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Old 03-09-2015, 12:15 PM   #41
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First off thank you for being a FF. I have the most respect for FF over any profession since you risk your life to save someone elses stuff.

I guess I'm lucky. Since I have said I will ER I have gotten nothing but congratulations and good wishes from my friends and family. While some might be jealous no one has mentioned a thing. only my Aunt has asked what will I do and that I am too young, then I reminded her that I will be ER a year later than her husband did :P. Naturally to her I will always be a young kid

Best of luck!
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Old 03-09-2015, 04:27 PM   #42
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I never really had any negative feedback. I stated my intentions pretty far in advance. My mom did mention that I was still pretty young and she thought I'd be bored, but I just took that as motherly advice, and she didn't harp on it...just mentioned it once or possibly twice over a long time period. What I did encounter was my supervisor and co-workers trying to convince me not to go...lol. They weren't negative about it, they just wanted me to stay (possibly because it was gonna be such a hassle to hire a new guy, with a big learning curve before he could fully contribute). However, I'd prefer to believe it was because they were going to miss me so much!

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Old 03-09-2015, 07:45 PM   #43
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I'm the same Myers Briggs type as you so I will tell you the guilt is an "NT" thing.
I'm going out in a few months at age 57 and my parents are horrified, only because they don't get why I don't want to work until I drop dead. Navigating the guilt will be the most challenging part, but take it day by day and I'm sure it will decrease over time.
Good luck!


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Old 03-09-2015, 08:00 PM   #44
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I'm the same Myers Briggs type as you so I will tell you the guilt is an "NT" thing.
I'm going out in a few months at age 57 and my parents are horrified, only because they don't get why I don't want to work until I drop dead. Navigating the guilt will be the most challenging part, but take it day by day and I'm sure it will decrease over time.
Good luck!


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Old 03-09-2015, 08:14 PM   #45
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Guilty conscience?
Nope, none at all. Earned the right to RE.
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Old 03-09-2015, 10:03 PM   #46
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Firefighting pays well!

$96,000 salary plus a annuity worth over $1,000,000 and $150 a month healthcare in retirement.

All for 20 years of work?

I think you chose your occupation very wisely and should enjoy your retirement.
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Old 03-09-2015, 10:10 PM   #47
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Guilt? That's funny. My dad asked my future brother-in-law what he did for a living. He answered, "I'm retired. You'll enjoy it when you get there."
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Old 03-09-2015, 10:41 PM   #48
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While my actual M-B type is also INTJ, I have adopted a new one: DGAS (don't give a sh!t). Makes any guilt or other issues seem to evaporate away. I have approx one more year, and think about retirement numerous times per day. Just keep focus on the goal!

Welcome to the forum, it sounds like you have it all pretty well planned out and ready for a new phase in life.

BTW, been working full time since i was 15, and part-time during school, including self-supporting student. I have already put in 36 years working, so no guilt getting out!
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Old 03-10-2015, 09:48 AM   #49
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When I first retired (hasn't been very long), I did harbor a little guilt. Especially when I would get the strange looks when folks asked what I was going to do workwise after retiring from the AF and I told them "nothing". But, I have recently remembered that guilt is one of the most useless human traits....and it's VERY human. So...I too adopt the DGAS attitude. Or as the young ones say today "Haters are goin' hate!".
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Old 03-12-2015, 06:49 AM   #50
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As for participating in the economy, isn't supplying capital by investing one's lifetime of savings in the markets an important service and contribution? Or is buying a mountain of plastic crap made in China the only way to participate?


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Old 03-12-2015, 09:20 AM   #51
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As for participating in the economy, isn't supplying capital by investing one's lifetime of savings in the markets an important service and contribution? Or is buying a mountain of plastic crap made in China the only way to participate?
Ah, but investment income is "unearned". Just look on any tax form. (I prefer to call it non-wage income.)

Most of us still contribute to the economy in retirement. Just take a look at the Travel board and the Health board (even those of us who are healthy tend to spend a lot on supplements, gym memberships, bicycling equipment, etc.). And some of us still splurge on occasion. The 2 pairs of Western boots I bought last weekend were made in the USA, bought from a bricks-and-mortar store in TX and sold to us by a very competent saleswoman who gave us good advice on how they should fit. I hope she made a nice commission.
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Old 03-12-2015, 10:01 AM   #52
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Around these parts, trust-funders are fairly common. They tend to be LYBM-ers so it's not unusual to see someone with a famous family name driving some old heap, and living quietly but comfortably.
( I wonder if having that multigenerational "pension" dulls the need to show off?)

So seeing a 40 yo without a job (and never really had one) is not questioned or saddled with the guilt-trip.
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Old 03-12-2015, 10:10 AM   #53
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Well, your parents may one day be very glad you're rested up and no longer tethered to a j*b when they need someone around.
+1

I love my parents, but it is amazing how quickly they forgot what it is like to have to go to a job 5 days a week, and get most other things done on the weekend. They also forgot how precious a few weeks of vacation a year are.
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Old 03-12-2015, 10:39 AM   #54
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@Chuckanut, sounds like my in-laws :-/


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Old 03-12-2015, 10:44 AM   #55
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Well, your parents may one day be very glad you're rested up and no longer tethered to a j*b when they need someone around.
Funny you mention this. Although retired, I do have things to do and I keep myself quite busy. My Dad, however, thinks that my new j*b is to tend to his every need which is a bit bothersome since he is still quite able to be independent and figure things out on his own.

A phone call will often go like so:

Me "Hello?"
Dad "Are you busy?"
Me "Yeah, a little bit. Is something wrong?"
Dad "Oh I'm sorry. Let me ask you (insert some stupid question here)"

I wish I knew of a polite way to tell him to bugger off, but I feel obliged.
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Old 03-12-2015, 02:16 PM   #56
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Funny you mention this. Although retired, I do have things to do and I keep myself quite busy. My Dad, however, thinks that my new j*b is to tend to his every need which is a bit bothersome since he is still quite able to be independent and figure things out on his own.

I wish I knew of a polite way to tell him to bugger off, but I feel obliged.
That's nice of you.

Since my RE, I look at helping out with mom's minor (daily) problems as now having the time for the opportunity to help the woman who had to deal with all my crap for 20+ years....I was not an easy child.

I know that one day, that phone will stop ringing, so each day is a gift.
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Old 03-12-2015, 02:28 PM   #57
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You've done a great job of setting yourself up to retire early and I wouldn't worry about what others think. I bet they are trying to make you feel guilty, because they are envious! I am getting ready to retire in June and my husband has been retired for a year. He has a nice pension, with survivor's benefits, which makes it possible for us to do this. Not to mention, we are also frugal and drive 10 year old cars. I don't feel guilty at all and you shouldn't either. You've earned it.
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Old 03-12-2015, 02:47 PM   #58
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Marko, you are very wise! I miss both my parents dearly & sure wish I could still be helping them)
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Old 03-12-2015, 05:08 PM   #59
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In 8 months I turn 50 and eligible to retire (FERS firefighter). INTJ personality type, the youngest of 4 siblings and the first one to retire. My pension will equal my sisterís fulltime income and about 80% of brotherís income. They think I am crazy to give up a well-paying, secure job. Half-jokingly referring to me as lazy, cheating the system and getting away with something I donít deserve. Co-workers (many living paycheck to paycheck) donít want to hear how I intentionally lived well below my means to ensure I could retire early.

In addition to the guilty conscience, Iím fretting over not I have enough money after retiring, which seems silly. If I never work again and my investments matched the inflation rate, I should have $45,000/year net until Iím 90 yrs old. Thatís $13,000/year more than what I am living on now. In 2008 I took a 4 year sabbatical (aka post-divorce, mid-life crisis, shortly after securing my 20 years as a firefighter), with no pension, small savings, no health insurance and no guarantee of any PT income. I managed just fine on $30,000/year PT income. Now I am expecting a pension that guarantees I can maintain my current spending in addition to a healthy nest egg and that same PT income potential and yet Iím worried about money. What the heck happened to me?

The Numbers:
Personal: Single (divorced in 2006 and no, he does not qualify to get any of my pension), no kids, one awesome dog, painfully frugal, fit and healthy.
Salary: $76,000 + $20,000 OT. Twice my needs.
Current expenses: $32,000/yr, $2650/mo (based on 6 years of religious tracking)
Debt: Zilch, zippo.
Savings: $120,000 cash, $300,000 IRA/401K (mutual & L funds). Yes, I should have more, but I am playing catch up after the divorce.
FERS Pension: $40,500 gross, $32,500 net after St/Fed tax and health ins. Includes COLAs.
PT Income potential: $20,000-30,000/year for 6 years.
Housing: I rent a 2 BR house w/ garage on 5 acres for $800/mo. Utilities inc.

Retirement plan:
Travel more. Road trips to visit family/friends, camping/hiking, exploring. I donít anticipate a significant increase in my expenses, except for car/moto gas & maint and 2-3 month cheap vaca rental.
A couple of months each winter in Mexico or other warm locale, camping or short-term rentals, as I did during my work sabbatical.
April thru October in current location to facilitate PT work which could be more that planned due to established work connections.
Keep renting, I know it seems silly to pay rent for a house Iím not using year around, but itís a great situation that would be hard to duplicate for the price. And I donít want to live out of a storage unit or a suitcase.
Initially, pull $6,500/yr. from savings to supplement pension for a total of $39,000/yr, $3250/mo. for $600/mo more than current.
Save PT income until reaching a cash total of $150,000+, likely to occur after 2-3 years. After that enjoy the rest of the income (or more likely, keep saving since I find it hard to spend money indiscriminately).
After age 56, consider using savings to buy a small place/condo where I can settle into full retirement. Or not.

Make sense?? See any wholes in my logic? Muchas gracias.
I retired FERS at 50 about five years ago with no guilt whatsoever. Afterwards I had a job with a govt contractor for about 10 months that really kind of s*cked so I swore off working for anyone else forever.

But I'm not the kind of person who feels like they always have to be doing something productive or actively earning money somehow.
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Old 03-12-2015, 07:22 PM   #60
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Originally Posted by FlyBoy5 View Post
Funny you mention this. Although retired, I do have things to do and I keep myself quite busy. My Dad, however, thinks that my new j*b is to tend to his every need which is a bit bothersome since he is still quite able to be independent and figure things out on his own.

A phone call will often go like so:

Me "Hello?"
Dad "Are you busy?"
Me "Yeah, a little bit. Is something wrong?"
Dad "Oh I'm sorry. Let me ask you (insert some stupid question here)"

I wish I knew of a polite way to tell him to bugger off, but I feel obliged.

Oh wow are we sharing the same dad? I get the same thing, I'm still working and traveling for work. My dad will call or text and say to give him a call- since my mom is terminally ill I usually call right away and it is usually something like "we planted roses in front of the house and it took all day". Ugh....


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