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Old 01-09-2016, 03:26 PM   #21
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It was hard, honestly there many times I thought about quitting. The pension is tiny. Honestly I don't know how I did it.


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Old 01-12-2016, 09:05 AM   #22
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"How do you train yourself to endure your last few years before retirement"
I feel your pain. I am 2 years and 3 months until FIRE date. I can't wait until April of this year, then I can say it is Only 1 year and # months until FIRE.
So basically, looking at small milestones to celebrate! Hope this helps.
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How do you train yourself to endure your last few years before retirement
Old 01-16-2016, 10:55 PM   #23
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How do you train yourself to endure your last few years before retirement

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Originally Posted by RetireAge50 View Post
What meadbh just said is exactly what I have done for 26 years.

It's what I've done for 32 years since day one. I have less than six months now, so I'm taking it to "invisibility cloak mode".

In all seriousness, you keep focusing on one milestone goal at a time that lay ahead. Next raise, next and last bonus, last time you have to review your staff, last project you start that you will probably actually see to completion, etc Etc.

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How do you train yourself to endure your last few years before retirement
Old 01-16-2016, 11:25 PM   #24
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How do you train yourself to endure your last few years before retirement

I have 5-7 years to go if I stay on my current high-stress track as a manager. The tank is getting empty though and my organization is looking at a very rough couple of years ahead due to some bone-headed financial decisions the CEO and board got us into that the rest of us are paying for. Instead, I am starting to interview for frontline positions at other orgs that would require no management and less travel toward a hope of learning new things and getting back in touch with enthusiasm I once felt for my nonprofit field. These other jobs would pay a third less so might postpone FIRE probably 3 years but the thought of it makes the next several years seem more enjoyable if I can find the right fit. Lately, the income reduction seems worth it rather than grinding years out less happily. Not sure if voluntary demotion is an option for the OP, but it is one strategy toward more happiness.


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Old 01-17-2016, 06:37 AM   #25
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Two possible strategies might work to help stay motivated and calm - First one, focus on the aspects of work that you like, and realize that you won't have to do the bad parts too much longer. If you know you're not fighting for the next promotion, it can help relieve some of the stress. If you can't find anything good about the work itself, try to find something tangible to motivate you. If you're thinking of moving on retirement, take some trips to explore possible locations. Try living on your "retirement budget" - proving that your plans are on track can help make retirement seem more real. if you're interested in pursuing new hobbies, try to get started on them now - anything that helps make FIRE more tangible in your current life.
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Why keep trying to get engaged with a job you hate? It may be easier to think of the job in a utilitarian way, simply as a means to a financial end. Do what you need to do to get the work done and earn the paycheck, but do not let the job take over your life. Say no to "opportunities" for self development, meetings you don't really need to attend, and pointless social events where employees brown nose the boss. Leave when the day is over and don't bring work home. Don't check work email and don't agree to be on call. Fill your personal time with activities that you really want to do. The time will pass more quickly.
I am also in a similar situation as I wait out my last 1 1/2 years of w**k. I think both of the above posts are very good. I see this time as topping off the tank for the RE trip.
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Old 01-17-2016, 02:31 PM   #26
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Deep inside I get a great deal of satisfaction from my job....I am a teacher....I still love being with my students....and I think I am very good at my job. Plus I don't golf so...what would I do with my time...
Where I worked we had a saying: "When it is time, you will know". In that case, very true. You like your job, the people are good to you, no reason to leave yet. But having the option is always a good thing if things go south on you.

Saw this article this morning, a lady age 102 and still teaching. I's say she missed the ER boat.

Sundance School Students Adore 102-Year-Old Teacher Agnes Zhelesnik « CBS New York
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Old 01-21-2016, 02:03 PM   #27
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I have coined the term ADULT DAYCARE. That sums up what it is like to run the gauntlet of busy work useless tasks.
You guys are killing me!

Yep, I felt the same way during the last few years before I ER'ed. I took my job very seriously for most of my career. I worked hard and reasonably smart and was granted the freedom to do my work as a professional. I was fortunate to be able to lead a few great teams in critical roles.

Of course, things gradually changed as I moved through the technical ranks and was starting to get sucked into management against my will. The politics finally engulfed me and I bailed when the micromanagement & BS grew overwhelming. Fortunately, the market was good in 2014 and I hit "my number" that year financially. Now life is great

I started savings aggressively for ER in the early 2000's. What a rough decade! Honestly, I didn't think much about it at the time since ER seemed 20-25 years out. I was too busy working and living my life, I almost forgot about ER since my savings plan was on autopilot. Fast forward to 2014, I woke up realizing I hated my job and would have enough $$ to stop the hating, so I left within a year. One of the longest years of my life. I just focussed on my milestones of ER planning and started to emotionally decouple from w*rk.

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Old 01-23-2016, 07:37 AM   #28
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I'm in the same situation except I have 4 years to go. I'm financial advisor so this week has been particularly bad. When I started this job I never thought I'd act as a therapist, but i have spent the last two weeks explaining, reassuring, patting hands, and sometimes begging people not to sell out of the market when its down. Its exhausting. Usually its not so bad. My outlet is dreaming of retirement and designing/researching vacations I will take when I am done. I have never been on vacation long enough to be ready to come home- I wonder what that's like
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Old 01-23-2016, 08:19 AM   #29
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When I started this job I never thought I'd act as a therapist, but i have spent the last two weeks explaining, reassuring, patting hands, and sometimes begging people not to sell out of the market when its down. Its exhausting.
For your sake then, I hope this doesn't turn into an extended, deeper downturn. Imagine how much counselling you would have had to have done during the 2007-2009 decline!
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Old 01-23-2016, 08:28 AM   #30
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I don't have to imagine it. I have been a broker for 19 years. I have been through every kind of market except a bad bond market which I suspect is coming. The upside is that people are extremely grateful for talking them out of bailing in 09.
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Old 01-23-2016, 08:33 AM   #31
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I am about a year and a half from RE. I had an interesting experience yesterday, when I was meeting with my manager for my annual performance review. Usually it goes fine, but occasionally I get some "areas for improvement" that I am just not motivated to do, but I do not want my rating to fall either, and it makes for some stress. This time, it generally went fine, but when we got to "improvement" I was saying 'sure, sure, I'll do that' but I was thinking 'I don't need to do it this time because now it doesn't matter'. That was a pleasant change.

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I have never been on vacation long enough to be ready to come home- I wonder what that's like
Decades ago DW and I had a two week trip to Britian. We were constantly pushing to see the sights, tour museums and castles, walk trails, and get from place to place that we were exhausted by the time it was over and we were quite ready to come home. We just wanted to do everything that we possibly could while we were there. Nowadays, we try to pace ourselves more, and not get worn out. Our stamina is not what it was anyway.
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Old 01-24-2016, 11:35 AM   #32
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I feel the same about annual performance reviews. I either want to stay right where I am or retire, so why would I want to work on improving anything. Maybe the next review will be the cure for my OMY virus I may have contracted.
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Old 01-24-2016, 06:23 PM   #33
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Decades ago DW and I had a two week trip to Britian. We were constantly pushing to see the sights, tour museums and castles, walk trails, and get from place to place that we were exhausted by the time it was over and we were quite ready to come home. We just wanted to do everything that we possibly could while we were there. Nowadays, we try to pace ourselves more, and not get worn out. Our stamina is not what it was anyway.
yes- exactly. By the time we recover from jetlag its time to go home already
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Old 01-24-2016, 06:44 PM   #34
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I'm in the same situation except I have 4 years to go. I'm financial advisor so this week has been particularly bad. When I started this job I never thought I'd act as a therapist, but i have spent the last two weeks explaining, reassuring, patting hands, and sometimes begging people not to sell out of the market when its down. Its exhausting. Usually its not so bad. My outlet is dreaming of retirement and designing/researching vacations I will take when I am done. I have never been on vacation long enough to be ready to come home- I wonder what that's like

Boy isn't that the truth! Only 11 years as a CFP for me, but long enough to know the therapy side of the business.

But I've been lucky to manage really long breaks for overseas trips quite a lot, and definitely been ready to come home a time or two. And I agree, sometimes the best part of vacations is the planning ahead of time!

Let's hope it looks better soon, for us and the clients!

I'm leaving for 3 weeks to England just before tax season--really tempting fate with that one, but the analyst in our office will be coming off maternity leave then, and I'll surely need the break!
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Old 01-24-2016, 07:19 PM   #35
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THREE weeks in England- ugh I'm so envious! I do hope it gets better soon- short corrections are easier for keeping clients calm and sticking to their plans than long ones like '08 to '09. And I already dumped my spare cash in... Have a lovely time on your trip!
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Old 01-24-2016, 07:33 PM   #36
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Ah, risk management. I used to be in a bank's risk management department but we were credit risk so we only bothered the customers.

Unfortunately, at least at my old MegaCorp, it was adult daycare. There was a round of layoffs of the tenured people so I found myself trying to train a bunch of new hire developers to replace them.
. . . . . . . .

So, my advice is to stay detached and maintain your sense of humor. I did take on some high risk of failure projects (at least one did) since they were different and I didn't care if they would hurt my career down the road. I also trying to do a lot of retirement planning outside of work hours so that I could see the light at the end of the tunnel.
I too was in risk management for a large captive finance company. When 2008 business downturn hit, top management decided they'd retire all the new hires and all the over 55 year old's. I was 58 1/2 but was paid until age 62. The timing was perfect for me but we employees had long since lost our sense of humor.

Now they're trying to run a $13 billion sales company without experienced people. So far, the pension payments are being made and that's all that matters to me.
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Old 01-24-2016, 10:15 PM   #37
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Due to gov't regulations after the financial meltdown, the entire bank is filled with useless overhead disguised as risk management.
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I work in IT with Megacorp. I work with many segments of the organization that deal with Sarbanes-Oxley mandate: external auditors, internal auditors, Information Security. The amount of overhead and waste is mind-boggling. One system alone reached more than 20 million, and there are countless systems like that in Megacorp, all in the name of Sarbanes-Oxley.

I am 60. My job is not too strenuous and I work from home so it makes it more tolerable. I am waiting for the involuntary separation but it may not happen soon.
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Old 01-25-2016, 04:15 AM   #38
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It can be really tough. I had to work about 3 more years after I had negotiated my retirement. It went very slowly. They treated me well though and paid big comp in accordance with our agreement.

Only advice I would give is don't count the days as it will only make it seem longer. Try to stay engaged (difficult for sure) maybe mentor some newer guys, become the older voice of reason who isn't afraid to call a spade..... ? Every workplace is different and each employee has a different position in that workplace. Be an adult and try not to do anything you might regret as you will have plenty of time to think about it once retired. Always take the "high road". Good luck.
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Old 01-25-2016, 07:09 AM   #39
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Only advice I would give is don't count the days as it will only make it seem longer. Try to stay engaged (difficult for sure) maybe mentor some newer guys, become the older voice of reason who isn't afraid to call a spade..... ? Every workplace is different and each employee has a different position in that workplace. Be an adult and try not to do anything you might regret as you will have plenty of time to think about it once retired. Always take the "high road". Good luck.
So I guess I should delete the retirement countdown timer on my phone, huh?
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Old 01-25-2016, 07:31 AM   #40
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So I guess I should delete the retirement countdown timer on my phone, huh?
Ever just sit and watch water boil?
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