Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Anti-moth vacuum suit protector bags
Old 05-17-2014, 01:06 PM   #1
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
haha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Hooverville
Posts: 22,384
Anti-moth vacuum suit protector bags

I few years ago I lost a good cashmere sweater and a couple very nice sport coats to moths. So I bought some of those vacuum bags- some small ones to be laid in a drawer and some larger ones to keep suits or coats hanging.

I put my wools and cashmere away about a month ago, but today I noticed that the vacuum was gone. When I originally sealed them they seemed tight, and really held a good vacuum using my little vacuum cleaner. But today I was rooting around in the closet and both bags had admitted air and would not have guarded against moths. I re-pulled the vacuum, checked the seams and all seemed well.

This may work this time, but if not, does one just have to expect to buy these bags annually or bi-annually, or are they ordinarily more reliable?

Is there a better technique? I formerly used moth balls, but then I had to run to a dry cleaner every fall to get rid of the stink. One of the items is a very large, very warm wool blanket that I only need around here every few years, but when it does get cold I really appreciate it and I don't like to heat my bedroom for sleeping. Same with the overcoat. Don't need it every year, but it is god looking and very warm when it gets cold or if I have to go east.

Any idea either on using these better, replacing them more often, or trying another method?

Ha
__________________

__________________
"As a general rule, the more dangerous or inappropriate a conversation, the more interesting it is."-Scott Adams
haha is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 05-17-2014, 01:17 PM   #2
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Free To Canoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Cooksburg,PA
Posts: 1,738
If the vacuum in the bags lasts more than 24 hours, I think it is safe to say that no insect could get inside and therefore you are safe (unless eggs were laid in there beforehand).
__________________

__________________
Free to canoe
Free To Canoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2014, 08:07 PM   #3
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 18,271
I got curious about this, found a few links, but Wiki had it summarized well:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tineola_bisselliella

Quote:
Cryofumigation – Fumigating an object with dry ice, that is enclosing it in a plastic bag for 3–5 days with dry ice so it is effectively bathed in a high concentration of carbon dioxide, denied oxygen, and thus will kill all stages of clothing moths. For details, see Clothes Moths Management Guidelines, under "Household Furnishings".

Dry cleaning – This step kills moths on existing clothing and helps remove moisture from clothes

Freezing – Freezing the object for several days at temperatures below 18 °F (−8 °C)[6]

Heat (120 °F or 49 °C for 30 minutes or more) – these conditions may possibly be achieved by placing infested materials in an attic in warm weather, or by washing clothes at or above this temperature. Specialist pest controllers can also provide various methods of heat treatment for this very purpose.

Nitrogen anoxia – Similar to Cryofumigation, but using dry nitrogen gas to exclude oxygen[7]
In some other links, it was generally recc to wrap the clothing in cotton cloth before placing it in a plastic bag, or exposing it to any other chemicals.

Maybe your freezer isn't big enough for some of that, but if you know anyone with a larger one that you could use for a week, that might work. Dry ice is easy to get. And 120F heat is not so hard, but it needs to be even so you don't hit high temps in one area. Just 30 minutes @ 120F though - I would think that warming an oven, and putting the stuff inside the turned off oven (and sticking notes on it so you don't accidentally turn it on later with clothes in there!) would do the trick, maybe a few cycles to be sure.

-ERD50
__________________
ERD50 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2014, 07:46 AM   #4
Moderator Emeritus
Bestwifeever's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 16,373
Too bad about the cashmere sweater and sport coats.

Here is an article about dealing with clothes-eating moths:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/28/ga...8fix.html?_r=0

Which says:

Quote:
Whether you have clothes-eating moths or not, though, storing clothing safely — preferably in dry, airtight containers or clothing bags — is essential. “Airtight just means moths can’t get in,” Professor Miller said. “If adult moths can’t get in, they can’t lay eggs.”

Any plastic sweater box with a tight-fitting lid (the Container Store sells them for about $5) will do the trick. For extra protection, seal the edges with packing tape. Vacuum-sealed garment bags work, too (the Stow More Garment and Travel Bags by Bongo are about $10 for a set of three on Amazon.com), and individual items can be safely stored in Ziploc bags.
__________________
Bestwifeever is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2014, 09:47 AM   #5
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 18,271
The potential trouble with that advice:

Quote:
“Airtight just means moths can’t get in,” Professor Miller said. “If adult moths can’t get in, they can’t lay eggs.”
is that the eggs may already be on the fabric. It is the larvae (not the moths) that eat the wool. So you need to get rid of eggs and larvae, which heat, cold, or CO2 or Nitrogen will do.

-ERD50
__________________
ERD50 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2014, 11:49 AM   #6
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 11,615
I've had problems with the vacuum bags leaking over long periods of time (I'll bet the air goes through the plastic at a very slow rate, just like it eventually escapes through rubber tires/inner tubes). Another issue with the vacuum bags: They result in some very stubborn wrinkles in the clothes.

I'd probably freeze the clothes for a few days, then just put them in a plastic box (with the air holes taped over--usually there are air holes). No moth is going to get into that. If you want insurance, put some blue painter's tape around the edge (it should come off easily when it is time) and maybe throw in a cedar block (give it a few wipes with sandpaper every year to refresh expose fresh wood).
__________________
"Freedom begins when you tell Mrs. Grundy to go fly a kite." - R. Heinlein
samclem is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2014, 12:11 PM   #7
Moderator Emeritus
Bestwifeever's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 16,373
Quote:
Originally Posted by ERD50 View Post
The potential trouble with that advice:



is that the eggs may already be on the fabric. It is the larvae (not the moths) that eat the wool. So you need to get rid of eggs and larvae, which heat, cold, or CO2 or Nitrogen will do.

-ERD50
Yes, and the article addresses that and more at great length. I quoted the storage paragraphs because they seemed especially pertinent to the questions in Ha's post about his storage method and so I thought he might find them helpful.
__________________
Bestwifeever is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2014, 12:18 PM   #8
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Ed_The_Gypsy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: the City of Subdued Excitement
Posts: 5,293
I would go with the dry ice, Ha. CO2 will smother anything animal and is not vulnerable to loss of vacuum seal as there is no differential pressure.
__________________

__________________
my bumpersticker:
"I am not in a hurry.
I am retired.
And I don't care how big your truck is."
Ed_The_Gypsy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Opinions on Wealth Protector Universal Life Insurance Golden sunsets FIRE and Money 28 08-11-2013 12:30 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:33 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.