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Old 05-23-2012, 04:17 PM   #21
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Your accomplishment in acquiring such a tidy sum so early in life is remarkable. Since I had a negative net worth until the age of 40, I can offer no advice except --- I think you're there, dude. Kick back and enjoy the next 40 to 50 years !
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Old 05-23-2012, 04:30 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by GrayHare

The question is not the affordability but rather the accounting. I'd expect someone whose health care is paid for by the government and is 95% disabled would not ordinarily have enough ways to spend $150k per year.
I hope that is not a crack against the disabled because it is sure starting to come across like that.
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Old 05-23-2012, 04:59 PM   #23
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If you're into schadenfreude, I am looking to retire early-ish (39 or 40) with liquid assets of +/- 1.8MM and truthfully yes, I am terrified of running out of money before going under the grass.
Why retire then? If you are terrified of running out of money, shouldn't you increase your chances of success by working longer?
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Old 05-23-2012, 05:28 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by FIREd

Why retire then? If you are terrified of running out of money, shouldn't you increase your chances of success by working longer?
I think I'll always be scared of running out of money. Doesn't equate to a reason not to do it.
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Old 05-23-2012, 09:17 PM   #25
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The question is not the affordability but rather the accounting. I'd expect someone whose health care is paid for by the government and is 95% disabled would not ordinarily have enough ways to spend $150k per year.
How does his 95% disability have anything to do with how much money he can spend? A friend of mine has a 100% VA disability rating and he is spending serious money setting world records in hot air balloon circles. I think maintenance on his helicopter is also pretty pricey.
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Old 05-24-2012, 09:17 AM   #26
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I have a 95% disability rating, but I'm not 95% disabled. In the military rating world, the two aren't the same. I receive 75% for my hearing loss, 10% for tinitus, 5% for vertigo, and 5% for my knees. All of it was connected to the initial service-connected disability that retired me in the first place. I lost my hearing while active duty and 1 ear works just enough for a hearing aid. Without it, I'm completely deaf though. The other ear has no function whatsoever and is just there for looks these days

The $150k comes from the cost of living in general in my area, plus a love of travel. If I don't get on a plane somewhere at least once a month, I go stir crazy (this year has been two trips to Vegas with another already scheduled, one to Jamaica, and two to Mexico). That, coupled with how it simply expensive my area... Of the 85 employees I have, I can count on one hand the number that make less than 6 figures, and most don't have college degrees (my business is in a niche market). My county in particular is ranked in the top 5 every year for highest incomes, home prices, etc.

We shall see what the days bring.... It's going to be an interesting ride before all is said and done.
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Old 05-25-2012, 02:41 AM   #27
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I am 47. Could have retired a few years ago, in my early 40s. Yes I am worried my money will run out by the time I reach 95. Planning to retire later this year. I will use only a prudent 3.5% SWR, with annual adjustments.
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I'm curious if anyone else has been in a similar situation, perhaps through selling a business, inheriting money, stock options, etc. Do you find yourself worried it'll run out in 30 years? Are you taking enough out to live a good time without going overboard? Anything you wish you could've done differently? Any advice?
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Old 05-25-2012, 09:05 AM   #28
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I have a 95% disability rating, but I'm not 95% disabled. In the military rating world, the two aren't the same. I receive 75% for my hearing loss, 10% for tinitus, 5% for vertigo, and 5% for my knees. All of it was connected to the initial service-connected disability that retired me in the first place. I lost my hearing while active duty and 1 ear works just enough for a hearing aid. Without it, I'm completely deaf though. The other ear has no function whatsoever and is just there for looks these days

The $150k comes from the cost of living in general in my area, plus a love of travel. If I don't get on a plane somewhere at least once a month, I go stir crazy (this year has been two trips to Vegas with another already scheduled, one to Jamaica, and two to Mexico). That, coupled with how it simply expensive my area... Of the 85 employees I have, I can count on one hand the number that make less than 6 figures, and most don't have college degrees (my business is in a niche market). My county in particular is ranked in the top 5 every year for highest incomes, home prices, etc.

We shall see what the days bring.... It's going to be an interesting ride before all is said and done.
Spending seems actually modest for somebody with your assets. I would not be worried about that at all and would "treat" myself to something closer to $200K.
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Old 06-25-2012, 02:43 PM   #29
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To the OP, it's great that you have the means to retire early and so by all means do it while you can! I am no where near your net worth but FIRE is possible with proper and consistent execution. I've been working in both public and private sectors for the past 20+ years. After a recent turn of event, being me losing my job 2 months ago, I maybe forced to retire earlier than anticipated. With that being said, however; I have been planning for days like this for a very long time and have been diligently saving 50% of our income for the past 12 years, I can actually afford, albeit barely, to retire as the situation present itself as it did. Originally, I targeted retiring around 40 with the DW continuing to work part-time until around 44. But as it is, she volunteered to work full-time until 45 and/or me finding a job but I would still only work until 40. So rather than doing the corporate/government thing all over again and going through the headaches, I just call it quit! So now, she works during the day, and I would take care of all cooking and odd end house/yard work- it's great! No rush hours traffic to deal with, no more meetings, and no more commuting stress- I love it! Btw, I am 37 and DW is 36.
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