Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
New here, referred from Bogleheads
Old 07-29-2010, 07:20 AM   #1
Confused about dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Bay City , MI
Posts: 3
New here, referred from Bogleheads

Hello,
I was referred to this site from the Boglehead site. This was after setting a retirement date, then rescinding it after concerns of how the devil I will spend the , perhaps, 30 more years of my life. I'm a self-employed famiy physican.
I have hobbies/interests, but they take up 2 or 3 hours max a day, and that lives too many hours unaccounted for. I'm single, my kids live out of state.
Any like MD's here , with similar questions or hopefully answers ?....best , Doug
__________________

__________________
amcan57 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 07-29-2010, 07:29 AM   #2
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso) Give me a forum ...
REWahoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Texas Hill Country
Posts: 42,151
Paging Rich_in_Tampa, Meadbh, DblDoc...
__________________

__________________
Numbers is hard

When I hit 70, it hit back

Retired in 2005 at age 58, no pension
REWahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2010, 07:32 AM   #3
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso) Give me a forum ...
REWahoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Texas Hill Country
Posts: 42,151
Amcan57, while you are waiting you might want to check out some of the threads you'll find here: (FAQ archive) But... what will I do all day?
__________________
Numbers is hard

When I hit 70, it hit back

Retired in 2005 at age 58, no pension
REWahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2010, 08:08 AM   #4
Moderator Emeritus
Rich_by_the_Bay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 8,827
Welcome to the board, Doug. I am a recently (April) retired academic internist, chose the semi-retirement route for a while, but find myself increasingly motivated to decrease the "semi-" part. I am pretty sure I caused some mental illness here on the board postponing my decision for a while (retired at age 61) but in the end feel very glad I got through the 08 economic storm before finally pulling the plug.

It was not easy for me to get over the decades of defining yourself solely as a doctor, it is really liberating and uplifting to restore balance to your life.

You might enjoy perusing some of the archived threads. Look forward to learning more about your situation.
__________________
Rich
San Francisco Area
ESR'd March 2010. FIRE'd January 2011.

As if you didn't know..If the above message contains medical content, it's NOT intended as advice, and may not be accurate, applicable or sufficient. Don't rely on it for any purpose. Consult your own doctor for all medical advice.
Rich_by_the_Bay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2010, 08:57 AM   #5
Confused about dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Bay City , MI
Posts: 3
Thanks for your reply, Rich. I am 59, a couple months shy of 60. With the months winding down to my planned date to end my lease and sign off, I had serious second thoughts. I told the president of our partnership that I am staying in it for a while longer. A lot of it was giving up a large degree of my self-worth and identity. I am financially set ( reached my 'number' in January this year, it then took a dip, but has bounced back). So I think I'll take more time off, having never taken more than 3 weeks off a year in the 33 years that I have been doing this. I most worried about how to keep busy. I can only read so much and coffee with old retirees does not sound appealing. So I will read more here and keep in the job force for at least 3 or so more years...Doug
__________________
amcan57 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2010, 09:06 AM   #6
Moderator Emeritus
Rich_by_the_Bay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 8,827
Quote:
Originally Posted by amcan57 View Post
Thanks for your reply, Rich. So I think I'll take more time off, having never taken more than 3 weeks off a year in the 33 years that I have been doing this. I most worried about how to keep busy. I can only read so much and coffee with old retirees does not sound appealing. So I will read more here and keep in the job force for at least 3 or so more years...Doug
I hear ya.

You might find some of the archived threads interesting, like the numerous "what do you do all day" ones. You also might find that you no longer have a need to fill everyday with planned activities, that you acquire a taste for leisure. You'll work it out.
__________________
Rich
San Francisco Area
ESR'd March 2010. FIRE'd January 2011.

As if you didn't know..If the above message contains medical content, it's NOT intended as advice, and may not be accurate, applicable or sufficient. Don't rely on it for any purpose. Consult your own doctor for all medical advice.
Rich_by_the_Bay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2010, 09:17 AM   #7
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
BUM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Mid Hudson Valley
Posts: 1,778
I Doug,

I'm not a MD but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night and I've been FIRE'd since 2005. Like you I Bogelheaded and studied all I could find, including this great forum before I retired, and I worried a lot about spending money and time. In retrospect it all was mostly nervous energy and micromanagement.

Take the plunge. The water's fine.
__________________
In a panamax down by the river.
BUM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2010, 03:17 PM   #8
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Moemg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Sarasota,fl.
Posts: 10,039
Welcome ,
I am a retired RN and I had the same concerns . What will I do all day ? I am not the play cards with the gals type . I am more of a doer . I joined a gym . I started an ebay business and I am currently remodeling my house . Between all this and visiting my daughter who lives several states away my life is filled . It seems like most medical people have the hardest time retiring . Like Rich I did it in phases until I was truly ready at 59 . Good Luck ! It really is enjoyable and as fulfilling as you make it .
__________________
Moemg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2010, 09:57 PM   #9
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Helen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Portland
Posts: 1,356
Hi Doug,

I'm not a doctor but I am from Midland, MI. Welcome to the forum!

-helen
__________________
Helen is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2010, 01:06 AM   #10
Moderator Emeritus
Nords's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Oahu
Posts: 26,620
Welcome tothe board, Doug.

Typical ER comment:
"Before I ER'd I was worried about what I would do all day. Now I wonder why I was worried about it."

Rich had the board's worst case of "just one more year" syndrome. If he could heal himself then you can too.

It's easier than it looks. If you're enjoying the heck out of working then that's what you should do. But if you're working because you can't imagine how else to pass your time, then you need a new imagination.
__________________
*
*

The book written on E-R.org, "The Military Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement", on sale now! For more info see "About Me" in my profile.
I don't spend much time here anymore, so please send me a PM. Thanks.
Nords is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2010, 11:40 AM   #11
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
DblDoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 1,224
Welcome Doug.

I'm about 10 years behind you and Rich. Any possibility of a sabbatical from your job to test the waters? You might also do a search for "bucket list" and get inspired about things you might want to accomplish in life but haven't had the time to dedicate to it yet. We tend to be type A's and want to complete "tasks". If you had a list of 100 things to do in life before your done (like learn a new language) you might find your days filling in quickly. Good luck in whatever you decide.

DD
__________________
At 54% of FIRE target
DblDoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2010, 01:53 AM   #12
Recycles dryer sheets
check6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 383
When I saw my dermatologist last year I used to kid him that I retired before him and was 5 years younger than him. Not to be morbid, he had a heart attack the next month and past away. Something to think about and why I retired early.
__________________
check6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2010, 08:24 AM   #13
Full time employment: Posting here.
Cattusbabe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 814
Welcome to the board. Another retired RN here. Took the leap five years ago at age fifty. Never looked back. Would have done this at age forty if I have the bucks.

After a period of "decompression" I have filled my days with all the stuff I have always wanted to do but never had the time. I volunteer with the Red Cross, I work out with my sister three days per week and walk five mile the alternate three days. Sunday I rest. Hubby (also retired) and I have decluttered and reorganized the house and are remodeling some rooms since we plan to stay here for life. (NB. You guys were right. The bathroom remodel took longer than the promised three weeks.) We also travel. We have more time to spend with family and more time to engage in our hobbies, dining and entertainment interests. I guess you build a retirement like you build a career and a life.
__________________
A todos los amantes del mundo. No importa el color de su piel, la pasion es universal.
_______________

La tavola e il letto non hanno restrizioni.
_____________
Any day your on this side of the grass is a good day.
Cattusbabe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2010, 03:50 PM   #14
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 11,020
Welcome Doug!

I'm a single neonatologist in Canada with several years to go. I know the "one more year" feeling. It seems we docs have a great deal of our personal self worth tied up in our careers. In between working and planning my exit strategy I'm gradually learning to smell the roses and to say that very important word: NO. I've learnt that it is really, really important to take my vacations and to develop interests and friends around them. And to turn off the beeper when not on call!

I look forward to your input. Enjoy the forum!

meadbh
__________________
Meadbh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2010, 06:01 AM   #15
Dryer sheet aficionado
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 25
Amcan57 - Sorry in advance to take this thread on a tangent, but...
I have a question for the medical folks here. My daughter will be a senior in high school next year. She is an excellent student and highly motivated. She loves biology, got a 5 in the AP class last year, and has planned for a couple years to be a doctor. Last year she participated in a shadowing program at a local hospital. She received a lot of advice from both doctors and nurses that she would be better off becoming a nurse practitioner or a anethesia nurse than a doctor. Better hours, almost as good pay, more patient interaction. I've already set aside money for her education - through medical school - so education cost is not a factor. As an old-fashioned non-medical person, I've been very excited by the idea of her becoming a doctor. But I don't want to push her to become a doc just to satisfy my ego, expecially because I don't really know this area. I'd appreciated any input from those in the know.

Thanks.
__________________
Xman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2010, 06:32 AM   #16
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 5,072
Welcome
__________________
chinaco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2010, 02:49 PM   #17
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 11,020
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xman View Post
Amcan57 - Sorry in advance to take this thread on a tangent, but...
I have a question for the medical folks here. My daughter will be a senior in high school next year. She is an excellent student and highly motivated. She loves biology, got a 5 in the AP class last year, and has planned for a couple years to be a doctor. Last year she participated in a shadowing program at a local hospital. She received a lot of advice from both doctors and nurses that she would be better off becoming a nurse practitioner or a anethesia nurse than a doctor. Better hours, almost as good pay, more patient interaction. I've already set aside money for her education - through medical school - so education cost is not a factor. As an old-fashioned non-medical person, I've been very excited by the idea of her becoming a doctor. But I don't want to push her to become a doc just to satisfy my ego, expecially because I don't really know this area. I'd appreciated any input from those in the know.

Thanks.
You are a good parent indeed to have saved for DD's tuition, thereby enabling her to start her career without a millstone round her neck!

I'm glad DD is shadowing people. Back in the day when I was her age (old curmudgeon here) these opportunities didn't exist. Both medicine and nursing are great career paths, each with many possibilities and variations. You can have more patient interaction in both careers if you stick to clinical work, and less if you become a researcher or administrator. Both require a lot of night and shift work, particularly early in one's career.

Personality and values are quite important in deciding between the two. Generally speaking, people who make good clinical nurses tend to be EF (extrovert, feeling) on the Myers Briggs personality test, and tend to focus on qualitative aspects and the process of care. Physicians tend to be all over the map, but in my experience tend to be a bit more quantitative (I myself am INTJ on the Myers Briggs). I haven't seen much data on the personality traits of nurse practitioners, but I would think they tend to be somewhere in between. Getting to be a nurse practitioner takes time, experience and a master's degree (in general) but nurses start earning earlier than physicians do, and usually become employees with pensions. Many physicians are paid as individual contractors and in effect are small business owners.

This decision is a huge one and DD needs to be as informed as possible. In the final analysis, it will come down to her preferences. If she would like individual input, send me a PM with DD's contact details.
__________________
Meadbh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2010, 03:41 AM   #18
Dryer sheet aficionado
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 25
Meadbh - Thank you for your thoughful reply. My daughter took a test last year, through the school, to match up her aptitudes and personality with different career choices. Two careers (that I remember) that people like her enjoy were nursing and teaching. Funny because she is rather introverted. The distinction between clinical and research/admin makes sense, also the employee vs. independent operator. Thanks for the perspectives.
__________________
Xman is offline   Reply With Quote
Defining Yourself
Old 08-06-2010, 08:43 AM   #19
Recycles dryer sheets
HsiaoChu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 389
Defining Yourself

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich_in_Tampa View Post
It was not easy for me to get over the decades of defining yourself solely as a doctor, it is really liberating and uplifting to restore balance to your life.
This is one of the major MENTAL hassles of retiring after a long time working IN A REAL CAREER. IMO, those people who work at different jobs, whose job is just a job and not a full blown career, or who retire after less than 30 years-AND/OR don't really define themselves by what they do, don't really understand. This may be limited to what used to be called the "Professions": doctors, educators, college professors, high up upper management Executives for one corporation for a long time, etc. These people have a pretty much defined their lives around the goals and stuff of a career doing one specific kind of thing better than anyone else that they know within the parameters that they've been given.

And even though you may know its time to go(I'm retiring in 10.5 months, after 40 years as a professional counselor in school based mental health services), and you have plenty to do and hobbies to try, and things to volunteer, you know that you will no longer be able to define yourself as anything other than a former "something". Any association you are a part of makes you a "retired member". You no longer have any say in your profession that you labored so hard at for so many years and which you developed a point of leadership over your mostly younger peers. Your biggest problem is that while working, you had utility, and people needed you and depended on you. Now you have to adjust to a place where substantially less people need you, and almost nobody depends on you. This can be liberating, but for many with whom their lives were not just defined by money and stuff, this can be very very very hard. I can see this looming.

Only those who actually defined their lives based on what they did for a living can understand this LOSS.

I suspect the only way is to look for leadership posts in your volunteer work in your retirement from your life defining job.

HsiaoChu
__________________
HsiaoChu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2010, 09:31 AM   #20
Moderator Emeritus
Rich_by_the_Bay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 8,827
Quote:
Originally Posted by HsiaoChu View Post
This is one of the major MENTAL hassles of retiring after a long time working IN A REAL CAREER. IMO, those people who work at different jobs, whose job is just a job and not a full blown career, or who retire after less than 30 years-AND/OR don't really define themselves by what they do, don't really understand.
I suspect the only way is to look for leadership posts in your volunteer work in your retirement from your life defining job.
I understand your drift but careful how you define a "REAL CAREER." Lots of folks work hard and diligently in all types of jobs, are smarter than most of us, earn an honest wage and all that -- I don't think they would look at their work lives as anything less than a "REAL CAREER."

In fact, for me the first step was to get over my self-perceived "specialness." While everyone's experience in this transition is unique, a professional and rewarding career is neither rare nor particularly valuable in preparing for the FIRE world. I had to realize that mine was not a "special case" -- it was just my circumstance. Those from other walks of life face comparable issues, losses. The heftiness of your paycheck and our workplace stature erode in the blink of an eye.

Once I made that leap, it was all good -- at least so far (5 months). In my case, part-time work has made this transition easier and more solid. Now I am finding that such work is too often inconveniencing me from my more important FIRE duties, like travel, reading, visiting grandkids, hobbies, doing nothing, and renewing friendships -- in fact I am in the process of cutting back.

I think you will find that we (so-called "professionals") are not always as special as we might think. And most of what I've learned on this forum over the years is from members who are a lot wiser than I, coming a broad range of careers most of which are not the traditional professions.
__________________

__________________
Rich
San Francisco Area
ESR'd March 2010. FIRE'd January 2011.

As if you didn't know..If the above message contains medical content, it's NOT intended as advice, and may not be accurate, applicable or sufficient. Don't rely on it for any purpose. Consult your own doctor for all medical advice.
Rich_by_the_Bay is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bogleheads Guide to Retirement walkinwood FIRE and Money 6 09-28-2009 03:51 PM
The Bogleheads are writing another book! unclemick Other topics 4 08-24-2008 11:21 AM
Bogleheads: Closet FIRE'es? DblDoc FIRE and Money 17 08-10-2008 09:20 AM
Twin City Bogleheads? Marquette Young Dreamers 8 07-17-2008 10:52 AM
Four Pillars and Bogleheads' Guide Jeb-NY FIRE and Money 3 01-04-2006 03:34 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:02 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.