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...Giving Notice Next Week
Old 11-24-2015, 02:17 PM   #1
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...Giving Notice Next Week

Hi - I've been on the forum for a while, posting here and there, but mainly consuming the wealth of info that others provide.

I have decided that I want to be done.....FIRE'd...just like many of you here.
I am financially good according to FireCalc, RIP, and my own spreadsheet. And most important of all my DW is encouraging it due to the many nights I come home in a bad mood because of the BS at the office, not to mention the Sunday night funk in anticipation (dread) of another week.

I am not exactly sure how my manager will react. I have given no indication to anyone of my plans; I just think it's best that way. I am heading up his most important program him and he keeps telling me to "keep doing the good things that you are doing". My desired reaction from him would be something like 'Thanks for your service and have a good life', although I anticipate that he will ask me to stay longer.

I really want to be done, but I also don't want to leave him high and dry. At the same time I realize that in a MegaCorp of my employer's size someone else can be found. I guess I am expecting a question like 'what will it take to get you to stay a little longer? I am giving two months notice.

Have any of you been in similar situations and how have you handled it? I don't want to make it seem like a money grab, but I would want to be compensated for staying longer than the next two months.

TIA for any advice.
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Old 11-24-2015, 02:30 PM   #2
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Congratulations! I think 2 months is plenty. Even if they can't find a permanent replacement (well, as permanent as these jobs are!), they can find someone to work with you on the interim and you can document what you know. If they can't, do the best you can to document everything and get the heck out. If you offered to be available by phone after that (with some limits that you set), would they abuse it?

I have a brother who did the OMY for a few years and then when he finally did give notice was persuaded to work for another month at essentially double pay; he wanted to leave when his accumulated vacation started and they told him they'd pay him vacation pay plus regular pay. They hadn't named a replacement by the end but he left anyway. That was a year ago and he and DSIL bought a house on a lake; he makes furniture and sails his boat, and she fosters kittens for the local shelter. The company is surviving without him.

Don't let them drag it out for you. Sometimes the money isn't worth it.
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Old 11-24-2015, 02:34 PM   #3
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Even if you gave them a year's advance notice, they wouldn't start seriously looking until a week or so before your scheduled departure. Don't worry about it, we all over estimate our self worth.
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Old 11-24-2015, 02:39 PM   #4
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I agree. The max I plan to give is 2 months when I go. If they want you there longer you might want to ask them to sweeten the deal. Not having to accept any given terms will give you the freedom to up the ante if you want to. Also remember that sometimes staying longer as a lame duck can eventually turn others negative as they are reminded of your coming departure. It's usually better to leave when the news is fresh everyone (at least the subset of the everyone that matter to you) is still happy for you.
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Old 11-24-2015, 02:46 PM   #5
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I would just do whatever is best for you, whether it is leaving ASAP or sticking around a little longer for extra money if they will come through and id doesn't dent your plans for retirement. If the money isn't important then walk away happy and enjoy the freedom.
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Old 11-24-2015, 03:04 PM   #6
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Thanks all for the responses thus far. To clarify, I'm not looking for input as to whether 2 months notice is appropriate, but what should I consider if the response is 'can you stay a little longer'.
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Old 11-24-2015, 03:07 PM   #7
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If you offered to be available by phone after that (with some limits that you set), would they abuse it?
Thanks athena53...I can't say for certain whether it would be abused, but I personally would not want to be tethered to a phone. Thanks for the suggestion.
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Old 11-24-2015, 03:12 PM   #8
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I told mine when ask what they could do to make me stay, nothing I was done, tired of wearing shoes.
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Old 11-24-2015, 03:13 PM   #9
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To clarify, I'm not looking for input as to whether 2 months notice is appropriate, but what should I consider if the response is 'can you stay a little longer'.
Your response should be whatever YOU think/feel it should be. None of us will have to work beyond your planned retirement date - only you understand what working longer would mean to your mental health.
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Old 11-24-2015, 03:17 PM   #10
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Make the decision easier for yourself. Book a trip you have always wanted to take. You won't want to cancel it.
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Old 11-24-2015, 03:27 PM   #11
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A couple of thoughts on things you could ask for: being kept on the company health insurance (including company contributions) for X months after you leave; working 3-day weeks for X weeks beyond the 2 months but with pay and benefits that you now get working FT.
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Even if they ask, more time can be counterproductive
Old 11-24-2015, 03:49 PM   #12
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Even if they ask, more time can be counterproductive

Sometimes acquiescing to additional time is not good for the company. It ends up seeming less urgent to find your replacement.

I know someone who gave 7 weeks' notice (only four were required). The company asked her for an additional 4 weeks, which - in spite of it interfering with some important family timing - friend said "Yes, but then I need to take off a couple of weeks before I leave because I have some things I need to do."

They agreed.

Then the extra three weeks turned into four. So many unanticipated emergencies happened at work, friend did not get to take off much of the promised vacation time, and was working horrendous hours (part of the reason she was leaving).

They did not even post her job for three weeks (after someone tipped off the CEO that no move to advertise for a replacement had been made).

Essentially, the extra time my friend gave was squandered...
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Old 11-24-2015, 04:21 PM   #13
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what should I consider if the response is 'can you stay a little longer'.
I would ask why. Specifically, what do they want me to do that couldn't be done within the two month period?

If there is no good answer to that, it probably means they are just trying to put off the search for a replacement because they have their own problems to deal with right now.
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Old 11-24-2015, 04:46 PM   #14
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Thanks all for the responses thus far. To clarify, I'm not looking for input as to whether 2 months notice is appropriate, but what should I consider if the response is 'can you stay a little longer'.
Sorry, misread it. I guess my thought on that is the same as Braumeister. Ask yourself why you would stay longer unless there is something going on about which you aren't aware. If you understand the position and the current work and you decided that two months was the right number to finish up, what would change that?

The second part of my response is still relevant.
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Old 11-24-2015, 04:57 PM   #15
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.......... I don't want to make it seem like a money grab, but I would want to be compensated for staying longer than the next two months............
Sometimes it is hard to comprehend that we are FREE! No more acquiescing just to get along, no more giving into the boss. If you are done, just go!
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Old 11-24-2015, 05:03 PM   #16
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You said you were financially good and really want to be done so why not just say no if they ask you to stay.
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Old 11-24-2015, 05:07 PM   #17
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I learnt the hard way that if you really want to leave, you need to stick to your guns. I agreed to stay an extra month, which delayed the sale of my house. Unfortunately, by that time, supply exceeded demand. There were 30 new listings in my neighbourhood the week my house went on the market. Whatever I earned in that extra month was eaten up by the price discount on my house. Essentially I worked an extra month for nothing.
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Old 11-25-2015, 12:12 AM   #18
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First, congratulations Trooper on the beginning of the end! This is not a bad problem to have, but it's good you are thinking this through before "negotiating" with the boss. Perhaps it's like negotiating at the car dealer. You need to know your "walk away" price beforehand. What's the longest you are willing to stay, regardless of any perks?? What's the shortest?? What perks do you want thrown in, if any? In the end, it's just business...

On the other hand, if this seems like too much fooling around, you can just state your 2-months as a final offer. It almost sounds like you aren't sure about your 2 month timeline, otherwise you can just respectfully decline any counteroffer. What can they do, fire you?

I left in less than 2 weeks, declining a tepid counteroffer that was more of a conversational courtesy than a retention attempt. Mini-Mega management was almost as glad to be rid of me as I was overjoyed to be free!

Good luck and please remember that you are in the driver's seat.

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Old 11-25-2015, 12:14 AM   #19
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I learnt the hard way that if you really want to leave, you need to stick to your guns. I agreed to stay an extra month, which delayed the sale of my house. Unfortunately, by that time, supply exceeded demand. There were 30 new listings in my neighbourhood the week my house went on the market. Whatever I earned in that extra month was eaten up by the price discount on my house. Essentially I worked an extra month for nothing.
Ouch, "no good deed goes unpunished"

Sorry, I'm flashing back to my cynical w*rk self.

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Old 11-25-2015, 08:09 AM   #20
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I think being honest is important.

It sounds like you are done, done but you don't want to let him or the team down.

I'd turn it down like this:
"I appreciate that you value my expertise, but I think it would be disingenuous of me to pretend that additional compensation (or whatever) would be a positive motivation. At best I'd be a mercenary... At worst I'd resent it. Im confident there's other people that can do it and maybe me leaving will be a catalyst for them to step up. Either way I have to be honest with you and myself."

Something like that. Assuming that's how you feel.

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