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Old 04-22-2009, 02:18 PM   #21
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What I want to know is this...

Close to 40% of fatal traffic accidents are alcohol related. A lot of violence involves alcohol. Yet, alcohol is legal. (Why is that?)

We all know smoking cigarettes causes numerous diseases. Yet, smoking cigarettes is legal. (Why is that? Seriously.)

Is marijuana supposed to be worse than alcohol or cigarettes?
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Old 04-23-2009, 11:02 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dex View Post
"Discussing drug policy is like discussing gun control or abortion: facts are irrelevant."
On the Legalization or Not of Marijuana - Freakonomics Blog - NYTimes.com
It's interesting that you pull out that quote. The person you are quoting is pointing out that the facts are irrelevant because they are all on the side of reform.

I agree that the lack of specific alternatives and the all-or-nothing dichotomy of some legalizers are legitimate criticisms. I don't understand, however, your recommended approach (which I initially took as a joke, but since you repeat it here I'll address it).

The first four steps sound just like our current policy, and the comment to give soma to everyone ... well ... I don't get it. What are you trying to say here?
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Old 04-24-2009, 12:01 PM   #23
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I think NPR got it pretty much right. Kids, people with addictive natures, and people who don't have good judgement would be worse off because they'd get more access to something that can harm them (kinda like credit cards). Nobody would die directly of overdoses, but there would be a few more road accidents and lung cancer deaths. Then again, perhaps if people could partake openly they wouldn't have to sneak off to their cars to get stoned and so there might actually be fewer road accidents.

The tax benefits would be real, but relatively minor in comparison with the savings from not waging the drug war and incarcerating the captives. The biggest benefit would be the lives saved by stopping the violence associated with the black market and drug war.

One benefit that doesn't get discussed much is respect for the rule of law. Given that most of our recent US presidents have smoked it without being prosecuted, the status quo teaches people that it's okay to break the law. Legalization would give teens one less reason to hate "the man". Police officers (many of whom use pot) would have less of an "us against them" mentality.
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Old 04-24-2009, 01:02 PM   #24
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I laughed at the part of the article that described it as low calorie. Not once the munchies hit....
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Old 04-24-2009, 02:41 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by free4now View Post
I think NPR got it pretty much right. Kids, people with addictive natures, and people who don't have good judgement would be worse off because they'd get more access to something that can harm them (kinda like credit cards). Nobody would die directly of overdoses, but there would be a few more road accidents and lung cancer deaths. Then again, perhaps if people could partake openly they wouldn't have to sneak off to their cars to get stoned and so there might actually be fewer road accidents.

The tax benefits would be real, but relatively minor in comparison with the savings from not waging the drug war and incarcerating the captives. The biggest benefit would be the lives saved by stopping the violence associated with the black market and drug war.

One benefit that doesn't get discussed much is respect for the rule of law. Given that most of our recent US presidents have smoked it without being prosecuted, the status quo teaches people that it's okay to break the law. Legalization would give teens one less reason to hate "the man". Police officers (many of whom use pot) would have less of an "us against them" mentality.
It does seem ridiculous (ironic?) that the majority of Baby Boomers who want to be seen as 'tough on drugs' smoked pot at one time.
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Old 04-24-2009, 08:57 PM   #26
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It does seem ridiculous (ironic?) that the majority of Baby Boomers who want to be seen as 'tough on drugs' smoked pot at one time.
I doubt that more than half of 75.8 million baby boomers smoked pot once.

An American Pastime: Smoking Pot - TIME
Researchers found that 42% of people surveyed in the U.S. had tried marijuana at least once, and 16% had tried cocaine. About 20% of residents surveyed in the Netherlands,

Adolescents' drug use down, baby boomers' is up - The Boston Globe
Drug use increased among the 50-59 age group as more baby boomers joined that category. Their past month drug use rose from 4.3 percent in 2006 to 5 percent in 2007.
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