Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Retiring at 61 but unsure
Old 03-04-2013, 08:53 PM   #1
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Chicago suburbs
Posts: 109
Retiring at 61 but unsure

Retiring at the end of this month at 61. But still am nervous! Not only for financial security reasons, but feel I should still be working to be socially responsible and contributing. Is that weird, or is it the puritan guilt work ethic?
__________________

__________________
Richard8655 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 03-04-2013, 08:54 PM   #2
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso) Give me a forum ...
REWahoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Texas Hill Country
Posts: 42,093
That's just wrong. Seek professional help if it lasts longer than four hours...
__________________

__________________
Numbers is hard

When I hit 70, it hit back

Retired in 2005 at age 58, no pension
REWahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2013, 09:44 PM   #3
Recycles dryer sheets
inky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 125
You don't have to be in a paid position to contribute to society. Have you considered volunteering after you retire?
__________________
inky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2013, 10:00 PM   #4
gone traveling
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 329
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard8655 View Post
Is that weird, or is it the puritan guilt work ethic?
Dunno. The Oracle from Omaha is still working and making heaps of money (I think). And he gives a lot of it away.
To each his own , but you owe it to yourself to at least take time out for yourself. Perhaps go part time or as others have suggested do some volunteer work.
__________________
UserRequested is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2013, 10:09 PM   #5
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
redduck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: yonder
Posts: 2,053
Quote:
Originally Posted by REWahoo View Post
That's just wrong. Seek professional help if it lasts longer than four hours...
...or less than 28 seconds.
__________________
redduck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2013, 10:21 PM   #6
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Chicago suburbs
Posts: 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by jags View Post
Dunno. The Oracle from Omaha is still working and making heaps of money (I think). And he gives a lot of it away.
To each his own , but you owe it to yourself to at least take time out for yourself. Perhaps go part time or as others have suggested do some volunteer work.
Thanks. Good thoughts and advice and from immediately preceding comment.
__________________
Richard8655 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2013, 11:08 PM   #7
Dryer sheet aficionado
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard8655 View Post
Retiring at the end of this month at 61. But still am nervous! Not only for financial security reasons, but feel I should still be working to be socially responsible and contributing. Is that weird, or is it the puritan guilt work ethic?
I'm not sure what youi're getting it with "financial security." If your house is paid for, and you have income that allows you to go ahead and not work then that's good. If you don't, perhaps you shouldn't be retiring.

As for "socially responsible," volunteer work is good. That is where you can feel you're continuing to "contribute." But at the same time, you have been socially responsible with your many years' worth of work. And that certainly means you have also contributed.

I think you need to give yourself some time.
__________________
Candy83 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 12:53 AM   #8
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
obgyn65's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: midwestern city
Posts: 4,061
I agree with this answer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by inky View Post
You don't have to be in a paid position to contribute to society. Have you considered volunteering after you retire?
__________________
Very conservative with investments. Not ER'd yet, 48 years old. Please do not take anything I write or imply as legal, financial or medical advice directed to you. Contact your own financial advisor, healthcare provider, or attorney for financial, medical and legal advice.
obgyn65 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 04:13 AM   #9
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Duesseldorf, Germany
Posts: 1,005
The exercise of drawing your "get-a-life-tree" might help you to find fulfillment in retirement. Ernie Zielinski explains about it in
How to Retire Happy, Wild, and Free: Retirement Wisdom That You Won't Get from Your Financial Advisor: Ernie J. Zelinski: 9780969419495: Amazon.com: Books

This picture also illustrates it well:

__________________
chris2008 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 04:45 AM   #10
Dryer sheet wannabe
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: lexington
Posts: 22
Legitimate concerns posted from the note that started this thread and the responses. I imagine many of us had those same concerns. It is a big change. I've been retired only half a year but I am pleasantly surprised by how quickly my thinking about work has changed. The things I used to worry about are gone, the things that bugged me daily are gone...what I used to think was so terribly important is now just a memory. And I love it.

I was a dedicated good employee and I made a difference. I cared and put my life into that job. But now...I'm glad I did all that but there's more to living than that job. And I don't regret retiring one bit.
__________________
coolowl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 07:55 AM   #11
Moderator
Walt34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern WV Panhandle
Posts: 16,528
I figure that if I'm self-supporting and not being a burden on others I am being socially responsible. Anything beyond that is just extra.

Not to say that going beyond the minimum isn't a great thing to do but in police work I saw so many people who seemingly went out of their way to be a pain to others. The world would be a better place if those people just stayed home and watched TV. At least then they'd have been out of the way of those who do want to make things better.
__________________
I heard the call to do nothing. So I answered it.
Walt34 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 08:42 AM   #12
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Nodak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Cavalier
Posts: 2,317
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt34 View Post
I figure that if I'm self-supporting and not being a burden on others I am being socially responsible. Anything beyond that is just extra.

Not to say that going beyond the minimum isn't a great thing to do but in police work I saw so many people who seemingly went out of their way to be a pain to others. The world would be a better place if those people just stayed home and watched TV. At least then they'd have been out of the way of those who do want to make things better.
+1
__________________
"Don't take life so serious, son. It ain't nohow permanent." Pogo Possum (Walt Kelly)
Nodak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 11:24 AM   #13
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 430
I had the same thing happen to me and it took a while for it to disappear. I am four years older than you but it does happen to some of us. I think the way we were brought up causes this. Guilt I am now over it and enjoy each and every day.
I could care less what others think of me. I do remember one time about 20 years ago my next door neighbor was watching me hit golf balls in my back yard. She came over and said, why are you not working? I told her I was having bad mental issues and needed to stop working because I thought I would harm someone including some of my neighbors She left me alone after that but still peaked out the back window if I was in my back yard during the work week.lol
Get over what others feel and enjoy your retirement. Once anyone reaches 60 most have worked enough.
__________________
oldtrig is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 11:37 AM   #14
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Midpack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 11,971
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard8655 View Post
Retiring at the end of this month at 61. But still am nervous! Not only for financial security reasons, but feel I should still be working to be socially responsible and contributing. Is that weird, or is it the puritan guilt work ethic?
Nervous/uncertain never goes away entirely when one commits to retiring, it just reaches a tolerable level, unique to each of us. I'd say your abnormal if you have no nerves about it whatsover.

And work is socially responsible, contributing, necessary even noble , but as others have said, retirement doesn't have to be otherwise. You can contribute in many other ways, volunteering or even if just to make your families life better. As long as you don't
  • drink all day
  • sit in front of the boob tube all day,
  • or surf internet forums all day repeating yourself ad infinitim,
you can still contribute in meaningful ways.

Gotta log off now...
__________________
No one agrees with other people's opinions; they merely agree with their own opinions -- expressed by somebody else. Sydney Tremayne
Retired Jun 2011 at age 57

Target AA: 60% equity funds / 35% bond funds / 5% cash
Target WR: Approx 2.5% Approx 20% SI (secure income, SS only)
Midpack is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 12:09 PM   #15
Moderator
MBAustin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 4,152
I took the plunge at a much younger age and have struggled with this on and off. I'll second the motion to read Ernie Zelinski's books (my favorite is The Joy of Not Working) which have some good historical and global perspectives as well as helpful exercises as mentioned above. My solution (?) unfortunately was to overcommit to volunteer activities, as well as take on some limited consulting. I'm now finding myself too busy and looking forward to having some of my commitments wind down, as well as not feeling guilty about missing a meeting here and there to travel.

Good luck!
__________________
"One of the funny things about the stock market is that every time one person buys, another sells, and both think they are astute." William Feather
----------------------------------
ER'd Oct. 2010 at 53. Life is good.
MBAustin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 12:37 PM   #16
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 1,103
I sort of eased into it at 61, fully unemployed as of about 9 months ago. I experienced a lot of what you describe, but with time it really does go away. Volunteering can scratch the itch of self value. I left my longer term full time employment almost two years ago and I have not once wished I had not. With time, the idea of returning to what I used to do is just plain unacceptable.

I've read where making the adjustment to retirement can take a few years for some. I feel I'm way ahead of that curve, some just make it instantly. Give it time, but spend some time searching for things that give you what you may need, be it volunteering or hobbies. Good luck!
__________________
H2ODude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 12:41 PM   #17
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
braumeister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Northern Kentucky
Posts: 8,597
Remind yourself that it was out of your control. A lot of us retired for medical reasons (allergic to work).
__________________
braumeister is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 03:48 PM   #18
gone traveling
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard8655 View Post
Retiring at the end of this month at 61. But still am nervous! Not only for financial security reasons, but feel I should still be working to be socially responsible and contributing. Is that weird, or is it the puritan guilt work ethic?
I do recall thinking the same thing just before I retired, however once I actually retired, I never thought about it again.
__________________
HighRoller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 03:51 PM   #19
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Midpack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 11,971
Quote:
Originally Posted by HighRoller View Post
I do recall thinking the same thing just before I retired, however once I actually retired, I never thought about it again.
I haven't given it much thought either, BUT I haven't lived through my first market correction without income. I know I won't panic sell anything, but I am sure I'll get a little anxious...we'll see.

Thank goodness there's so much market history/backtesting. I slept soundly through 87, 00 & 08 and every other blip, the first 2 times 100% in equities - and staying the course was richly (pun intended) rewarded every time...
__________________
No one agrees with other people's opinions; they merely agree with their own opinions -- expressed by somebody else. Sydney Tremayne
Retired Jun 2011 at age 57

Target AA: 60% equity funds / 35% bond funds / 5% cash
Target WR: Approx 2.5% Approx 20% SI (secure income, SS only)
Midpack is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 04:31 PM   #20
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 944
I've been free since 7/1/06. I had some trouble pulling the trigger to get free and then considered an offer from another company that I had worked with in my career job that I just left.....While I was hysterically happy to be free of mega pharma as a RM - I was concerned about spending instead of saving, concerned I would not be happy/bored, concerned I would not be contributing. Well, I can't believe how fast the last 6+ years has gone and how good I am at doing what ever I want to!
I do volunteer my time about 5-7 afternoons/evenings a month and have joined a few organizations that I "align" with.

Honestly I could not be happier and my DW is enjoying all of our freedom as well..........
Every person has a different reaction, but, you are not alone with your thoughts
__________________

__________________
Freed at 49. You only live once - live it
Donzo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:29 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.