Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-02-2010, 06:17 AM   #21
Confused about dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by headingout View Post
It has struck me as ironic that problem employees get a generous severance while loyal long-term employees get none.
My thought exactly, HeadingOut! And while ethical people like you and me seem to be screwed, I don't think it's unethical to call out the injustice and try to work out a way to give the loyal long-termers a fair shake.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambler View Post
. . . your mgmt would catch on pretty quickly if you had been a highly productive and good worker and then all of a sudden you produced garbage work. In my megacorp, this would mean that I had reason to fire for cause, . . .
Rambler, I'm thinking now it will play out in a much more reasonable fashion if I tell them up front that I'm thinking of retiring soon, and would be open to an early-retirement package. From that point on, they'll be alert to any signs that I'm even slightly less enthusiastic and dedicated than before (hey, she's not working through lunch, not staying late, not volunteering for extra assignments!). And they'll realize they're paying a lot for someone whose life no longer revolves completely around work, who is no longer an A player. And since being a merely-average performer is not grounds for firing anyone, an early-retirement package might start to seem like a win for them too.
__________________

__________________
ReadyOrNot is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 11-02-2010, 06:44 AM   #22
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 360
I would not try to get fired (the bad kind). I would also not tell my boss. If you tell your boss, then it may affect the assignments you get and the decisions he makes about your short lived career with this company. I was a contractor for most of my career and once they gave me the usual 30 day notice, we called it 'dead man walking'. Why spend the last days with megacorp like this. It got a little depressing to be excluded from certain meetings, projects, training, etc.

With this economy, I would think the probability of another rif is in your favor and you can jocky for that path when it is announced.

You may also want to work part time later for this company.
__________________

__________________
jayc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2010, 07:45 AM   #23
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
donheff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 8,644
I understand the temptation but it is, in effect, a form of fraud. The choice to go for it would probably feel a lot easier if your employer treated you poorly but you say they treated you well. You might get away with it but would you feel right about it?
__________________
Every man is, or hopes to be, an Idler. -- Samuel Johnson
donheff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2010, 06:23 PM   #24
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
clifp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 7,450
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReadyOrNot View Post
My thought exactly, HeadingOut! And while ethical people like you and me seem to be screwed, I don't think it's unethical to call out the injustice and try to work out a way to give the loyal long-termers a fair shake.



Rambler, I'm thinking now it will play out in a much more reasonable fashion if I tell them up front that I'm thinking of retiring soon, and would be open to an early-retirement package. From that point on, they'll be alert to any signs that I'm even slightly less enthusiastic and dedicated than before (hey, she's not working through lunch, not staying late, not volunteering for extra assignments!). And they'll realize they're paying a lot for someone whose life no longer revolves completely around work, who is no longer an A player. And since being a merely-average performer is not grounds for firing anyone, an early-retirement package might start to seem like a win for them too.
That is pretty much what I did my last 6 months. I didn't get an early-retirement package, but they did let me take a 1 year leave of absence to see if I could get may heart back in the job. I didn't....

At times I felt frustrated of being out of the loop, but there is a lot of really interesting things on the internet and it was good training for ERing
__________________
clifp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2010, 06:44 PM   #25
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
harley's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Following the nice weather
Posts: 6,430
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReadyOrNot View Post
...I'm thinking now it will play out in a much more reasonable fashion if I tell them up front that I'm thinking of retiring soon, and would be open to an early-retirement package. From that point on, they'll be alert to any signs that I'm even slightly less enthusiastic and dedicated than before (hey, she's not working through lunch, not staying late, not volunteering for extra assignments!). And they'll realize they're paying a lot for someone whose life no longer revolves completely around work, who is no longer an A player. And since being a merely-average performer is not grounds for firing anyone, an early-retirement package might start to seem like a win for them too.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jayc View Post
I would not try to get fired (the bad kind). I would also not tell my boss. If you tell your boss, then it may affect the assignments you get and the decisions he makes about your short lived career with this company. I was a contractor for most of my career and once they gave me the usual 30 day notice, we called it 'dead man walking'. Why spend the last days with megacorp like this. It got a little depressing to be excluded from certain meetings, projects, training, etc.

With this economy, I would think the probability of another rif is in your favor and you can jocky for that path when it is announced.

You may also want to work part time later for this company.
I guess it depends on if the company downsizes on a regular basis. In my case I told them I wanted to volunteer for a RIF. They said no, because I was too valuable. I pointed out that it would preserve the job of another employee, and that I would be so unhappy if I wasn't allowed to leave under those terms that my work could suffer. In the end I got the RIF, then was hired back later as a contractor for a while. Personally, I don't see how being excluded from a meeting could possibly be depressing if you are in a FIRE mindset.

I would talk to the bosses, let them know what you want and see what they can offer. You might get more than you expected, and the worst that could happen is you end up quitting whenever you feel like it. I don't see the downside.
__________________
"Good judgment comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement." - Will Rogers, or maybe Sam Clemens
DW and I - FIREd at 50 (7/06), living off assets
harley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2010, 07:55 PM   #26
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 2,260
Just walk into your office with pajamas and slippers on and see how it pans out.
__________________
tmm99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2010, 08:31 PM   #27
Recycles dryer sheets
Tractor guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 105
Like others on this thread, I vote against trying to get fired. A lot of my retired friends have come back as part time consultants. Most are doing if for the companionship rather than the money. I learned long ago to never burn any bridges because sometimes you have to cross them going the other way.

Also, in my case there was a significant year end bonus that is prorated to retirees if they leave with an "acceptable" performance rating.

I also don't think its wise to tell anybody that you're thinking about retiring until a RIF actually is announced. I made the mistake of telling my boss that I was considering it. Heard 3 months later when a RIF was being discussed that the management team had discussed my situation and decided to keep me in place. Apparently they thought that I'd likely leave without the retirement incentive and concluded that they could eliminate my position when I pulled the trigger. Just one more way for them to save a dollar.

My company required 60 days notice. If I'd done it over, that's all I would have given them.
__________________
Tractor guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2010, 02:25 AM   #28
Full time employment: Posting here.
GoodSense's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 678
The same thing happened at my company: Less competent people were let go and given a generous package, while the rest of us slaved away with a heavier work load. It was hard to watch my former coworkers enjoying the summer off while I was busy all the time at w*rk!

I thought about goofing off to see if I could be laid off, but decided 1) it's really not worth it to my dignity, 2) If I goof off, someone else would have to pick up my slack, 3) never burn any bridges, and 4) I would have to be nearly completely unproductive for my company to do something. So instead, I landed a new job and quit my old j*b last week. It's true that when you resign, you get nothing. But my pride was intact, which in retrospect, was important to me.
__________________
GoodSense is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2010, 02:58 AM   #29
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
obgyn65's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: midwestern city
Posts: 4,061
I agree with this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambler View Post
I think that if I were you, I would probably talk to my boss candidly, saying something to the effect that you were considering retiring in the next "couple of years or so" and would be happy to volunteer for the next RIF so that the jobs of people who perhaps may need them more may be saved.
R
__________________
Very conservative with investments. Not ER'd yet, 48 years old. Please do not take anything I write or imply as legal, financial or medical advice directed to you. Contact your own financial advisor, healthcare provider, or attorney for financial, medical and legal advice.
obgyn65 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2010, 08:12 AM   #30
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 233
I agree with the people who said not to try to get fired. My company had an early buy-out right before it was taken over. If you stayed and gambled that you would be one of the thousands that were let go after the buy-out, the package was more. A couple more years was added to your age and service for your pension. Depending on your situation this could have added a lot or a little to it.

I was just a year and a half shy of the age to take the early retirement package. I would have very much preferred to have taken it though it would have cost me 3% of my pension.

The reasons I feel this way are:

1) Having no control over what was happening to me was very stressful.
2) I couldn't plan for it since I didn't know what was going to happen. The early retirees got a least a month or more to make plans and "adjust".
3) Even though you know you didn't do anything "wrong" going through the process with HR and my boss felt "awful". Instead of celebrating 30 years of my "working" life ending and a new beginning, I had 15 minutes to "clean out my desk". It still hurts a little when I think about it.

which brings me to:
4) I'm not one for parties but I missed out on the company sponsored retirement party that they had for people. I went to a few for other people and the really nice thing about them was people who you used to work with (that you had forgotten about) showed up.

plus I didn't get any of the "fun" people had saying good-bye, knowing they were retiring and that great "I'm going on vacation forever" feeling.

Some of this might sound petty but until you actually go through it, you don't know how you will feel. I liked my job and the people who I worked with. Maybe that makes a difference.

Your boss knows by your age that you are probably a "short timer". My two cents would be go to him/her and explain that you like working there but you wouldn't mind a package. That way if they do need to downsize they will keep you in mind but they don't know when you plan to retire.
__________________
Corporate ORphan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2010, 03:37 PM   #31
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: France
Posts: 1,195
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarah in SC View Post
Ready, this was posted on the ER.org Facebook page. Maybe it will help.
How to Get Laid Off: A Step-By-Step Guide | Wise Bread
Having seen that article, particularly the second half, I now know what quite a few of my colleagues have been reading.
__________________
Age 56, retired July 1, 2012; DW is 60 and working for 2 more years. Current portfolio is 2000K split 50 stocks/20 bonds/30 cash. Renting house, no debts.
BigNick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2010, 08:47 PM   #32
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
easysurfer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 7,891
Finances aside, in my opinion, I think there's some satisfaction in leaving on your own terms. I think if you are ready to FIRE, then if the megacorp just happens to offer a retirement package, then that's just icing on the cake. On the otherhand, if you can go "Read or Not, I'm FIRE'ing on my own terms..." that's rewarding too in itself.
__________________
Have you ever seen a headstone with these words
"If only I had spent more time at work" ... from "Busy Man" sung by Billy Ray Cyrus
easysurfer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2010, 10:11 PM   #33
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Hua Hin, Thailand
Posts: 523
I don't understand the talk about getting fired. OP said people who were laid off got severance.

I agree with others who say if the company treated you well then don't try to get let go just for the severance.

You said ER in 2011. I have a suggestion, based only on my personal experience. When I knew my last job was in fact going to be my last job I adopted a 'don't worry, be happy' attitude. Ignored office politics and gossip. Focused on the parts of the job I enjoyed and put minimum effort and time into the rest of it. Ignored pressure to work harder (I was a computer programmer who knew many studies have shown that when programmers work more than they want to the bug rate skyrockets. On past jobs I usually ignored the pressure, but this time it didn't cause me stress). Turned out I liked the job and income enough to postpone ER. But, if I'd been offered a severance package during that period ....
__________________
ItDontMeanAThing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2010, 07:29 PM   #34
Dryer sheet aficionado
Raygun99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Rockwall,
Posts: 41
Take the high road and be patient if you can. Worked for MegaCorp 30 years age 56. Started telling upper management that I wanted to slow down and thought it would be good to help in some transition type projects to help in the case I was gone. In return I only asked if RIF was ever available, "Please feel free to pick me" They swore THAT would never happen!! Age 58 2009 the BIG RIFs came, and while they were apologizing I was smiling: Going on second year and life is so great. Freedom to do so many things while I am still young and health and the early pension checks just keep on coming. I felt like I left with dignity, pride and a lot of friends thankful that their new roles were easier to manage because I trained them to replace me for two years.
__________________

__________________
Zacchaeus Come Down From That Tree
Raygun99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
FIRE or Retire as an Expat chinaco Life after FIRE 31 09-18-2008 08:42 PM
Diamond - ethical question JustMeUC Other topics 43 09-05-2008 03:30 PM
Ethical??? Caroline Other topics 14 07-15-2008 12:53 PM
FIRE vs. Semi-Retire maddythebeagle Young Dreamers 28 09-19-2005 07:22 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:34 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.