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Old 03-07-2014, 12:57 PM   #21
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Any particular reason for taking ss at 67? Off the cuff it appears as though you have the assets to cover your income needs through your 60's, and if you can afford it the approximately 25% bump in payout is nice.
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Old 03-07-2014, 01:04 PM   #22
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Don't know where else to post this...

This is the only site I've ever seen where people post their honest financial numbers and get advice. Kudos to all of you knowledgeable "been there done that" folks who share their perspective on how to get off the wheel in the hamster cage of the work environment. In our offline lives we are much more secretive.
Most of the other sites use the "I know a friend who has 3.6M net worth with 2.1M in taxable...", approach . I actually have connected with 2 people in the real world that are also on this board, but I make no attempt to hide.

But I wanted to suggest Retirement Calculator - Parameter Form if you haven't tried it. You've probably already have all of the inputs at hand. It will probably tell you that you don't need to do the part-time unless it enhances your well being from an emotional standpoint, and that you need to spend more, . And besides that, which accounts to spend from first. The tool is unique in that it uses a linear program to determine an optimal way to spend by account type (tIRA, Roth, etc), within the constraints of the model of course. Most other tools use the rule of thumb "first taxable, then tIRA, last Roth", or some variation like that.
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Old 08-14-2014, 08:36 PM   #23
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My personal update, and a diatribe:

20 workdays left. One calendar month.

Many people in my workplace are fearful of my retirement. Nurses, secretaries, aides, they are expressing themselves. Last week a new OB I barely knew wanted to have lunch with me. One person today expressed utter dismay at my leaving. She was a ward secretary who treated me horribly until I sat down with her 7 years ago and had a heart to heart conversation with her, explaining my utter lack of "physician arrogance", transforming her relationship to all the physicians she worked with from negative to positive in a few minutes. She turned into an instant fan. Today she told me she was scared of my leaving.

It breaks my heart that she feels that way. I have been one if the anchors in our group. It is disturbing that our group itself isn't the anchor.

If everyone in the work had the attitude of Harry Truman, that "the buck stops here," our lives would be transformed. If the work world woulda game on anyone understand that no person should work so hard and long that they forget who they are our world would be so much different. My profession has too long glorified excessive hours on the job. Shame on them.


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Old 08-15-2014, 05:44 PM   #24
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Congratulations.
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Old 08-21-2014, 09:21 PM   #25
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Pulling out my introductory thread again. It appears our medical director is pulling out the OMY routine on me. I have 16 work days left, and he has asked me to consider working at our second hospital in a different capacity. The stress level on mind and body is about 1/5 that where I work now. The money would be about half and doesn't include health insurance.

It would help with expenses this next 12 months but is it worth it?

I don't know, I guess we'll make the old pros and cons list and see how it shapes up.


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Old 08-21-2014, 10:12 PM   #26
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As you said, it all depends. But if this involves being on call, my personal response would be "over my dead body!"
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Old 08-22-2014, 12:10 AM   #27
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I agree with meadbh. They are having some remorse about not letting you do as you originally planned and asking you to leave earlier than you wanted to. Now they see they need you. Frankly I would leave as planned.

Do you really need the money that much? You were ready to leave in 2 weeks.

Also tell them no on call. I haven't done any for 3 years and before the j*b prior to this last one I hadn't done call for about 6 years. In other words when I hit my early 50's I refused to be on call except for 1 fateful year in 2010.

If you find you really need money you can always pick up some contracted or locums work somewhere, no?

Good luck!


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Old 08-22-2014, 04:08 AM   #28
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I actually did the job over Christmas last year when they were desperate. The contract with the hospital us a financial sinkhole for the group and the hospital. There's practically no patients. I won't be handling any phone calls unless I'm needed to do an admit. In residency I only really liked hospital work. The lack of being busy makes it appealing. They're going to pay someone to do this anyone and I'


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Old 08-22-2014, 04:16 AM   #29
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(didn't finish) and it could be me. Realize the group are my friends and colleagues, so it makes it hard to decide. DH likes the idea for my sanity. Going from 15 hr days on my feet in a hospital with pathetic nurse managers and hostile inner city patients who steal baby blankets to a rural environment with very nice staff and free food might be a welcome transition. Going from what I do now to no work and no identity as a physician is actually a little daunting.

I would barely be working one week a month.

Thanks for the input. Please keep talking me out of it.


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Old 08-22-2014, 04:28 AM   #30
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Sounds like a relatively stress-free way to transition into FIREd status, and the extra money would be nice. How long would you have to commit to doing it for? Can you say you're willing to give it a try for 1-2 months first? Then if you don't like it you can easily pull the plug and walk away.
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Old 08-22-2014, 05:46 AM   #31
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Before I retired from medicine I was able to cut back my time and give up the most stressful parts of my job. It made work much better for awhile and actually helped me hang in there until my son finished college. Eventually even the part time got old as I was ready to move on. If there is no call, the job is low stress and you really only have to work about one week per month, you might like it and it could be a nice transition for you. I say take the job if you want to, live off your retirement budget and see how it goes for awhile. The beauty of being financially independent is that you have the opportunity to create the life that you want. The retirement police will say you aren't really retired but who cares? Go with your gut.
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Old 08-22-2014, 06:03 AM   #32
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(didn't finish) and it could be me. Realize the group are my friends and colleagues, so it makes it hard to decide. DH likes the idea for my sanity. Going from 15 hr days on my feet in a hospital with pathetic nurse managers and hostile inner city patients who steal baby blankets to a rural environment with very nice staff and free food might be a welcome transition. Going from what I do now to no work and no identity as a physician is actually a little daunting.

I would barely be working one week a month.

Thanks for the input. Please keep talking me out of it.
Here's how I would look at it.

You are retiring from your job. Now, in retirement, you get to choose what you want to do with your time. If you decide to do a part-time job, because you WANT to do it, to me you have not "un-retired", you have not "changed your mind" or backed off your original plan. It's choosing to do what YOU want to do, and you simply happen to get paid for it.

But don't let money be part of the decision-making process.
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Old 08-22-2014, 09:09 AM   #33
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(didn't finish) and it could be me. Realize the group are my friends and colleagues, so it makes it hard to decide. DH likes the idea for my sanity. Going from 15 hr days on my feet in a hospital with pathetic nurse managers and hostile inner city patients who steal baby blankets to a rural environment with very nice staff and free food might be a welcome transition. Going from what I do now to no work and no identity as a physician is actually a little daunting.

I would barely be working one week a month.

Thanks for the input. Please keep talking me out of it.


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It doesn't sound too bad. In your situation I would give it a try for 6 months.
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Old 08-22-2014, 03:06 PM   #34
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It doesn't sound too bad. In your situation I would give it a try for 6 months.
I was thinking the exact same thing. Take a few weeks off and then give it a try and see if you like it. Tell them you'll commit to x months and then decide if you want to continue but if you decide to leave that you'll give them plenty of advance notice to find a replacement. Win-win.
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Old 08-22-2014, 04:40 PM   #35
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How do you feel about the idea that they wouldn't help with your work or stress level until they almost broke you? I'd be kind of resentful of that kind of self serving behavior even if some of these people are your friends....it doesn't seem like a very nurturing work environment. You might feel better leaving them completely and looking around for something part time on your terms, if that's what you want to do.
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Old 08-22-2014, 10:23 PM   #36
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I found out more about it today.

My partners are also under huge stresses. My partners aren't the problem. The hospital environment has taken away space for physicians to do any charting. There's no place to sit. It's hopelessly noisy (staff!!). It gets busier every year. We have virtually no power over many aspects of our patient's care. The unit I work in has a very difficult nurse manager.

My partners are my friends too. At the second hospital, we started a new program. The second hospital is really nice and docs are treated with respect.

If looks like the position is temporary and is really in anticipation of an emergency physician shortage in the group. It might not even happen.

What 's nuts is that working two weeks a month pays 50% more than I made before, which is upsetting.


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Old 08-22-2014, 10:39 PM   #37
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Okay, you're going from a high stress full time position to a part time low stress position that pays 50% more?

I did that for one that paid just a bit less than the job I retired from. I stayed five years and only left because things changed radically for the worse. Otherwise I would have stayed for a couple more years.
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Old 08-22-2014, 10:48 PM   #38
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I found out more about it today.

My partners are also under huge stresses. My partners aren't the problem. The hospital environment has taken away space for physicians to do any charting. There's no place to sit. It's hopelessly noisy (staff!!). It gets busier every year. We have virtually no power over many aspects of our patient's care. The unit I work in has a very difficult nurse manager.

My partners are my friends too. At the second hospital, we started a new program. The second hospital is really nice and docs are treated with respect.

If looks like the position is temporary and is really in anticipation of an emergency physician shortage in the group. It might not even happen.

What 's nuts is that working two weeks a month pays 50% more than I made before, which is upsetting.


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I think you should do it.
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Old 08-22-2014, 11:18 PM   #39
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Whatever you decide to do, you can always change your mind and retire.

OTOH, there's such a shortage in medicine I think there's no way to not be too busy unless one really retires. At least that's been my experience.

I hope I can go to 1 day a week in 4/2015. Wonder if that can really happen. But I too am making so much more on my 3 day a week schedule than I did driving 133 miles round trip daily 5 days a week.

Go figure.


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Old 08-23-2014, 01:40 PM   #40
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I like prudent_one's logic. You are still retiring, but now you can work because you want to. Look at it as extra fun money to use for some vacation which sounds like you need to do and can take advantage of. The beauty of your situation is working because you want to, not because you have to. If the stress becomes too much or the time becomes more than the orig plan, you can leave. Seems like only positive for you, assuming the work is good.
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