Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Lots to learn
Old 04-29-2017, 08:58 AM   #1
Dryer sheet wannabe
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 14
Lots to learn

Hello folks, my name's Jay. I am thrilled to have found this forum. Last year I seriously started considering that FIRE was a possibility with proper planning and dedication. Before that it seemed a distance dream. I only hope I'm not starting too late! I think I have a decent foundation to start from at this point, but I'll let you all assess that.

I'll be 40 this year and have a family of 3. We are very good at living below our means and prefer a simplistic, utilitarian and self-sufficient lifestyle. Our 20 acre farm is paid off and provides most of our food and could provide for all our physical needs if necessary. I spent my early years working on establishing the farm while I had infinite amounts of energy but in the interest of stability I now need to focus on the financial end of things.

We are currently debt free but our financial assets aren't great though. We have about 50K spread between CD's, savings and an ESA for our daughter. I could probably put 40-80K a year into investments.

What I need to learn about is investing. My knowledge is very basic (infantile one might say!) and I would appreciate any recommendations for reading material, websites, books, or threads on here that already have that info (have looked bit haven't seen any). It seems there is so much advice out there to be had that I want to make sure I am starting out on the right foot.

I look forward to contributing where I can but at this point unless you need advice on sustainable land management, small scale farming or self-sufficiency I doubt I have much to offer.

Glad to be here and thank you.
__________________

hollowelm is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 04-29-2017, 09:06 AM   #2
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
2017ish's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 1,851
Welcome! Sounds like you have a very good foundation built.

For investing, I've recommended "If You Can" as a nice introduction; although it is expressly aimed at "kids" in their 20s, it is a good intro, especially if you read the handful of books that he recommends. It is a free downloadable pdf at this link If You Can and Rational Expectations

The Bogleheads site, which many posters here also frequent, has good introduction to investing in its wiki, starting here https://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/Getting_started and here https://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/Bogl...g_start-up_kit
__________________

__________________
OMY * 3 2ish Done 7.28.17
2017ish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2017, 04:10 PM   #3
Recycles dryer sheets
evilanne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: San Antonio
Posts: 174
I couldn't get the pdf from the above link but found it here: https://www.etf.com/docs/IfYouCan.pdf
evilanne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2017, 05:27 AM   #4
Administrator
MichaelB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 29,084
Quote:
Originally Posted by evilanne View Post
I couldn't get the pdf from the above link but found it here: https://www.etf.com/docs/IfYouCan.pdf
This is a book by William Bernstein. He has a numbe of books that are of interest, some are free, and you can find PDF and ebook versions at his website If You Can and Rational Expectations
MichaelB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2017, 02:12 PM   #5
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: New York City
Posts: 2,838
were you paying off your farm all these years? if you can put 40-80k a year in investments now where did it go in the past? just curious. You have a ton to offer , if i was your neighbor id be asking you farming questions for years, i cant even grow a tomato plant let alone be self sufficient . keep the financial plan simple find a asset allocation u and the bride like, dollar cost average this 40-80 thousand a year into it, stick to low cost mutual funds, put it on auto pilot, you will be fine. as a side note a WRITTEN budget that u formulate with ur bride will help keep expenses in control and u will see where ur money goes. i no longer do a written budget i have a sort of budget in my head, im no longer trying to save up a nest egg Good luck sir
__________________
Withdrawal Rate currently zero, Pension 137 % of our spending, Wasted 5 years of my prime working extra for a safe withdrawal rate. I can live like a King for a year, or a Prince for the rest of my life. I will stay on topic, I will stay on topic, I will stay on topic
Blue Collar Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2017, 02:29 PM   #6
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Nodak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Cavalier
Posts: 2,317
Welcome
__________________
"Don't take life so serious, son. It ain't nohow permanent." Pogo Possum (Walt Kelly)
Nodak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2017, 04:26 PM   #7
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
brewer12345's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 16,748
If you want the short course on investing, it is pretty simple: pick a low cost balanced fund (Vanguard has several to choose from), put money in regularly, ignore any and all market fluctuations. That is about all you really need to know, but of course you can read up as much as you would like.
__________________
"There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest have to pee on the electric fence for themselves."



- Will Rogers
brewer12345 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2017, 04:36 PM   #8
Full time employment: Posting here.
UnrealizedPotential's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 881
Welcome to the forum. This is a great place to learn about money and investing.
__________________
Understanding both the power of compound interest and the difficulty of getting it is the heart and soul of understanding a lot of things. Charlie Munger
UnrealizedPotential is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2017, 04:42 PM   #9
Dryer sheet wannabe
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Stevensville
Posts: 24
I would also go over to Jim Collin's web sight and read the stock series

Stock Series
Badbreath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2017, 04:58 PM   #10
Dryer sheet wannabe
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2017ish View Post
Welcome! Sounds like you have a very good foundation built.

For investing, I've recommended "If You Can" as a nice introduction; although it is expressly aimed at "kids" in their 20s, it is a good intro, especially if you read the handful of books that he recommends. It is a free downloadable pdf at this link If You Can and Rational Expectations

The Bogleheads site, which many posters here also frequent, has good introduction to investing in its wiki, starting here https://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/Getting_started and here https://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/Bogl...g_start-up_kit
Thanks for the links!
Quote:
Originally Posted by evilanne View Post
I couldn't get the pdf from the above link but found it here: https://www.etf.com/docs/IfYouCan.pdf
hollowelm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2017, 05:13 PM   #11
Dryer sheet wannabe
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Collar Guy View Post
were you paying off your farm all these years? if you can put 40-80k a year in investments now where did it go in the past? just curious. You have a ton to offer , if i was your neighbor id be asking you farming questions for years, i cant even grow a tomato plant let alone be self sufficient . keep the financial plan simple find a asset allocation u and the bride like, dollar cost average this 40-80 thousand a year into it, stick to low cost mutual funds, put it on auto pilot, you will be fine. as a side note a WRITTEN budget that u formulate with ur bride will help keep expenses in control and u will see where ur money goes. i no longer do a written budget i have a sort of budget in my head, im no longer trying to save up a nest egg Good luck sir
Consider me your neighbor BCG and ask away!

The simple answer is, yes. I was focused on building "sweat equity" in the farm when I was younger so I didn't work as much and had a lower income. That and I wanted to be around and more available when my daughter was young. To me land I could support my family on was the best initial and most real investment I could make. I have since grown my contracting business and now need to put away $$ for the future.
hollowelm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2017, 05:18 PM   #12
Dryer sheet wannabe
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by brewer12345 View Post
If you want the short course on investing, it is pretty simple: pick a low cost balanced fund (Vanguard has several to choose from), put money in regularly, ignore any and all market fluctuations. That is about all you really need to know, but of course you can read up as much as you would like.
Good to know because that is essentially my initial plan while I learned more.
Should I wait till a market drop to get started?
hollowelm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2017, 05:48 PM   #13
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
brewer12345's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 16,748
Quote:
Originally Posted by hollowelm View Post
Good to know because that is essentially my initial plan while I learned more.
Should I wait till a market drop to get started?
Nope, just put money in every month. Remember, ignore all market fluctuations.
__________________
"There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest have to pee on the electric fence for themselves."



- Will Rogers
brewer12345 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2017, 05:56 PM   #14
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
OldShooter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: City
Posts: 2,954
Here is what the Nobel Prize winning investment gurus say about investing, summarized in four short videos:

https://youtu.be/TbMjIn1p-i0

https://youtu.be/wqMZm7vP0DU

https://famafrench.dimensional.com/v...investing.aspx

https://famafrench.dimensional.com/v...-managers.aspx

Longer but worthwhile: INVESTORS FROM THE MOON: FAMA | Top1000Funds.com

+1 on the If You Can download. A little longer read: Winning the Loser's Game by Charles Ellis.

I can take the bogleheads site in very small doses. The tutorial material (https://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/Getting_started) can be helpful. The forums tend towards repetition and get a little intense for my taste. YMMV however.

The videos above were taken from here:
Harry Markowitz Interviews
and here:
https://famafrench.dimensional.com/videos.aspx
Both pages offer many more worthwhile videos.
OldShooter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2017, 06:22 PM   #15
Moderator
Walt34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern WV Panhandle
Posts: 19,486
To start out if nothing else pick a target date fund at Vanguard, Fidelity, or other low-cost place. DO NOT go anywhere near any place like Edward Jones or Ameriprise. Their main interest is to transfer as much money as they can from your wallet to theirs.

A number of books I have read include these:

The Millionaire Teacher by Andrew Hallam
How a Second Grader Beats Wall Street by Allan S. Roth

These first two are the ones I absolutely recommend for beginners.

I also have read these:

Predictably Irrational by Dan Ariely – I found this very interesting!

The Four Pillars of Investing by William J. Bernstein

Why Smart People Make Big Money Mistakes by Gary Belsky & Thomas Gilovich

Your Money & Your Brain by Jason Zweig

The Investor’s Manifesto Preparing for Prosperity, Armageddon, and Everything in Between by William J. Bernstein

A Random Walk Down Wall Street by Burton G. Malkiel

And if you really want to get deep into behavior issues with money– Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman, the only psychologist to win a Nobel Prize in Economics. It’s probably more than you want to get into but I found it fascinating. It’s also a rather thick book.
__________________
I heard the call to do nothing. So I answered it.
Walt34 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2017, 06:23 PM   #16
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: New York City
Posts: 2,838
Quote:
Originally Posted by hollowelm View Post
Good to know because that is essentially my initial plan while I learned more.
Should I wait till a market drop to get started?
thank you, i look forward to our conversations.
__________________
Withdrawal Rate currently zero, Pension 137 % of our spending, Wasted 5 years of my prime working extra for a safe withdrawal rate. I can live like a King for a year, or a Prince for the rest of my life. I will stay on topic, I will stay on topic, I will stay on topic
Blue Collar Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2017, 06:27 PM   #17
Recycles dryer sheets
Lawrencewendall's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Severn
Posts: 419
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt34 View Post
To start out if nothing else pick a target date fund at Vanguard, Fidelity, or other low-cost place. [/FONT]
I put some money in a target date (2025) with Fidelity just to see how they fared versus my own picks. It is up 75% since 2009! I have some higher but a lot lower. Target dates are not always bad but there is stuff out there equal if not better. YMMV
Lawrencewendall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2017, 07:56 PM   #18
Dryer sheet wannabe
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Stevensville
Posts: 24
Fidelity target index fund is what you should be looking at not just the Fidelity target fund.
Badbreath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2017, 08:22 PM   #19
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Mdlerth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: The Shire
Posts: 1,108
Quote:
Originally Posted by hollowelm View Post

I'll be 40 this year... We are very good at living below our means and prefer a simplistic, utilitarian and self-sufficient lifestyle...
You will encounter some kindred spirits in this Brit-com about a 40-year-old couple who dive into a self-sufficient lifestyle. It holds up well considering it, too, is 40 years old!

http://https://www.amazon.com/Good-N.../dp/B000784WKO

Welcome to the forum.
__________________
Paying it forward is the best investment.
Mdlerth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2017, 08:30 PM   #20
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
38Chevy454's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 2,158
Welcome to the forum. I agree that invest regular and consistent, in some low-cost widely held mutual fund type accounts. Just keep doing that, ignoring what the market does. Start now. The best thing you will find out is the magic of compounding. The earlier you start the better compounding works. Repeat: start the regular consistent savings now.

I presume you are considered a self-employed farmer. You can still do a pre-tax IRA for some taxable income savings. If your tax rate is lower consider Roth IRA, it is after tax money but grows tax free.Also good to have some regular after-tax investment account savings, to cover unexpected expenses or to provide some income money in early retirement that will be able to withdraw without significant taxes due.

Continue the LBYM lifestyle, and the savings, and you will make your early retirement goal.
__________________

__________________
The advice we're giving you is invaluable, that's why it's free
Experience is a good teacher, but the tuition can get expensive real fast

Semi-Retired 7/1/16: working part-time (60%) for now [4/24/17 changed to 80%]
Retired Aug 2, 2017; age 53
38Chevy454 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hello. . . new here and lots to learn Rainy Hi, I am... 5 07-28-2011 05:26 PM
ER Flags (Lots of Graphics) BigMoneyJim Other topics 16 10-29-2009 09:51 AM
ERed, but lots to learn - Too Frugal for my Cat toofrugalformycat Hi, I am... 17 08-08-2007 06:00 PM
Wow, Lots of Posts yakers Other topics 24 01-03-2006 11:54 AM
Imagine: Can lots of people ERing make things better for everybody? ESRBob Life after FIRE 50 07-02-2005 06:47 PM

» Quick Links

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:50 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.