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Old 12-06-2013, 12:29 PM   #21
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You are going to live on $70K in a $450K home
While my expenses are higher than $70K, my two home values also add up to quite a bit more than $450K. It's the advantage of living in AZ with a low RE tax rate. I was alarmed when I saw the RE taxes on the coastal states.
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Old 12-08-2013, 06:19 PM   #22
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Fortunately our real estate taxes are low here in rural Oregon at $2300/yr; 100 year old farmhouse is actually valued at around 150k. It is the 5 acres of Willamette Valley real estate that it sits on that contributes to the overall valuation.

DH and I live fairly simply, with a vegetable garden and heating with wood (the bungalow-style house has been updated with a heat pump, but we prefer the warmth and exercise of the wood stove).

The estimated 70k spendable retirement figure is
I believe reasonable given our particular situation, tho recent unexpected pet costs may threaten to derail this.
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Old 12-09-2013, 01:13 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by copperdogs View Post
The estimated 70k spendable retirement figure is
I believe reasonable given our particular situation, tho recent unexpected pet costs may threaten to derail this.

I have $2500 /year budgeted for pet costs but I think I've budgeted too low. My last dog definitely didn't cost $2500 / year. This one is definitely costing that much (and I have the receipts to prove it)
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Old 12-09-2013, 03:40 PM   #24
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I have $2500 /year budgeted for pet costs but I think I've budgeted too low. My last dog definitely didn't cost $2500 / year. This one is definitely costing that much (and I have the receipts to prove it)
My experience is that this is highly variable. We have high pet costs (we have cats and large dogs). Basically I look at these costs in budgeting for pets:

1) normal food and supplies (like litter) - This can change if a pet develops a special condition. For example, I have a cat with allergies and food he needs is more expensive and since we have multiple cats all eat the new food (it wasn't that more expensive)

2) normal immunizations and vet visits - In some cases you can give shots yourself, but most probably go to the vet

3) Everyday illnesses - These come up occasionally and are part of the regular vet bill. We might have none of these in a year or one or two. In any event they aren't that expensive

4) Major illnesses, injuries - These may never come up or can years between them. They can be short and acute or chronic. This is what is hard to budget. Last year we didn't have any. This year, one cat developed allergies and next year will likely require allergy shots. So that is more chronic. I try to budget something for this kind of thing each year and if unused then it can be used the next year.

5) Boarding or pet care if you travel - Doesn't apply to those who don't have to pay for this. For us, this is a major expense (I debated whether to call it travel or pet and came down on including it with pet care)

6) Everything else - new pet toys, new crates, new pet bowls, etc. This is usually not a lot but again something should be budgeted.
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