Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-27-2014, 09:54 PM   #41
Dryer sheet wannabe
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 10
Francis, can you semi-retire, perhaps? Maybe just work prn? I am a pharmacist, too, but about 12 years younger. This is something I am already contemplating, hopefully in the next few years. Pharmacy has definitely changed in the past 20 years since I started.


Sent from my iPad using Early Retirement Forum
__________________

__________________
mointx is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 11-27-2014, 10:10 PM   #42
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,472
Quote:
Originally Posted by Francis View Post
Thanks for your perspective. Pharmacy has changed a lot. About 10 years ago I worked with an oldtimer who owned his own pharmacy. He said he could earn a decent living filling 50 prescriptions a day. Today many pharmacists I know who work for chains fill 600+ prescriptions per day.
Just like us in medicine, the bean counters that now run the show want us to do more and more with less and less. I just did a continuing education course on patient safety about the pitfalls of distractions, as they can cause errors. I'm sure the same thing applies to you. It's scary to think our patients count on us to make no errors but we no longer have time to double check our work to prevent errors.
__________________

__________________
EastWest Gal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2014, 12:59 AM   #43
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Laguna Hills
Posts: 137
EastWest Gal as you doubtlessly know what you describe is typical in the medical industry with emphasis on the word industry. As an MD in a medium size my particular multi hospital megacorp the latest invented wrinkle that galls me is an invented concept of "perfect care". LOL. We actually have a perfect care committee, arbitrary parameters to establish scores to identify outliers etc... Of course a majority of the input is from bean counters and consultants hired by the bean counters. It is truly amusing in a way because both for financial and quality parameters we have huge talent in the system that would give much better input than the consultants, actually care and take personal responsibility for outcomes.

Francis I am in a similar situation to you. I could FIRE at any time, not at the WR you can but with enough cushion that money is no longer the primary issue. The only thing that keeps me in the game is a series of projects I am involved in that just may improve the work environment for my younger colleagues and improve patient care. Hate to admit it but would also be good for the megacorp bottom line.

If you have the opportunity to keep working in a position that empowers you to improve the working environment for you, your patients and you colleagues I can understand sticking it out for a while. Otherwise whats the point? If your job is a hopeless, heartless deadend as described in your earlier posts it is inconceivable that you could not find more happiness in a secure retirement doing whatever you discover makes you happy.
__________________
longranger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2014, 11:55 AM   #44
Dryer sheet aficionado
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by mointx View Post
Francis, can you semi-retire, perhaps? Maybe just work prn? I am a pharmacist, too, but about 12 years younger. This is something I am already contemplating, hopefully in the next few years. Pharmacy has definitely changed in the past 20 years since I started.


Sent from my iPad using Early Retirement Forum
Good Thought. Present employer may or may not allow this. Technically we are allowed to drop as low as 32 hours/week and still are considered full time (for benefits) But I've known pharmacists who tried to reduce their hours and management said, "sorry but there are no pharmacist positions posted for 32 hours/week".
__________________
Francis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2014, 12:04 PM   #45
Dryer sheet aficionado
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by longranger View Post
Francis I am in a similar situation to you. I could FIRE at any time, not at the WR you can but with enough cushion that money is no longer the primary issue. The only thing that keeps me in the game is a series of projects I am involved in that just may improve the work environment for my younger colleagues and improve patient care. Hate to admit it but would also be good for the megacorp bottom line.
Yeah, there's no projects I can be involved with to improve working conditions. Nor will there ever be. All projects involve improving profits. I may have a lower WR than you but mainly that's because I have low expenses. Could easily live on 25-30K/year.
__________________
Francis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2014, 05:11 PM   #46
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,050
Francis,

I have been emancipated from Megacorp for about a month.

As far as boredom goes, this is an issue that anyone who stops working will have to address. Delaying retirement just kicks the can down the road.

But...
My worst day after retirement is still better than my best day at work.
__________________
jim584672 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2014, 06:11 PM   #47
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: northern Michigan
Posts: 732
Quote:
Originally Posted by Francis View Post
I work in hospital pharmacy. It was a decent, even great job for years. A while ago a for profit hospital chain bought the hospital and things slowly but consistantly changed for years till it's at an intolerable level. The final blow, within the last year, was to make our schedule so outlandish in the hope that people quit. We have hired new pharmacists specifically to work odd hours - evenings and all nights. That was fine. Now, they are releasing all these new hires from their shifts and making us long term employees work the bad hours. Oh, let me add that they can hire the new pharmacists for about 25K less than the long term workers. So, it's like they want us out. Maybe that's why I can't make the break - because I don't want them to force me out.
I worked in a completely different field than you do, but I can relate to this, at least to some extent. I was being gradually pushed out of my job the last couple years I worked also (we had a change of management, whose top priority was to reorganize our agency, which involved cutting quite a few positions). My position was targeted for elimination, which at first made me angry. My initial reaction was similar to yours - wanting to hang in there, so as not to give them the satisfaction of forcing me out, or forcing me to change jobs. But then it dawned on me that that attitude was not constructive. I had planned to retire very soon anyway (even before the change of management), so trying to hang in there longer, when things were deteriorating rapidly, made no sense in my case. I retired as soon as I could after that, and have absolutely no regrets (after nearly 5 years now). I regularly talk to several former co-workers who are still working there, and they are all very unhappy with the new management. So, that just reinforces my decision to depart when I did.
__________________
RAE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2014, 06:36 PM   #48
Confused about dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 6
Francis - I retired two months before my 60th birthday in 2010 and haven't looked back. If I stayed at the job any longer I might have ended up with a nervous breakdown. Over the last four years volunteering has been fruitful and exciting.

You might want to check out this very interesting program offered by the Osher Institute at the University of North Carolina at Asheville called "Paths to a Creative Retirement." Here's the link - http://olliasheville.com/paths-creative-retirement
Topics are as follows:

When should I retire?
How will I spend my time after I stop or reduce my work?
How will I find purpose and meaning after I retire?
How will my identity change in retirement?
How will retirement affect my relationships with family and friends?
How do I investigate work and volunteer opportunities?

Another great resource is a recent book by Chris Farrell entitled: "Unretirement: How Baby Boomers are Changing the Way We Think About Work, Community, and the Good Life."

There are tons of resources available to assist you in your decision-making process. Good Luck!



Sent from my iPad using Early Retirement Forum
__________________
pbcoastal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2014, 07:23 PM   #49
Dryer sheet aficionado
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by RAE View Post
I worked in a completely different field than you do, but I can relate to this, at least to some extent. I was being gradually pushed out of my job the last couple years I worked also (we had a change of management, whose top priority was to reorganize our agency, which involved cutting quite a few positions). My position was targeted for elimination, which at first made me angry. My initial reaction was similar to yours - wanting to hang in there, so as not to give them the satisfaction of forcing me out, or forcing me to change jobs. But then it dawned on me that that attitude was not constructive. I had planned to retire very soon anyway (even before the change of management), so trying to hang in there longer, when things were deteriorating rapidly, made no sense in my case. I retired as soon as I could after that, and have absolutely no regrets (after nearly 5 years now). I regularly talk to several former co-workers who are still working there, and they are all very unhappy with the new management. So, that just reinforces my decision to depart when I did.
Thanks for sharing your experiences. There are similarities between our situations. You know, I think when all is said and done, I'd be much better and much happier away from my workplace. I think of all the people who left recently and none are trying to get back. I worked for the same place for my whole career of 30 years. I've been thinking a lot about this and I'm toying with packing it in for good in early July 2015.
__________________
Francis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2014, 06:17 AM   #50
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,472
It sounds like you're on solid ground and will be good to go. Why not RE? You have some great retirement hobbies listed on your profile. I look forward to more of your posts.
__________________

__________________
EastWest Gal is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
If You Could Live To Be 150 Years Old...... Major Tom Other topics 31 01-28-2014 07:02 PM
At 51---no retirement plan but could retire in 4 years Lily Byron Hi, I am... 112 02-18-2013 09:59 AM
52 years old; want to retire in 2-3 years Barb301 Hi, I am... 2 03-07-2008 09:02 AM
HELP- Financially incompetent 50 year old relative in massive IRS trouble A854321 FIRE and Money 41 09-27-2007 03:59 PM
How early can I retire-50 years old? vicmost Young Dreamers 20 02-21-2006 09:57 AM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:38 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.