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Old 10-30-2011, 10:19 PM   #21
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I don't feel bad about the idea of giving minimal notice. Companies go out of their way with their policies to remind you that you are an at-will employee who can be let go because they don't like the tie you're wearing.

It's a two way street. If the company can't handle people leaving with 2 or no weeks notice, they should offer some kind of contract, like severance assurances in the case anyone is laid off. There's a solution for their problem other than just hoping and praying their employees will be "professional". Just give your essential employees a contract so they can't leave without penalties.

But you can't reserve the right to let people go on a moment's notice, and then cry foul when you don't get 3 months notice from employees who decide to leave.
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Old 10-30-2011, 10:42 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glippy View Post
I don't feel bad about the idea of giving minimal notice. Companies go out of their way with their policies to remind you that you are an at-will employee who can be let go because they don't like the tie you're wearing.

It's a two way street. If the company can't handle people leaving with 2 or no weeks notice, they should offer some kind of contract, like severance assurances in the case anyone is laid off. There's a solution for their problem other than just hoping and praying their employees will be "professional". Just give your essential employees a contract so they can't leave without penalties.

But you can't reserve the right to let people go on a moment's notice, and then cry foul when you don't get 3 months notice from employees who decide to leave.
While I agree in principle with this idea I don't believe that everyone works just for a cold heartless company. I agree that the legal employment policies for corporations in most states provide complete at-will working clauses. However, I don't believe that we should use these in order to determine how we act in response.

I believe we each have to do what we believe is the right thing for our situation and the people we are leaving behind. Will the company care that we give no notice? Of course not. But the people we leave behind are likely to have to pick up the slack and deal with our absence.

I would not give no notice because I legally had the right to give no notice, but would instead base it upon what I believe is the right way to depart and treat those I have worked along side.

That all being said, there are some jobs I could not get away from fast enough and giving 2 weeks seems far too nice.
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Old 10-30-2011, 11:28 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by glippy View Post
I don't feel bad about the idea of giving minimal notice. Companies go out of their way with their policies to remind you that you are an at-will employee who can be let go because they don't like the tie you're wearing.

It's a two way street. If the company can't handle people leaving with 2 or no weeks notice, they should offer some kind of contract, like severance assurances in the case anyone is laid off. There's a solution for their problem other than just hoping and praying their employees will be "professional". Just give your essential employees a contract so they can't leave without penalties.

But you can't reserve the right to let people go on a moment's notice, and then cry foul when you don't get 3 months notice from employees who decide to leave.
While the above quote may have some truth to it, it is still probably wise to leave by doing the right thing. At first I felt like doing something like this but I eventually decided that I wanted to leave on a positive note. I was pleasant to everyone to the end. I didn't vent frustrations or sow discord among the employees I was leaving behind. Now that I am ER'd I am glad I didn't leave with any ill feelings left behind.
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Old 11-05-2011, 08:54 AM   #24
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In my case, I gave notice in May to retire at the end on July. I had already been "ghosted" so the way they treated me did not change.
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Old 11-05-2011, 10:23 AM   #25
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I gave a 2 year notice. Sounds crazy, but I was a business partner and a lot of my retirement stash was tied up in company stock. I wanted my partners to have plenty of time to decide who was going to buy my stock. In hindsight, 6 months would have been plenty as they didn't put much thought into it until that time anyway. If I had been employed under normal arrangements(no equity in a business), I would have given minimal notice.
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Old 11-05-2011, 02:01 PM   #26
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I would not give any more than a 6 month notice. Should they want you longer they might offer some type of extra incentive to stay a few more months.
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Old 11-05-2011, 02:38 PM   #27
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I've never worked anywhere that had any concept of retirement other than the fact they they offered a 401k plan.

So in terms of the way one leaves the company - "retiring" is no different than "resigning" - and 2 weeks notice is sufficient for either.
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Old 11-06-2011, 10:35 AM   #28
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I would not give such a long notice. I don't really understand what it does for you? Makes you a nice guy? I wouldn't want to screw my employer, but they know what the game is. I plan 2 weeks notice.

I gave early notice (2 months) once before and they put me on a horrible mind numbing project of documenting the entire departments policies and procedures. When this happened, I just quit. Too much can happen. Plus our bonus and stock options are subjective and I can't imagine my manager giving me a bonus that is any more than minimum required if he knows I am leaving. I would do the same!
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Old 11-06-2011, 11:11 AM   #29
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For those that are entitled to bonuses: My previous 2 employers gave bonuses. As a Manager, I was given a fixed allotment of $$$ to divvy out to eligible employees. If one gives too-long notice and is eligible for bonus, their manager might decide to give him/her no or little bonus, and use the savings for the employees who remain.
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Old 11-06-2011, 11:28 AM   #30
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I agree with this.
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I would not give any more than a 6 month notice.
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Old 11-06-2011, 12:06 PM   #31
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I retired from the feds in 2009. In 1995, our organization had an ugly, "politically-driven" RIF. It was then that I began my countdown to my 55th birthday, when I could and did retire. My analog countdown was posted on my office door, until it was replaced by a countdown clock some years later. With time, absolutely everyone in the organization knew about it. I had a unique skill set, so my services were in demand until I walked out the door. In essence, I gave them over 14 years notice.
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Old 11-06-2011, 12:21 PM   #32
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I retired from the feds in 2009. In 1995, our organization had an ugly, "politically-driven" RIF. It was then that I began my countdown to my 55th birthday, when I could and did retire. My analog countdown was posted on my office door, until it was replaced by a countdown clock some years later. With time, absolutely everyone in the organization knew about it. I had a unique skill set, so my services were in demand until I walked out the door. In essence, I gave them over 14 years notice.
I think that's a record for countdown length! Wonderful, aldo. You had a goal and you stuck with it for fourteen years and retired on schedule.
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Old 11-06-2011, 12:39 PM   #33
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Thanks W2R. My only regret is that I didn't make note of the number when I began my countdown. I only remember it being greater than 5,000 and quietly celebrating 4,999
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Old 11-07-2011, 05:56 AM   #34
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I don't feel bad about the idea of giving minimal notice. Companies go out of their way with their policies to remind you that you are an at-will employee who can be let go because they don't like the tie you're wearing.

It's a two way street. If the company can't handle people leaving with 2 or no weeks notice, they should offer some kind of contract, like severance assurances in the case anyone is laid off. There's a solution for their problem other than just hoping and praying their employees will be "professional". Just give your essential employees a contract so they can't leave without penalties.

But you can't reserve the right to let people go on a moment's notice, and then cry foul when you don't get 3 months notice from employees who decide to leave.
+++1 It is only business. Look out for yourself. I always laugh when these self anointed important managers think the company will not go on without them.
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Old 11-07-2011, 08:41 AM   #35
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Those last three months were an eternity but if you are a manager then you need to give several months notice just to be professionally responsible.
I respectfully disagree. Management is an occupation rather than a profession. Unlike, say, a doctor or lawyer who has a responsibilty to look out for his or her patients/clients during transition periods, a manager has no ethical obligation to provide an employer with several months notice.

glippy, well said.
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Old 11-07-2011, 08:55 AM   #36
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I have to admit that I am with Jay, Milton, and Glippy on this. Most employment these days is at will -- meaning that either party may terminate employment for any reason at any time. Two weeks notice is considered customary.

This is not to say that there are not some very valuable employees who, if they gave only two weeks notice of leaving would not impact the company. In these cases, it is up to the employers to protect themselves with policies, procedures, and if necessary, employment contracts.

Edit to add: of course there are some exceptions, but certainly not in the majority of cases.
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Old 11-07-2011, 09:17 AM   #37
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I respectfully disagree. Management is an occupation rather than a profession. Unlike, say, a doctor or lawyer who has a responsibilty to look out for his or her patients/clients during transition periods, a manager has no ethical obligation to provide an employer with several months notice.

glippy, well said.
I guess it depends on whether you expect to get another job and whether the way you left the old job matters to your new employer.

Years ago I left a group I had been working with for 2-3 years. I really didn't like the group leader and the way the group was run. I got another job within the same employer and made a vow not to bad mouth the people I had previously worked with. If my opinion were made known then it would probably have gotten around to my colleagues. I've seen others leave the organization and send out a vitriolic email on their way out. I felt it was in bad taste and would not have been inclined to give them a positive recommendation if I had been asked.

When I ER'd I left, as I said, on a positive note. I still go out to lunch with some of the people I worked with. While I made my ER decision when I was angry, I had six months to calm down and I'm glad I did. To each his own . . .
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Old 11-07-2011, 10:06 AM   #38
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Years ago I left a group I had been working with for 2-3 years. I really didn't like the group leader and the way the group was run. I got another job within the same employer and made a vow not to bad mouth the people I had previously worked with. If my opinion were made known then it would probably have gotten around to my colleagues. I've seen others leave the organization and send out a vitriolic email on their way out. I felt it was in bad taste and would not have been inclined to give them a positive recommendation if I had been asked.

When I ER'd I left, as I said, on a positive note.
Marty, we were discussing giving notice, or did I miss something?
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Old 11-07-2011, 10:12 AM   #39
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I always try to avoid burning bridges now. In the past I burnt some, and it came back to bite me in the butt.

I remember a guy who just went to HR one day and put in his retirement papers. Neither he nor HR told his supervisor. A few weeks went by as the guy out processed at HR. Then he just didn't show up on Monday.

After a couple of days his former supervisor called HR and they told him the guy had retired! I assume there was some bad blood involved or something. The guy was only a mechanic, so had no real responsibilities.

That story just makes me shake my head at the dysfunction.
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Old 11-08-2011, 03:18 PM   #40
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Haha I sort of love that idea. I detest my manager.
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