Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Any experience with travertine tile?
Old 10-22-2010, 06:48 AM   #1
Full time employment: Posting here.
My Dream's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 829
Any experience with travertine tile?

I hope it spelling it right.

Came upon this tile last weekend on sale for $4.00 per sq. ft. they came in 12"'x12" and 12"x24". We really liked the fact that no two tiles were the same and came to really like the looks of the tile. I did however find the tile to be a bit brittle and could be an issue with installation as well as durability. It also looks a bit porous but the rep stated it could and should be sealed once every 1-2 years.

Any exerience with this tile?
__________________

__________________
Newbie
My Dream is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 10-22-2010, 07:05 AM   #2
Moderator Emeritus
Martha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: minnesota
Posts: 13,212
We had it in the bath and hall of a former home. It is very porous, I believe more porous than marble. In some places it was pitted, but you didn't notice unless you were down on your hands and knees cleaning. It shouldn't crack if your surface is flat and doesn't flex. We had a few cracked grout lines but no cracked tile.
__________________

__________________
.


No more lawyer stuff, no more political stuff, so no more CYA

Martha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2010, 07:15 AM   #3
Recycles dryer sheets
MissMolly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 471
We installed this in our hall and guest bath about 7 years ago. We laid cement board first and then the tile on the cement board. We have had no problems at all with cracking and we love the look of the tile. The tiles were a dream to install (compared to slate). I would not hesitate to recommend travertine.
__________________
MissMolly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2010, 01:33 PM   #4
Recycles dryer sheets
Life_is_Good's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 227
I have it in my entry way.

It seems to be brittle. We have several hair line cracks. Occasionally it gets pitted from women's heals (no... I'm not wearing them!). I've had to fill the pits so they don't enlarge.

While I like the look, I would get something more durable next time.
__________________
Life_is_Good is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2010, 01:39 PM   #5
Recycles dryer sheets
IBWino's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 423
We have it in our master bath and have had no problems. Small pits/pores get filled with grout and are not a major issue. It is much more prone to cracking than marble if it is not well supported. It's very important to verify that the floor is structurally adequate (i.e. that the floor will not move/flex significantly).
__________________
IBWino is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2010, 01:44 PM   #6
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
73ss454's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: LaLa Land
Posts: 4,378
We had it installed around our pool 2 years ago. No problems as of yet and we love many of the features. It does not get hot from the sun and it's not slippery even when wet. There is no reason to seal it as it is a natural stone. Once you start with a sealer it will have to be done at least every year. Most sealants will make it shine at bit but we like the natural look.
__________________
73ss454 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2010, 01:47 PM   #7
Recycles dryer sheets
IBWino's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 423
I think the reason for using a sealer is to prevent, or at least minimize staining.
__________________
IBWino is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2010, 01:53 PM   #8
Moderator Emeritus
Nords's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Oahu
Posts: 26,617
Quote:
Originally Posted by My Dream View Post
I did however find the tile to be a bit brittle and could be an issue with installation as well as durability.
Any exerience with this tile?
From what I've read & seen, at this size of tile the underlayment prep is the key-- for example, a couple layers of plywood underneath a cement backerboard to provide the stiffest possible surface. There are also special morters for larger tiles designed to support the larger surface area with less flex. And finally, when you lay the tile you'll probably need a thick layer of thinset (it's actually thicker than thinset but that's the noun) and back-buttering on the tile.

I have no DIY fear but for this material I'd bring in a high-end experienced pro. Otherwise I'd get to do it three times...

We were at two gorgeous open houses last weekend where the owners chose very pretty flooring. Unfortunately no one bothered to take the opportunity to beef up the infrastructure, so a kitchen slate/travertine floor felt very bouncy and a laminated-wood floor was not at all level in just about any direction. 10 years from now both homeowners will be wondering what the heck went wrong.
__________________
*
*

The book written on E-R.org, "The Military Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement", on sale now! For more info see "About Me" in my profile.
I don't spend much time here anymore, so please send me a PM. Thanks.
Nords is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2010, 06:36 PM   #9
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 18,281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nords View Post
From what I've read & seen, at this size of tile the underlayment prep is the key-- for example, a couple layers of plywood underneath a cement backerboard to provide the stiffest possible surface. There are also special morters for larger tiles designed to support the larger surface area with less flex.
Another key (at least according to the John Bridge forum guys) is in addition to a solid sub-floor and just using cement backer board, you actually set the backer board in a layer of thin-set, and screw it down while wet. The thinset fills any gaps so that the backer board doesn't rise and fall with steps, which will eventually pull through the screws, then everything is flexing.

I did our 3-season room this way. 13" tiles so I was concerned with cracking, plus it sees the winter cold (though protected, but not heated). When I asked installers about this, they said the NEVER do it that way. But I think it makes a difference, and it is what the cement board people require for their warranty. Ensure that the installer does it that way, it's extra work (I know, I did it) and most skip it.

-ERD50
__________________
ERD50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2010, 06:41 PM   #10
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
73ss454's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: LaLa Land
Posts: 4,378
For around our pool the contractor just laid it down over the dirt. No problems since it was put down 2 years ago.
__________________
73ss454 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2010, 12:54 PM   #11
Full time employment: Posting here.
My Dream's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 829
A lot of mixed reviews, thanks for all the posts everyone. Seems as though we may pass on Travertine since I'm into No maintenance. I don't mind sealing every year but it sounds as though it may not hold up. The person at the tile shop mentioned he wouldn't recomend it for high traffic areas. Although our bathroom isn't high traffic it sort of set off a red flag.

I'm glad to hear several have had good experiences with this tile since it is a beautiful tile.
__________________

__________________
Newbie
My Dream is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tile Moemg Other topics 30 03-08-2008 04:15 PM
Replacing small bathroom tile floor? joesxm3 Other topics 21 07-11-2007 12:15 AM
Tile Layout Preview Software? BigMoneyJim Other topics 2 10-28-2006 08:30 PM
Anyone own a wet saw for tile? cute fuzzy bunny Other topics 72 03-16-2006 11:15 AM
what cleans pool tile  best ? zuki Other topics 2 04-10-2005 10:04 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:32 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.