Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-30-2009, 08:52 AM   #21
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: DFW Metroplex
Posts: 112
Well I got another job, starting today. Wish me luck. Working for a small company with plans to expand once certain things fall into place. About the same pay as I made before but I get to work directly with a CEO and have a bit more control over my schedule.
__________________

__________________
MBAVisionary is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 09-30-2009, 11:30 AM   #22
Full time employment: Posting here.
citrine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 944
Congratulations!
You sound a lot like me.....I ended up doing a career change and working pt for myself and pt for someone else.....the best decision I have ever made
__________________

__________________
citrine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2009, 03:10 PM   #23
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
bbbamI's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Dallas 'burb
Posts: 9,039
__________________
There's no need to complicate, our time is short..
bbbamI is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2009, 04:37 PM   #24
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
BunsGettingFirm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,502
People with kids do have additional responsibilities, but some people use their kids, on-going medical problems, or some other commitments to get out of work early on a daily basis, and it's not just low-level employees. Our director of QA jets out of work at the drop of a hat for any number of reasons, particularly on Mondays and Fridays. I can see how covering for other people's lazy behavior can tire you out and lead you to make mistakes in a very detail-oriented job. This is a situation in which you really have to speak up for yourself. I don't enjoy confrontations either, but I threw this director of QA under the bus when she tried to shirk and pass off her own work to me. You have to or else you'll find yourself always covering for others and getting the shaft in the process.
__________________
BunsGettingFirm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2009, 05:39 PM   #25
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Milton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 2,074
Good luck with the new job! Sounds like you landed on your feet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MBAVisionary View Post
I registered on a temp agency's website yesterday. No one has called me back. I will investigate further on Monday. Perhaps I have an uppity mentality that plenty of jobs are beneath me. It's a tough mindset to break.
FWIW you are not alone, especially in your peer group: Gen Y is notorious for its sense of entitlement. At least you are aware of the problem, which is the first step to fixing it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MBAVisionary View Post
I just kind feel like after 10 years of jobs that basically involve me handling money all day I should do something different with me life. Supermarket work 99-06, then the bank 05-09. It's hard not to think things are beneath me when I feel like I missed out on some of the best years I had to challenge myself by settling for less than I'm worth.
Fair enough; but I presume that you didn't have any better options/offers, so you probably didn't have much choice but to 'settle'. Don't beat yourself up too much.

Job frustration is a big part of many people's wish for early retirement, but at your age and in your financial position you will likely have to knuckle down and resign yourself to at least another 20 years of w*rk. So, might as well make the best of it.

Your past job options were apparently limited by mediocre educational qualifications and (perhaps) social skills. It may not be too late to upgrade the former, and you can certainly polish the latter.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MBAVisionary View Post
One friend suggested a headhunter, I have never dealt with one and wonder if it truly be beneficial to hire one since my resume basically speaks for itself.
Anyone contemplating spending their hard-earned dollars on such services should read Barbara Ehrenreich's Bait and Switch: The (Futile) Pursuit of the American Dream. It's nowhere near as good as G.J. Meyer's first-person account Executive Blues: Down and Out in Corporate America, or Ehrenreich's earlier book Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America, but it does contain quite an interesting critique account of career coaches.
__________________
"To know what you prefer, instead of humbly saying Amen to what the world tells you you ought to prefer, is to have kept your soul alive". Robert Louis Stevenson, An Inland Voyage (1878)
Milton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2009, 05:51 PM   #26
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Milton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 2,074
Quote:
Originally Posted by Milton View Post
FWIW you are not alone, especially in your peer group: Gen Y is notorious for its sense of entitlement.
In all fairness to Gen Y, I should note that they do have some legitimate cause for complaint.

We all know that educational demands for entry level positions have steadily increased over the years. E.g., it is difficult to see why a commercial pilot requires a university degree, or why a retail banker needs an MBA, but those are the realities of the current job market. Unpaid internships are also becoming common. Having invested all that time, money and (presumably) effort, it is understandable why one might feel a bit cheated to wind up in a low-level position.
__________________
"To know what you prefer, instead of humbly saying Amen to what the world tells you you ought to prefer, is to have kept your soul alive". Robert Louis Stevenson, An Inland Voyage (1878)
Milton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2009, 05:54 PM   #27
Moderator Emeritus
Bestwifeever's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 16,373
Quote:
Originally Posted by MBAVisionary View Post
Well I got another job, starting today. Wish me luck. Working for a small company with plans to expand once certain things fall into place. About the same pay as I made before but I get to work directly with a CEO and have a bit more control over my schedule.
Congratulations!!!! That's wonderful that you found something in two months, in this job market. I hope you enjoy it and do well--it sounds like you will.
__________________
“Would you like an adventure now, or would you like to have your tea first?” J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan
Bestwifeever is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2009, 07:23 PM   #28
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Gotadimple's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,761
Congratulations! Thanks for letting us know.

Please keep us posted on how you like your new job.

-- Rita
__________________
Only got A dimple, would have preferred 2!
Gotadimple is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2009, 11:35 PM   #29
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: DFW Metroplex
Posts: 112
Thanks for the well wishes all! I have a friend who has been working at Kohl's for as long as I can remember. He has a Bachelor's Degree, but still isn't making much more than $8/hr. He tells me he put in lots of apps, but quantity alone isn't going to get him anywhere. In his defense, he has dyslexia but he totally needs to dabble in some new things. I feel he will let too much time go by and get into trouble paying off his loans and also be unmarketable.
__________________
MBAVisionary is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2009, 12:12 AM   #30
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: DFW Metroplex
Posts: 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by citrine View Post
Congratulations!
You sound a lot like me.....I ended up doing a career change and working pt for myself and pt for someone else.....the best decision I have ever made
citrine, sounds to me like you got your sanity back. This is great news!
__________________
MBAVisionary is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2009, 12:16 AM   #31
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: DFW Metroplex
Posts: 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Milton View Post
In all fairness to Gen Y, I should note that they do have some legitimate cause for complaint.

We all know that educational demands for entry level positions have steadily increased over the years. E.g., it is difficult to see why a commercial pilot requires a university degree, or why a retail banker needs an MBA, but those are the realities of the current job market. Unpaid internships are also becoming common. Having invested all that time, money and (presumably) effort, it is understandable why one might feel a bit cheated to wind up in a low-level position.
You're right, so many people put tons of money into education. Imagine finishing college with 100,000+ in tuition and then waiting for months only to get a job that pays $25k/yr or less. Talk about a letdown. We are taught to strive for advanced degrees to be more competitive. As individuals and as a country where we are being out innovated using a number of technologies we pioneered but never followed through to improve.

I'd work for free only if I loved what I was doing, or got the chance to work for someone who was very successful.
__________________
MBAVisionary is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2009, 11:33 AM   #32
Full time employment: Posting here.
citrine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 944
Sanity is priceless!
You know...I always thought a college degree was a good investment, but the ROI on my massage therapy certification is astounding. I am making $35/hr at massage envy and $65/hr in private practice....and working only 25-30 hours a week to maintain the same lifestyle I had when I worked in corporate.
__________________
citrine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2009, 11:37 AM   #33
Administrator
W2R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 38,860
Quote:
Originally Posted by citrine View Post
Sanity is priceless!
You know...I always thought a college degree was a good investment, but the ROI on my massage therapy certification is astounding. I am making $35/hr at massage envy and $65/hr in private practice....and working only 25-30 hours a week to maintain the same lifestyle I had when I worked in corporate.
Citrine, that is wonderful! I knew that massage therapy was a career that you felt would make you happy, but I never dreamed that you would be making that kind of money doing it. Congratulations!
__________________
Already we are boldly launched upon the deep; but soon we shall be lost in its unshored, harbourless immensities.

- - H. Melville, 1851
W2R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2009, 11:39 AM   #34
Full time employment: Posting here.
citrine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 944
Thanks Want2Retire.....it is an amazing field and there are so many opportunities that have yet to blow up!
__________________
citrine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2009, 12:09 PM   #35
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 13,271
Quote:
Originally Posted by citrine View Post
Sanity is priceless!
You know...I always thought a college degree was a good investment, but the ROI on my massage therapy certification is astounding. I am making $35/hr at massage envy and $65/hr in private practice....and working only 25-30 hours a week to maintain the same lifestyle I had when I worked in corporate.
Just a question... are you actually working 25-30 hours a week or only billing that amount of time?

One of the problems with working by the hour... you usually are not busy all the time and do not get paid for those lost hours.... in your example, $35 per hour for 40 per week is a $70K per year gig... but since you do not get paid for vacation and holidays... maybe you are down to $55K or so if you take time off and do not fill up a week.... not bad at all, but not like a $35 per hour office worker...
__________________
Texas Proud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2009, 12:13 PM   #36
Full time employment: Posting here.
citrine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 944
Texas....I am actually working for 25-30 hrs. Our location is fairly new so I still have my Cobra insurance and we will be getting holidays/vacation pay once we hit a certain amount of members.
__________________
citrine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2009, 06:32 PM   #37
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
harley's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Following the nice weather
Posts: 6,428
Quote:
Originally Posted by MBAVisionary View Post
You're right, so many people put tons of money into education. Imagine finishing college with 100,000+ in tuition and then waiting for months only to get a job that pays $25k/yr or less. Talk about a letdown. We are taught to strive for advanced degrees to be more competitive.
I can barely imagine that, but I also think that putting a little forethought into the process could help avoid the problem. My SisIL put one son through private college at ~$40K/year. Majoring in Sacred Music might be fascinating, but never had much of a chance of being worth the cost. Now he's considering a Masters. More cost, probably won't make much of a difference salary wise.

The other son is currently in a good school (near the same cost), but is majoring in Astronautical Engineering. His degree and advanced degrees will cost a lot, but have a good chance of having a decent ROI.

I realize many are having to get lower paying jobs in non-major fields due to the crappy economy. That's just bad luck, which comes and goes. Not their fault for the most part. Just one of those character building things that I've spent most of my life trying to avoid.
__________________
"Good judgment comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement." - Will Rogers, or maybe Sam Clemens
DW and I - FIREd at 50 (7/06), living off assets
harley is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2009, 08:50 AM   #38
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
BunsGettingFirm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,502
That's because character building is fun and makes for good stories only in retrospect.

As for some of the responses to the OP's use of a headhunter, I find that head hunter aren't "useless". They do the same thing a broker does especially for cross-country job hunts. Just make sure that you use a reputable agency and one that charges only success fees from the employer. I have never worked with one that wanted a fee up front.
__________________
BunsGettingFirm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2010, 05:40 AM   #39
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: DFW Metroplex
Posts: 112
Update: I have posted in a few other threads here. I like LI overall, but often I question whether I want to stay. I graduated with an MBA in 2008 and haven't moved up very much since getting it. I quit my job working for a credit union because I didn't see much of a future for me there. Right now I'm working as a part-time assistant. I have suggested getting more hours, but my boss does a lot of traveling. On days he is gone or has meetings I generally don't do any work. I can fluctuate from 6 hours a week to 30, but there is no consistency. Looking at all my options. I am 26 years old.

I like my boss, but from a sheer numbers perspective, I either need more hours, a part-time evening job or a full-time job. Moving is not out of the picture either.

I don't think I'll ever be able to buy a house here on a single income. Apartment would be doable depending on future wages, but my goal now is to pay off my 48k of debt. Kinda hard doing that with what can vary from 1000-1400/mo (less once I claim taxes). I really need to do make some kind of major change fast. Looking for jobs as an entry level MBA, but most of those jobs want someone with many years of experience in a given field.

Not really sure what the smart move to do. I don't regret the choices I have made. No sense in staying in a dead-end job for almost 4 years, despite going on interviews to branch out to other departments. It was a bit shady to begin with, the last promotion I got, the person whose job I was replacing was on vacation and had no idea he was being demoted until after the fact.

A friend of mine later this year may have an apartment for me to rent, asking for around 500-600/mo. However at this rate there is no way I'd be able to afford that.

My current debt picture:
5k savings
400 in cc debt (to be paid off next week)
41,500 student loans
6000 car loan (vehicle is worth around 15k right now, has 28k miles and warranty till 100k/mi for most components and 120k for transmission).

Not sure what I should do. I feel like all the jobs I've worked in the past were very simple in nature. Cashier, Teller, Head Teller, Assistant. It's proven very challenging to break the mold. I am in need of work generally when it comes to doing job interviews. The point of just proving I am qualified for the position to start with. I have looked at usajobs, listings in both counties here on LI and NYC (which I'm kind of avoiding due to 12+ hours of travel each week), monster.com, local college job sites, indeed.com, monster.com, snag-a-job. I see years of experience required along with certifications in x y z and just glance over it. Or I see a job and think to myself ok whoever does this will become a slave. I see people who have worked as managers in retail and they often are burned out.

Is my logic flawed? What should I do? I'm trying to follow Dave Ramsey's concepts for getting out of debt but don't think finding a job that pays 8-9/hr is worthwhile. Trying to be positive but also realistic. I really like the Richmond Va area and want to move there, but not without a FT job lined up. Been searching everyday and nothing that fits my bill in terms of pay (high 30s and up)
__________________
MBAVisionary is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2010, 10:32 AM   #40
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
harley's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Following the nice weather
Posts: 6,428
Quote:
Originally Posted by MBAVisionary View Post
Update: I have posted in a few other threads here. I like LI overall, but often I question whether I want to stay. I graduated with an MBA in 2008 and haven't moved up very much since getting it.
.
.
.
Is my logic flawed? What should I do? I'm trying to follow Dave Ramsey's concepts for getting out of debt but don't think finding a job that pays 8-9/hr is worthwhile. Trying to be positive but also realistic. I really like the Richmond Va area and want to move there, but not without a FT job lined up. Been searching everyday and nothing that fits my bill in terms of pay (high 30s and up)
I think you aren't viscerally aware that the economy is truly in the tank right now. It's just not a good time to be job hopping and expecting big raises. I doubt if it's any consolation, but this too shall pass. I was talking to my 25 y.o. DD the other day about this same subject. I did some calculating and discovered that over my 28 year career, only 6 years accounted for (inflation adjusted) ~70% of my salary increases. The rest of the time I was basically crawling along at or just above the inflation rate.

My suggestion is to find and keep a job you like OK, live as simply as you can while times are rough, and wait for better times. Obviously you need to continuously try to position yourself for better opportunities, but be realistic. Relocating is fine, but as you said, find a job first. It just sucks out there right now, and it probably seems like if you don't make your move now you never will. But seriously, nothing stays the same. What comes around, goes around. To everything (turn turn turn) there is a season. And a bunch of other old fogey cliches. Good luck.
__________________

__________________
"Good judgment comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement." - Will Rogers, or maybe Sam Clemens
DW and I - FIREd at 50 (7/06), living off assets
harley is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Starting over, really from the get go. Yankees Rule FIRE and Money 2 11-23-2008 05:49 PM
Starting Over sanman12 FIRE and Money 4 10-11-2008 01:51 PM
How to learn an instrument from scratch? brewer12345 Other topics 31 08-15-2008 08:29 AM
Starting from scratch amy Life after FIRE 18 07-31-2004 07:47 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:56 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.