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Going, Going, Gone?
Old 01-25-2012, 09:53 PM   #1
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Going, Going, Gone?

Hello everyone,

I'm seriously thinking about joining the class of 2012.

I waffled twice in 2011. I set a retirement date for myself in May 2011, and then again in September. Each time, inertia and fear did me in. I'm ready for a new phase of life, but it's damn scary. Hopefully you guys will talk me down from the ledge this time.

With no defined benefit other than eventual Social Security, I'll be doing this on my own savings. I'm lucky that early on, I somehow always distinguished between needs and wants, because I didn't really know what I was doing in the stock market most of the way. I just signed up for every savings opportunity at work, maxed them out, and randomly picked funds. I've never made a six-figure income, but somehow I now have enough saved to meet my expenses with 3-4% withdrawal rate, without counting Social Security. Autopilot worked for me. I was never consciously planning for retirement until the last 10 years, and only had any clue what I was really doing the last five. Right after I realized that ER might be possible, 2008-09 knocked the wind of of my sails, and I gave up the dream pretty quickly. I avoided thinking or reading about retirement for quite a while. But now I'm back and determined.

At some point I read a little on asset allocation, and now am an index fund investor. For my age (56) and situation (no pension), I'm too heavily invested in stocks, and need to work through reallocating everything appropriately. I had hoped to have a new asset allocation figured out before retiring fully, but I'm not there yet. I have two years of expenses in cash to live on, so I think I'll go ahead with retiring, move most accounts to a Vanguard target date fund, and then work on a more sophisticated allocation as an early ER project. Crazy?

I've had two substantially different careers. I was in a creative but low paying job field for 23 years, including 16 at one company. When I left that firm in about 1997, I had $125K in the 401K. In the exit interview, I remember the HR rep opening her eyes wide and saying "that's MUCH more than most people have." I really had no idea if it was a lot or a little.

I then was self-employed for a few years, "reinvented" myself, and have been at megacorp in an IT job for 12 years. It's been a good place to save money, but I never bonded with the job, I'm burned out and won't miss it. I can stay on their health insurance by using Cobra for the next 18 months, after which I can rejoin the group plan at exorbitant rates, paying the full cost, until I'm eligible for Medicare.

I don't intend to pull the rug out from under my coworkers, but have read some of the cautionary tales here of providing too much advance warning. I intend to give six weeks notice, which is a compromise between not torturing myself, and providing a reasonable transition period at work. I'm thinking of timing this so my last day just before my birthday.

Occupying my time is the least of my worries. I can't wait to live life on my own schedule. I'm not a morning person, and have struggled to get to myself to work on time for 35 years. I'm looking forward be able to stay up late to finish watching a movie, grocery shop at off hours, and not deal with arbitrary work deadlines.

There are very few people I feel comfortable discussing ER with, so I'm grateful this group is here and look forward to learning and sharing with you.

I've never used dryer sheets. A little static never bothered me.

-CK
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Old 01-25-2012, 10:07 PM   #2
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Welcome CK. We have many similarities in that I am also 56 and deferred my long held plan a year due to 2008-2009 and to sell our home, and my last day on payroll will be Feb 1. As I told a coworker today, it is a combination of sad, scary and exciting all in one.

You seem to be where I was months ago. I was confident that I was financially prepared but still leery of making the jump. You just gotta pull the trigger (and be firm). And yes, it is still scary - but so what!!
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Old 01-25-2012, 10:15 PM   #3
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Wow...what a great first post! I think my first post was on the lines of...'hi, I'm new here'.

Jump in and hang on CitizenK...welcome to the forum.
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Old 01-25-2012, 11:29 PM   #4
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Welcome to the forum.

I was in a position similar to yours - just savings, and no SS for the next 2 years at least. And, like you, the job was really getting me down with its stressful demands, long commute, and frequent international travel.


Went ahead and pulled the ripcord last April. Yes, there was some moment of anxiety as my wife does not work, so we had to ensure our savings supported us until SS kicks in - in 2013.

But thus far, things have been good. I am so much more relaxed, and not having to beat the crowds or worry about commuting in stormy weather, is great. Doing what I want to, when I want to can't be beat. The only bummer was the lack of a paycheck, and high cost of private health insurance.

If you feel confident in your savings and SWR until SS starts, then I say - go for it. And congrats for being able to achieve ER.
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Old 01-25-2012, 11:49 PM   #5
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Wow...what a great first post! I think my first post was on the lines of...'hi, I'm new here'.
I looked it up, and you were feeling thankful for our wit & wisdom. How long did that last?

You were also trying to figure out how to post & reply. That seemed to work itself out.

For some reason this board's search software only goes back 8000 posts. Search it while you still can!
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Old 01-26-2012, 05:22 AM   #6
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Hi, CitizenK. Welcome to the forum. It sounds like you are ready to join the dark side. You will find lots of members willing to answer any questions you have, and if you search the files you will also find past threads that can be helpful. Good luck!
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Old 01-26-2012, 06:57 AM   #7
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It sounds like you've factored it in, but just to play safe: Do you know the hard numbers regarding your medical insurance, and can your withdrawal rate support that? If so, it sound slike you're ready. Of course, this is coming from someone who is targeting December of this year and already is getting some cold feet.
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Old 01-26-2012, 08:43 AM   #8
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Welcome -
I think your plan to have 2 years cash and stick everything into a Target fund is fine until you get an AA plan you are comfortable with. The target fund is probably not perfect, but it's pretty good, and easy. Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good.
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Old 01-26-2012, 11:24 AM   #9
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I looked it up, and you were feeling thankful for our wit & wisdom. How long did that last?

You were also trying to figure out how to post & reply. That seemed to work itself out.


Well, I'm still here and no....it didn't take me long to get into the swing of things. Seems to me, at the time you were the moderator for the 'Hi I Am' segment of the forum. Ahhhhh....memories.....
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For some reason this board's search software only goes back 8000 posts. Search it while you still can!
What...you mean to tell me at some point my pearls of wisdom and wit will not be easily accessible? Oh the humanity of it all!
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Old 01-26-2012, 07:03 PM   #10
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Thanks to everyone for the warm welcome.

pb4uski
Fantastic, congrats on your impending retirement next Wednesday. Hopefully the sad and scary will pass quickly, and you can move right on to the exciting. Keep us informed on what the first few weeks are like. it's inspirational. Hopefully I'll be just a few months behind you.

bbbamI
Wow, almost 8000 posts. Thanks for the welcome. Can't wait to jump in.

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Doing what I want to, when I want to can't be beat. The only bummer was the lack of a paycheck, and high cost of private health insurance.
Coolius
It sounds like you are adapting well well to not working. I can relate to everything you said. I think we will share the same likes and bummers.

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It sounds like you've factored it in, but just to play safe: Do you know the hard numbers regarding your medical insurance, and can your withdrawal rate support that?
mystang52
I got the health insurance numbers from our HR department a few weeks ago. It's in the budget, but Ouch! The COBRA costs are 6K annually. The early retiree group cost is $9400. I also have a $2K long term care policy. Health insurance will be my largest expense category.

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The target fund is probably not perfect, but it's pretty good, and easy. Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good.
LiquidSapphire
This is reassuring, thanks. I can definitely get stuck when faced with too many options. It's too overwhelming to get to "perfect," but I can probably get to "good."

Michael
Thanks for the welcome. I'm reading the FAQs and following some other threads… a lot to catch up on.
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Old 01-28-2012, 08:43 AM   #11
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Hi CitizenK, and welcome.

You will find lots of people here who are, or have been, in your situation. It's comforting to know that others have gone through the "Just One More Year" syndrome and successfully made the plunge. Use the search fearure and read some of the older posts about things that concern you - there is an amazing amount of wisdom and humor here.
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Old 01-28-2012, 03:36 PM   #12
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What...you mean to tell me at some point my pearls of wisdom and wit will not be easily accessible? Oh the humanity of it all! :laugh
The vast majority of my wisdom & wit is no longer accessible either!
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Old 01-28-2012, 03:44 PM   #13
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I waffled twice in 2011. I set a retirement date for myself in May 2011, and then again in September. Each time, inertia and fear did me in.
I can understand that. I have pretty much made up my mind to retire at the end of the current school year. I get a lot of help towards that decision from various negative issues, but I also enjoy the basic art of teaching and seeing a young sprout beam with pleasure when he/she understands a concept. Still, it's time for me to go off to another phase of life and let a new teacher leave the ranks of substitutes and get a regular job.

I have not yet signed the paper that says "This is it. It's over for me. I am leaving and am not coming back (except as a substitute from time to time.)" It's hard to give up 40 years of the working habit. Perhaps, if I had spent more time as a beach bum, or backpacking through exotic foreign countries, it would be easier.
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Old 01-28-2012, 04:21 PM   #14
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Hi CK - great post. You sound a lot like me. I am also 56, and after close to 40 years of working full-time (yes, even in high school), and after 28 years with an IT MegaCorp, I officially gave my retirement notice 12 days ago. I will join the Class of 2012 on March 1! WaHoo!!!

I've been toying around with the idea for more than a year now - and I've got to say that reading all the great inspiration from the fine people on this forum is what gave me the courage to finally pull the trigger. And yes, I'm a bit scared, but more excited than scared.

I'm blessed with a small pension - maybe 20% or so of my final salary, for which I am very grateful. But like you, most of it will come from my savings. I'm a Fidelity customer, so I use their Retirement Income Planner tool and for me, it's the best tool I've found, and I've tried a lot of them. I am not a savvy investor by any stretch. And I have very little tolerance for volatility. So as far as asset allocation, I use a 4 bucket strategy: I keep 3 years of expenses totally liquid in a money market account at my credit union in Bucket One. Bucket Two is for years 4-7 of retirement expenses, and it is in a Fidelity asset allocation fund invested 20% stocks/80% bonds. Bucket Three is for years 7-10 and is also in an asset allocation fund at 30% stocks/70% bonds. Beyond 10 years is Bucket Four, i.e., the rest, and that is all in a 50/50 asset allocation fund. So I basically have 10 years of very conservative investments, and this is how I am able to sleep at night. I plan to rebalance and replenish these buckets annually, sourcing from the (hopefully) most profitable bucket(s).

I too am burnt out on IT - in fact, would rather chop wood at this point! But it has been a very good career, and I'm grateful for that as well. We lost our retiree medical benefits several years ago (except a handful of very long term employees), but they funded a future health account for us which we can use to pay for employer-sponsored medical insurance at full cost. A very high-deductible PPO will cost over 17K a year for premiums for my wife and I. The deductible is either 5K or 7.5K - can't remember at the moment.

I agree with you that I don't think I will have any problem occupying my time either. In fact, I can wear myself out just thinking about all the possibilities, and reading about what other folks are doing!

So CK - my recommendation to you and to me is....let's do it!!!! I'll be interested to hear how things go for you. Best of everything.

Sincerely,
Pete
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Old 01-29-2012, 11:18 PM   #15
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Hi CK - great post. You sound a lot like me. I am also 56, and after close to 40 years of working full-time (yes, even in high school), and after 28 years with an IT MegaCorp, I officially gave my retirement notice 12 days ago. I will join the Class of 2012 on March 1! WaHoo!!!

I've been toying around with the idea for more than a year now - and I've got to say that reading all the great inspiration from the fine people on this forum is what gave me the courage to finally pull the trigger. And yes, I'm a bit scared, but more excited than scared.

I'm blessed with a small pension - maybe 20% or so of my final salary, for which I am very grateful. But like you, most of it will come from my savings. I'm a Fidelity customer, so I use their Retirement Income Planner tool and for me, it's the best tool I've found, and I've tried a lot of them. I am not a savvy investor by any stretch. And I have very little tolerance for volatility. So as far as asset allocation, I use a 4 bucket strategy: I keep 3 years of expenses totally liquid in a money market account at my credit union in Bucket One. Bucket Two is for years 4-7 of retirement expenses, and it is in a Fidelity asset allocation fund invested 20% stocks/80% bonds. Bucket Three is for years 7-10 and is also in an asset allocation fund at 30% stocks/70% bonds. Beyond 10 years is Bucket Four, i.e., the rest, and that is all in a 50/50 asset allocation fund. So I basically have 10 years of very conservative investments, and this is how I am able to sleep at night. I plan to rebalance and replenish these buckets annually, sourcing from the (hopefully) most profitable bucket(s).

I too am burnt out on IT - in fact, would rather chop wood at this point! But it has been a very good career, and I'm grateful for that as well. We lost our retiree medical benefits several years ago (except a handful of very long term employees), but they funded a future health account for us which we can use to pay for employer-sponsored medical insurance at full cost. A very high-deductible PPO will cost over 17K a year for premiums for my wife and I. The deductible is either 5K or 7.5K - can't remember at the moment.

I agree with you that I don't think I will have any problem occupying my time either. In fact, I can wear myself out just thinking about all the possibilities, and reading about what other folks are doing!

So CK - my recommendation to you and to me is....let's do it!!!! I'll be interested to hear how things go for you. Best of everything.

Sincerely,
Pete
Pete.
Thanks for sharing this, and congrats.

I've read a little bit about buckets. I don't have a fully realized plan yet, but have been thinking in terms of time buckets. 57-59.5 (when I can access IRA funds), then to 62 (or whenever I take Social Security), and then to 70.5 (RMDs). I still need to work on asset allocations and a plan for spending from various accounts. To date, I've had a pretty high risk tolerance, but that will dial back as I enter the spending phase.

And I'm fortunate to have the safety net of a significant other who is still working. Though we share some housing and food expenses, our finances are largely separate, so my early retirement is still on me. But it helps to know that there's someone who is supportive of my retirement plans, and won't let me starve.

I'm almost giddy at the thought of giving notice. I'm curious... What reaction did you get from your management and coworkers? Did you tell other people at work after you gave notice, or did the word just leak out? I think I'd rather just go out quietly, without answering lots of questions, but that's probably unrealistic.

CK
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Old 01-30-2012, 08:35 AM   #16
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Hi CK - yes, it's a big deal to enter this spending phase. For decades you and I have been saving - as you indicated in your first post, not even with a real plan, but we knew it was the right thing to do - somehow that was engrained in us - maybe something we saw our parents do? Or not do? And now to enter into spending - it's big. Not that I constantly checked on my net worth, but I knew it was growing, and now it will be shrinking! You see, my plan is a "die broke" plan - I want to either spend or give all of it away before I die (as if I know when I'm going to die - HA!)

My wife retired two years ago from the same megacorp (after 34 years!) but she, unlike me, jumped into an "encore career" which she is passionate about - personal fitness and training. She's as busy as she wants to be - other boomers immediately relate to her (she's also 56 years old) and it's a joy to see her having so much fun. Doesn't bring in a lot of money, but I am surprised at what it does bring in - pleasantly surprised!

The reaction from my boss? It was all about him. He literally went silent (he's in Texas, I'm in Colo. so this was on the phone), and I'm sure it was because he was wondering how he was going to replace the revenue that I was bringing in for him. Anymore, a backfill is not automatic by any means - management is lucky if they can come up with a convincing enough business case to replace an employee who is leaving. The norm is for everyone else in the dept. to just step up and absorb the workload. He tried talking me out of it, but I was ready for this and let him know that I had made up my mind - 'twas not negotiable. I finally had to say to him, "John (not real name), I was hoping you'd be happy for me!" That snapped him out of it and he congratulated me. Now mind you, me and this guy are not real close - I've worked for him for a number of years now, but we've never actually met in person as our organization is now largely a remote, virtual one.

I let a couple people know, but am mostly just letting it leak out. I requested no congratulatory letters, but if anyone wanted to email me or stay in touch, to please let me know before March 1! Again I'm like you CK - would also rather just go out quietly! And since my dept. all either works from home or at customer locations, for me, I think I can sneak out without much fanfare!

So, on giving your notice - I'd say don't have any expectations. That way you won't be upset if you get a rather selfish response like I did, and you'll be pleasantly surprised if your boss sincerely congratulates and is happy for you! And I am giddy for you! Let us know when you actually do it!

Pete
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Old 01-30-2012, 09:36 AM   #17
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Do you already know you cannot qualify for individual health insurance? Is it worth talking to a broker to see what they can find for you? It's free and there is not commitment.

Given how long you have to reach Medicare eligibility, I would be concerned about your employer ending retiree health insurance. I lived in a town with a large contingent of retirees from a division of Philips. One day they received a letter their retiree healthcare was ending in 30 days. 30 days!!!

A nice thing about retiring at 55+ is you have penalty-free access to your 401(k) should you decide to leave the funds with your employer. Maybe you can roll out a portion of your funds and leave a portion. Sometimes 401(k)'s have guaranteed return funds with better rates than you can get on your own. That might be a good place to park that portion of your overall AA.

Good luck!
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Old 01-30-2012, 09:41 AM   #18
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Yep. Lots of stuff declines as you age...
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Old 01-31-2012, 09:07 PM   #19
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You see, my plan is a "die broke" plan - I want to either spend or give all of it away before I die (as if I know when I'm going to die - HA!)

So, on giving your notice - I'd say don't have any expectations. That way you won't be upset if you get a rather selfish response like I did, and you'll be pleasantly surprised if your boss sincerely congratulates and is happy for you! And I am giddy for you! Let us know when you actually do it!

Pete
Hello Pete,
Yes sir... if we knew how long we have, the math would be a whole heck of a lot easier.

I'm really not looking forward to the process of resigning, but the reward will be worth it, so I guess it just comes with the territory. I searched and read other posts about people giving notice at their companies, and see that it varied from immediately leaving to years of notice.

Not sure if I'll go through with it yet, but I'm thinking about giving six weeks notice this Friday. There's no real reason to wait.

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Do you already know you cannot qualify for individual health insurance? Is it worth talking to a broker to see what they can find for you? It's free and there is not commitment.

Given how long you have to reach Medicare eligibility, I would be concerned about your employer ending retiree health insurance. I lived in a town with a large contingent of retirees from a division of Philips. One day they received a letter their retiree healthcare was ending in 30 days. 30 days!!!

A nice thing about retiring at 55+ is you have penalty-free access to your 401(k) should you decide to leave the funds with your employer. Maybe you can roll out a portion of your funds and leave a portion. Sometimes 401(k)'s have guaranteed return funds with better rates than you can get on your own. That might be a good place to park that portion of your overall AA.

Good luck!
Hello Buckeye,
I haven't shopped for an individual policy, though I can see that it would be worthwhile if only to know my options. Given the business my company is in, I can't see them dropping retiree insurance, but they certainly reserve that right in their plan documents. For the Cobra period, I have several thousand flex dollars to spend, so that's an incentive to use that for now. I do have a couple of fallback health insurance options I'll discuss in another post.

Thanks for pointing out the 401k idea also. My plan does have a good choice of funds.
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Old 01-31-2012, 10:16 PM   #20
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There's no real reason to wait.
The only caveat would be if you thought you were going to be laid off, in which case you'd jump up & down waving your hands in the air lay low until they give you the layoff notice.

Many have given longer notice with the best of intentions for orderly turnover and training of reliefs. Usually Megacorp hasn't been anywhere ready to uphold their side of that bargain, so be ready to spend a lot of time working on your own projects while the chain of command fumbles around to identify who's taking over for you.
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