't seem to have snazzy lifestyle, yet our family household costs, including 20 year old in university are $210K to 225K/yr, excluding income taxes, but including property tax. Seems a huge amount to most people, I know. Lifestyle-wise, we do not look much different from other downtown families that I know, that likely earn a lot less.
I do understand. I am also an attorney, 3 kids. Income not as high as yours but there was a time when we spent a lot and we were in considerable debt. That was then and this is now and we don't have the debt any more and are spending probably a third of what we spent 5 to 10 years ago, and that is with 2 kids in college.

Coincidentally, this weekend I was looking at some of my old records of spending and I was astounded at some of what I used to spend and take for granted.

Last month we spent about $200 for dining out and groceries were under $800. That is with 4 of us in the house, the youngest 14.

But 7 or 8 years ago, we routinely spent $400 to $600 a month on dining out. We ate out several times a week. At that time, our kids mostly ate lower cost kids meals and of course there has been some inflation but we spent much more on dining out then. Now? We don't dine out that often and frequently it is just DH and I rather than us and the kids. We pay more attention to where we dine out and how much it costs.

7 or 8 years ago we also spent closer to $1500 a month on groceries. True there were more people in the house then but still...

We freely bought DVD movies whenever we wanted them. Now we use Netflix and Hulu and an occasional Itunes TV series.

We went on one or two vacations a year staying at a nice place but not extravagant. Still that was $5000 to $10000 a year. Now we go on vacation every couple of years and spend less.

Some of our expenses were related to child needs (we had a child in a therapeutic school...sending him to college is actually cheaper).

Still...I realize that I used to be just much less concerned with how much things cost. I used to spend $100 a month to get my hair colored and cut. Now I go to one of those cheapie places every 3 months for a cut and when I was coloring bought the color at the store and did it myself. Big difference in cost.

10 years ago I bought a brand new Lexus with all the bells and whistles. It was over $40k even then. Two years ago I actually did buy a new car but it was a Prius (with cloth seats and I passed on getting a lot of upgrades) that cost much less.

Anyway, looking back on what I used to spend I am amazed by much of it. Some of it I would do again (many of the things that were child related). A lot of it I did without really thinking about it and just assumed it as part of upper middle class normality. But the reality is that most people just don't spend money that way.

From your first post: "lessons, money for movies, concerts, skiing, clothes, food (difficult to dine out with family of six for less than $150), excursions, once a year trips (travel is expensive when you have to pay for six airline tickets and two maybe three hotel rooms)."

Most people can't afford to do most of those things or do them on a very small basis. They don't do lessons or they do one kind of lesson and no more. They go to movies infrequently. They don't go to concerts that cost money and can't afford to ski. Their clothes are the basics. They don't dine out often. When they do, they don't go to places that cost $25 a person to eat. They go to McDonalds or something very inexpensive or just the parents go without the kids. They don't go on vacation every year. Or they go somewhere within driving distance so they don't pay for airline tickets. They stay with friends or family, etc. All of that spending is discretionary (well we need some clothes and food). It is nice to be able to do all that (and I know it from personal experience). But those are all wants and not needs.
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Old 11-09-2010, 10:41 PM   #79
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Getting to say 6 million would make it a pretty sure bet. One recent development is I am getting headhunted a lot lately by big law firms, forcing navel-gazing: do I want to get out or not? Do I want to commit to working a few years in return for some big signing bonus (i.e essentially sell my firm)? Stay where I am? Pack it in now? Am I being too cautious? Guide me, anonymous sages and oracles!
I see this all the time in military veterans of your age approaching a 30-year retirement decision, and I've prepared a small wake-up talk for them. Are you asking for the tough-love approach? If you are, then here's what it would sound like:

First, military veterans lawyers are notorious for having no reason to ER. Apparently you're doing what you love and would hypothetically only get better at it with age. There are lawyers on this board who are also ER or heading in that direction, but who perhaps accelerated their ER plans because their firms would not cooperate with specialization interests or part-time wants or telecommuting desires. They're willing to cut expenses and boost savings without a 101% guarantee of success. You do not seem to fit any of those criteria.

Second, you're not mentally or emotionally ready to ER. Don't even waste your time agonizing about it. You're not willing to reduce your expenses, you're not confident in the FIRECalc financial forecasts, and you're not focusing on what you'd do all day. Heck, you're even contemplating going after a civilian career better job offer. If you really sincerely gave a crap about ER then you wouldn't have to consult your navel. If you hated what you're doing or just wanted more control over your daily life then those "non-discretionary expenses" would vaporize in a heartbeat. You have neither incentive nor desire to change your behavior.

Finally, your $6M probability logic is mathematically protected from a whole flock of black swans, but it still leaves room for error. Would you feel better if you waited until you had $10M? $8M? $6.5M? What's your real number? Right now you're just pushing the finish line back because you don't seem to want the race to end. You could read Bernstein's comments on financial forecasts, especially part III where he implies that any success guarantee over 80% is semantically meaningless:
(FAQ archive): Bernstein's "Retirement Calculator from Hell" articles

You would be surprised at the number of ERs who have managed to accomplish their goal on about one-sixth of your portfolio, with the same size of family. Some have done it with even less despite having more kids. Cutting expenses and relocation would accelerate that ER goal but are not always mandatory. Good thing for you, because you don't seem to be motivated to consider either one.

You're not being overcautious so much as you're being "not ready". In that situation, your ER now would be a miserable failure exceeded only by your unhappiness. Heck, your family would probably be even more unhappy with than you.

When the ER time is right, you can't expect to have the heavens part and for archangels to sound the trumpets. So... what would it take for you to truly emotionally and physically desire ER? Grumpy co-workers? Bickering partners? A loss of control over your time? A colleague's heart attack or a stroke? One of your own?

Start with a small ER-readiness cost-control experiment: try not to eat out for a week. Yes, yikes-- try to eat 21 consecutive meals from food that you've prepared at home. Just so that there are no misunderstandings, that means brown-bagging everything breakfast and dinner.

Then see if you can do it for a month.

Then see if you can persuade your family to do it for a week.

Maybe then you'll be ready to think about the threads like "city living without a car" or "expecting your kids to pay the extra college expenses above a public school" or "frugal cooking" or a subscription to the "Dollar Stretcher" weekly e-mail.

Or maybe you'll decide that you're not totally despondent over your current lifestyle and not unwilling to renew your membership in the "just one more year" club. Put away your dog-eared highlighted copy of "Your Money Or Your Life" (with all the notations in the margins) and read Marc Freedman's "Encore". What, you don't have a worn-out copy of YMOYL? Well, QED.

Judging from my personal experience on a much smaller scale, I would suspect that 95% of the board's membership is not sympathetic to the travails and trials of ER'ing on a $4.5M portfolio, let alone the issues associated with getting to $6M.

But that's just the talk I give to shipmates who don't see how I could possibly have achieved ER on less money than they think they "need". If you're looking for something other than the tough-love approach, then "Never mind"...
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Old 11-09-2010, 11:09 PM   #80
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Nord's is one of the best writers on the forum, so I am not going to try and improve on his tough love.

So let me just add this thought. There is absolutely nothing wrong with continuing to work. If you enjoy or probably more accurately feel challenged by your job than keep to doing it. I'm sure that the legal profession is intellectually challenging and probably feels good when you win case/help a deserving client.

I've been retired for more than 10 years and I am your same age 51. I was absolutely ready to take some time off and I don't regret my decision to do it. But big part of the reason I did quit is I found myself with sufficient assets to retire, sort of like a lottery winner. I know many people with similar assets and even a handful with $10+ million who continued to work. I enjoy the freedom to dp what I want and lack of pressure that early retirement brings, however there absolutely times I miss the sense of accomplishment/meaning that is associated with a good job. I imagine most everyone has good and bad years in the workforce. I can say that being retired is much better than a bad job, but not as fulfilling as a good job. So if I could find a "good" job I'd take even if I don't really need the money. Of course in this economy finding any job is a challenge so nothing is likely to change.
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