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01 Harley Dyna Glide
Old 01-06-2014, 09:01 PM   #1
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01 Harley Dyna Glide

In the market for a new bike (been bike-less the past 2 years) - have located a 2001 FXD Dyna-Glide with 18k miles. Has saddlebags, short sissy bar, shorty pipes, luggage rack, extended forward foot controls .... otherwise it's pretty stock.

Fellow has come down to 5k on it and has agreed to take it over to my trusted mechanic (recommended to me by others) who will give it a mechanical/electrical inspect including test ride & put it through it's paces for only $30. I rode it for about 10 minutes myself ... feels real comfortable, seems to fit me well. (I am 6'2 185 - the forward controls feel real good) My previous bikes were a Yamaha RD-200 when I was a teen, a 1981 XLH (1000 cc bored .80 over with a hot cam), a Yamaha, TW-200, and a Suzuki Volusia 800 ... so this will be the biggest bike I've ever owned. I rode my previous bikes a lot when I owned them & have taken an MSC, so feel pretty comfortable about riding.

Current owner has only had it a year. Bought it from a Navy kid & doesn't know the bikes prior history, except that he's been riding it twice a week on average with zero issues. Rubber looks good, brake pads about half-worn. Cosmetically, 1 small dent in the tank & the alum on the front fork legs could use some polishing.

Plan on riding it by myself, no passenger --- mostly local jaunts down county highways out in the country once or twice a week & 3 or 4 times per year I plan on two to three week trips to visit friends across the country & ride approx 200 mile per day with 2 to 4 days in between legs.

Anyone have experience with this particular year/model? It's a carb - they didn't start doing fuel inject on this model till a couple years later.

Thanks in advance for any opinions/advice.
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Old 01-07-2014, 08:21 AM   #2
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Seems on the surface like a pretty sweet deal. I've always liked the looks of the HD wide glide. Good luck and go with your gut.
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Old 01-07-2014, 12:50 PM   #3
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Showed the OP to DH and he responded with this:

"the '99-'05 Dynas (TC88 engine) all had very weak spring-operated cam chain tensioners, on which the phenolic friction material tended to pit & fall apart in some models. In many cases, when that happened, the small pieces destroyed the oil pump. It was difficult to predict because the longevity of the tensioners depended upon the manufacturing quality of the cam chains (2 of them) on which the tensioners rested. Some tensioners have been known to last 80K miles, but most tend to be shot after 15-20K miles. He should ask the seller if they have been replaced or upgraded with the '06 hydraulic upgrade, or gear-driven cams. If not, they must be checked immediately. Replacement is not a small job, and can cost $400+ if done by dealer."

I don't have a clue what any of this means, but perhaps it helps.
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Old 01-07-2014, 03:14 PM   #4
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Now for something even less useful but perhaps more heart-felt. retiredatfifty, you are obviously a "biker" from "way back", so this probably doesn't apply: The biggest "bike" I had ever really ridden (as in several miles) was a Honda 50 (yeah, I know - that ain't a bike). But since I was a teen, I had wanted a real bike. FIL "inherited" a 350 KAW from his son (long story). I rode it once and was hooked. This was when I was perhaps 35 and should have been past such nonsense.

So, I have a good friend (15 years younger) who is a hard core biker. I asked him to help me look for a bike (had my heart set on a 350 KAW). One day, he showed up at my house with a 900 KAW. He told me to get on the back. Honestly, I didn't know the etiquette of riding as a back seat passenger - especially on a bike without a sissy bar. Do you "gingerly" place your hands on your buddy's hips, do you hold onto his shoulders? What? So buddy takes me to the highway and blasts off. It was then I knew what to do with my hands. I put a death grip around his middle and held on for dear life. I could just see the speedo as we wound to 110 and back to 0 between two stop lights on the city by-pass.

I told my buddy I was just-now out of the bike-looking phase - which I'm certain is what he intended. I wasn't cut out for it. I'd lived that long without a bike and I would probably live a lot longer without one. Only reason I mention this is the fact that you have been without a bike for 2 years. Maybe you've been given a "second chance' by the bike demons (or gods - whichever you prefer). Maybe retirement will last longer without a bike. No offense intended. It's just a thought as YMMV.
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Old 01-07-2014, 04:48 PM   #5
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I could just see the speedo as we wound to 110 and back to 0 between two stop lights on the city by-pass.
He did you a disservice, much as (a few) dang fool airplane pilots do when they take someone up for a first ride and then scares the daylights out of him, and that passenger will never willingly get on an airplane again.

Me, I haven't grown up yet. I bought this Suzuki C90T after 32 years of non-riding. I bought and studied a bunch of books on the topic, took the class, and for the first 100 miles or so I almost never left the housing development except to go to a school parking lot on Sundays for practice where there was more room.

Any idiot can slam the throttle open on a straight. It takes some finesse to maneuver a heavy bike in a crowded parking lot. BTW, I weigh 150 lbs. and the bike is a tad over 800.
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File Type: jpg bike_ride-1.jpg (228.1 KB, 7 views)
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Old 01-07-2014, 06:03 PM   #6
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Except for a couple of short rides down the road I've been off my motorcycles for 4 years now due to 3 back surgeries (unrelated to the bikes). It's been driving me nuts! I can't wait to start riding regularly again and take a few trips. I do understand your reservations Koolau. There are way too many people on the road that don't pay attention to motorcycles and bicycles. Couple that with the increasing number of idiots using their cell phones and texting even driving a car can get quite dangerous.

It sounds like retiredatfifty has a good plan to ride safely and avoid the more dangerous roads.

Cheers!
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Old 01-07-2014, 06:06 PM   #7
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He did you a disservice, much as (a few) dang fool airplane pilots do when they take someone up for a first ride and then scares the daylights out of him, and that passenger will never willingly get on an airplane again.

Me, I haven't grown up yet. I bought this Suzuki C90T after 32 years of non-riding. I bought and studied a bunch of books on the topic, took the class, and for the first 100 miles or so I almost never left the housing development except to go to a school parking lot on Sundays for practice where there was more room.

Any idiot can slam the throttle open on a straight. It takes some finesse to maneuver a heavy bike in a crowded parking lot. BTW, I weigh 150 lbs. and the bike is a tad over 800.
Nice bike! My first was a C50 and had the drive shaft out of a C90 reworked to fit it. Made a huge difference in the C50 at highway speeds.

Cheers!
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Old 01-07-2014, 06:23 PM   #8
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......... I bought this Suzuki C90T ..........
Hmmm....... Is it my imagination or does this slightly resemble a Harley?
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Old 01-07-2014, 11:16 PM   #9
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Showed the OP to DH and he responded with this:

"the '99-'05 Dynas (TC88 engine) all had very weak spring-operated cam chain tensioners, on which the phenolic friction material tended to pit & fall apart in some models. In many cases, when that happened, the small pieces destroyed the oil pump. It was difficult to predict because the longevity of the tensioners depended upon the manufacturing quality of the cam chains (2 of them) on which the tensioners rested. Some tensioners have been known to last 80K miles, but most tend to be shot after 15-20K miles. He should ask the seller if they have been replaced or upgraded with the '06 hydraulic upgrade, or gear-driven cams. If not, they must be checked immediately. Replacement is not a small job, and can cost $400+ if done by dealer."

I don't have a clue what any of this means, but perhaps it helps.
Thanks Bubba, that's very helpful. Sounds like a mod I could do myself as I am handy with a wrench & a good "parts-changer." Will have to do some research. If you get a chance ask your DH if that's something the home mechanic can handle pretty easily.
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Old 01-07-2014, 11:21 PM   #10
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.... Maybe retirement will last longer without a bike. No offense intended. It's just a thought as YMMV.
Didn't survive a couple of hazardous careers and otherwise live a very financially responsible life just so I could retire at 50 and sit at home doing needlepoint (and that's not to say there's anything wrong with enjoying doing needlepoint.) I also scuba dive. I suppose my retirement could last longer without that too, but .... what would be the point? Looking back on a few situations I've been in over the years, I sometimes consider myself to be on borrowed time anyway. No offense intended (and none taken.) My mileage does vary.
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Old 01-07-2014, 11:22 PM   #11
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Hmmm....... Is it my imagination or does this slightly resemble a Harley?
Perhaps. But the Suzukis are pretty sweet in their own right.
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Old 01-08-2014, 04:43 AM   #12
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Hmmm....... Is it my imagination or does this slightly resemble a Harley?
No doubt it is styled to resemble a Harley. But it's also almost half the price and as far as I can tell the build quality is just fine. 24K miles and no issues so far.
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Old 01-08-2014, 08:07 AM   #13
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Thanks Bubba, that's very helpful. Sounds like a mod I could do myself as I am handy with a wrench & a good "parts-changer." Will have to do some research. If you get a chance ask your DH if that's something the home mechanic can handle pretty easily.
I asked and this is what he said:

"Yes you can do it, but it requires some HD-specific tools, and the very FIRST thing needed is an HD service manual. I'm a semi-competent home mechanic, & I've done it on my '04 FXDP twice. First, drain the oil & remove the cam chest cover on the RT side of the engine & check the current tensioners. You may be lucky, and they may be OK - for a while anyway. Once coverís off, the outer chain tensioner will be immediately obvious (see pic). Must cock it back (against the spring tension) to get a good look at the working face, and that normally requires a special tool such as tensioner unloader 320500 available here (http://www.georges-garage.com/tc_engine_1.htm). You must also get a look at the inner tensioner and it is at the top & behind the large cam plate you are looking at when you remove the cam chest cover. It can be unloaded against spring pressure very carefully without removing the cam plate using a small screwdriver, then insert a small nail through cam plate to hold it. Using a small dental mirror (cheap, lighted ones available in pharmacy section of grocery store), take a close look at the friction face. It is critical to get a good look at the inner tensioner since it is usually the one that wears out first. If the friction faces are badly pitted, cracked, pieces missing, or worn down more than 1/8", tensioners should be replaced.

Replacing tensioners requires both outer cam sprockets & chain to be removed, then total removal of the cam plate to get at the inner tensioner. When the cam plate is removed, both cams will come out with the plate (all lifters must be raised off the cams first). Either the OEM pushrods must be cut out & replaced with S&S adjustables, or the tank and rocker covers/rockers must be removed. The inner (in the crankcase) and outer (in the cam plate) cam bearings must be replaced upon removal, and that takes tool 320510 cam remover, and tool 320550 cam bearing extractor, and a 5-ton press.

It is a big job, involving precision work on critical parts, requiring very careful attention to detail, parts fitting, and locktite usage (HD's like to shake bolts loose), but if I can do it, you can do it (and save yourself many hundred$).

BTW, the price quoted on the FXD sounds very fair if itís in good shape. The Sons of Anarchy TV show (in which star rides an FXDX) has significantly enhanced market value of Dynas recently."
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Old 01-08-2014, 08:30 AM   #14
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Sounds like a good deal to me. You're not going to find a big-twin Harley that runs for much less than that. Sounds like you miss riding. So go for it, even if there might end up being a couple of unexpected expenses that come with it (there probably will).

I'm also of the camp that believes avoiding risk activities because you might get hurt is for the birds. To each their own, but piddling around doing safe things so you can enjoy a longer "life" strikes me as the height of loss. I own four motorcycles (Harley Road King, BMW R1200GS, BMW K1200RS, and Suzuki GSX-R1000) and a great deal of my retirement expectation is wrapped up in being able to ride them more.
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Old 01-08-2014, 08:35 AM   #15
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No doubt it is styled to resemble a Harley. But it's also almost half the price and as far as I can tell the build quality is just fine. 24K miles and no issues so far.
I'm teasin' ya. If I hadn't decided to hang up my helmet, I'd probably be riding a Gold Wing or similar.
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Old 01-08-2014, 10:05 AM   #16
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Sounds like a good deal to me. I had a Dyna a few years ago and liked it alot very smooth while moving....But be ready to rock and roll at idle. Harleys have come a long way in the reliable dept - only real weak link are the darn tensioners as discussed - you can get rid of the chain and tensioners by fitting a primary gear. Also the stators tend to go out because they are installed in a very hot area of the motor. Fun classic styled bike!

I now have a Victory Cross Road 106ci bagger - and flat out love it!
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Old 01-08-2014, 03:55 PM   #17
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I owned a 97 Dyna Glide. It was a great bike, especially if you ride alone. A bit small if you have a passenger on the back most of the time. I wish I still had mine. I sold it and bought an 06 Road King. A really great bike. But as I get older, 68, the Road King is getting a bit heavy. Twice now I have stopped and put the feet down and a bit of sand made my foot slip a bit and it was almost impossible for me to hold the bike upright. With the Dyna weighing 200 pounds less it was easy. I love the RK but will probably sell it sometime soon to buy something a bit lighter. This Dyna sounds like a good buy so I would grab it.
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Old 01-12-2014, 07:34 PM   #18
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Had the low rider then the Dyna wide glide wow that was a clean ride. Now the Electra Classic very plush a bit disgusting having a radio. Looking to go cross country this yr. I really miss the Dyna WG, so nice. Ride safe
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Old 01-12-2014, 11:55 PM   #19
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In the market for a new bike (been bike-less the past 2 years) - have located a 2001 FXD Dyna-Glide with 18k miles. Has saddlebags, short sissy bar, shorty pipes, luggage rack, extended forward foot controls .... otherwise it's pretty stock.

Fellow has come down to 5k on it and has agreed to take it over to my trusted mechanic (recommended to me by others) who will give it a mechanical/electrical inspect including test ride & put it through it's paces for only $30. I rode it for about 10 minutes myself ... feels real comfortable, seems to fit me well. (I am 6'2 185 - the forward controls feel real good) My previous bikes were a Yamaha RD-200 when I was a teen, a 1981 XLH (1000 cc bored .80 over with a hot cam), a Yamaha, TW-200, and a Suzuki Volusia 800 ... so this will be the biggest bike I've ever owned. I rode my previous bikes a lot when I owned them & have taken an MSC, so feel pretty comfortable about riding.

Current owner has only had it a year. Bought it from a Navy kid & doesn't know the bikes prior history, except that he's been riding it twice a week on average with zero issues. Rubber looks good, brake pads about half-worn. Cosmetically, 1 small dent in the tank & the alum on the front fork legs could use some polishing.

Plan on riding it by myself, no passenger --- mostly local jaunts down county highways out in the country once or twice a week & 3 or 4 times per year I plan on two to three week trips to visit friends across the country & ride approx 200 mile per day with 2 to 4 days in between legs.

Anyone have experience with this particular year/model? It's a carb - they didn't start doing fuel inject on this model till a couple years later.

Thanks in advance for any opinions/advice.
Bought the bike. First I took i by a recommended MC mechanic who has his own small shop for a pre-purchase inspection. Had it checked mechanical,electirical & went for a checkout ride. No issues except seems to be running a bit lean & front tire will be due for changng in 6 months to a year. He also said not to worry abou the chain tensior till 30k miles & to do it then. Soooo - I paid 5k for the bike, abut $450 for sales tax, title tranfer fee, registration, and couple other small fees I don't rember.
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Old 01-13-2014, 12:42 AM   #20
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Congrats great score
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