Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-01-2011, 11:20 PM   #21
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Rambler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 2,250
dm - I've always wanted to learn to fly and I had a great time a few months back when we did an exec retreat/teambuilding exercise complete with 2 hours of flying lessons (amongst other things).

My wife has been encouraging me to get my license for a long time (to be done after I ER) and she SAYS she will be happy to fly with me. Well, I would love to get my license and fly around...perhaps far enough to see the kids who will most likely be 400-800 miles away from our home. But, I know my wife, and I know that she can get a bit quesy in the car on mountain roads, never mind clear air turbulence on a hot summer day.

My meager advice to you is that if your wife says she's happy for you to get your license AND to fly with you, you may want to start with a ride, with her in the back seat, and you up front with an instructor for a "try before you buy" ride. As I said, my wife keeps insisting I should (eventually) get my license, but to me, it is too expensive of a hobby to just go fly by myself for an hour or two a week. I would need her to enjoy it with me, or I would rather spend the money on something else that we CAN enjoy together. So, when we move back to the States, this will be one of the first things we're going to do...go for a ride to see if she can stomach it.

If your bug for flying is just "for you", you may want to check out the light sport license. There are numerous aircraft available in the low $100k range if you chose to buy, such as the Skycatcher by Cessna. They are slow and small, but might work well if you aren't looking at this as a way to see the world.

R
__________________

__________________
Find Joy in the Journey...
Rambler is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 11-01-2011, 11:44 PM   #22
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 11,615
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambler View Post
My meager advice to you is that if your wife says she's happy for you to get your license AND to fly with you, you may want to start with a ride, with her in the back seat, and you up front with an instructor for a "try before you buy" ride.
Rambler,
The back seat of a light airplane can be a terrible place, especially if it's bumpy or hot. If you put her back there, you might not get a fair indication of how she'd do in the front. The front provides a better view of the outside, and that matchup between what you are seeing and what your inner ear is saying helps folks feel better.
But your idea is good. Maybe let her ride up front with the instructor, he/she will let your wife fly, and that (for me) is the best cure for any feeling of "ickiness." I've never gotten sick while flying the airplane (no matter what the weather was or how vigorous the flight maneuvers), but been sick lots of times in the back of a C-130. Low altitude turbulence, aggressive maneuvers, hot, fumes from a faulty heater valve, the sights, smells, and sounds of other nearby sufferers . . . in the back of a C-130 at low altitude is where I imagine bin Laden is spending his eternity.
__________________

__________________
"Freedom begins when you tell Mrs. Grundy to go fly a kite." - R. Heinlein
samclem is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 02:31 AM   #23
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 247
Been flying since 1988. Rented for 10 years and have been in a partnership for about 12 years. It's been a great experience and I've flown over most of the continental U.S.

A few words of wisdom:

1 - NEVER be so impatient to fly that it clouds your judgement on weather, your health at the moment, or the condition of the plane. Force yourself to never REQUIRE flying on any given day. If you ever fly somewhere, the return trip's timing is flexible. You'll spend the night in a hotel if necessary.
2 - Lessons are sometimes tough, but learning to fly is really fun. If it takes 4-6 months, those will be challenging but very fun times.
3 - Almost everybody taking lessons gets into a phase where they just can't seem to land smooth, etc. It passes. You will doubt yourself, but keep at it.
4 - I'd say you can start flying lessons concurrently with ground school, but aim to be done with ground learning and test taking well before the end of your flight training. You can use the flight training as a "reward" for the ground progress milestones.
5 - Unless you are heavy, as others have said the Cessna 152 is a great little plane. In many ways I prefer its handling to the C172 as it is more agile and has lighter controls.

Good luck and have fun, be diligent!
__________________
Surfdaddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 05:31 AM   #24
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Rambler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 2,250
Quote:
Originally Posted by samclem View Post
Rambler,
The back seat of a light airplane can be a terrible place, especially if it's bumpy or hot. If you put her back there, you might not get a fair indication of how she'd do in the front. The front provides a better view of the outside, and that matchup between what you are seeing and what your inner ear is saying helps folks feel better.
But your idea is good. Maybe let her ride up front with the instructor, he/she will let your wife fly, and that (for me) is the best cure for any feeling of "ickiness." I've never gotten sick while flying the airplane (no matter what the weather was or how vigorous the flight maneuvers), but been sick lots of times in the back of a C-130. Low altitude turbulence, aggressive maneuvers, hot, fumes from a faulty heater valve, the sights, smells, and sounds of other nearby sufferers . . . in the back of a C-130 at low altitude is where I imagine bin Laden is spending his eternity.
Good idea. Next time the topic comes up, I'll run it by her and see how she reacts.

R
__________________
Find Joy in the Journey...
Rambler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 06:26 AM   #25
Moderator
Walt34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern WV Panhandle
Posts: 16,544
It's a lot of fun but as others have said, bring your checkbook.

If you can find a school/instructor that offers tailwheel aircraft do that. I learned in a Piper J-3 but few places offer instruction in those because they are somewhat of a collector's item now. Taildraggers don't handle any differently in the air but they sure do on the ground and if you learn that from the beginning you'll be a better pilot for it. The difference is great enough that many (most?) insurance companies will exclude coverage on tailwheel aircraft if the pilot doesn't have 20+ hours in one.

Re traveling in a light aircraft with a VFR license the saying is "With time to spare, go by air". You will run into weather delays and pushing the envelope on that will get you killed faster than anything else. I once camped on an airport for four days because of weather. Yup, tent, sleeping bag, etc. Big-city airports won't let you do that but the backwoods fields might.

All that said, your solo flight is one of those experiences you will never, ever, forget. Do it.
__________________
I heard the call to do nothing. So I answered it.
Walt34 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 09:58 AM   #26
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Punta Gorda, FL
Posts: 666
Thanks everyone. The wife has actually been up in a 152. A local kid we know took her for a spin a year or two after he got out of high school. She seemed to enjoy it and didn't have any motion problems.

As I said, this is something that I have alway's wanted to do, but either didn't have the time or money. Now I do, so I start in February when I get back from vacation. I do want to be able to go an a trip now and then, but understand its weather permitting.

I talked to two different instructors at two flight school's and both said the 152 might be a little small for me and an instructor. I'm 6' and 200 lbs, and the instructors were about the same.

Prices for a block of 10 hours were, $70 for a 152, $75 for a PA-140, and $93 for a 172. Instruction is $45 per hour. The above prices may vary some with the cost of fuel.

He had some tailwheel aircraft in his hanger, but I think he is more of a collector, don't know if he rents those out or trains in them.
__________________
dm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 01:00 PM   #27
Full time employment: Posting here.
MikeD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Leesburg, VA
Posts: 805
$93 an hour! That's cheap! My wife got a bug for learning to fly a helicopter a couple of years ago! $265 an hour! She spent $5K before we knew it but had a lot of fun and learned a lot. She learned on a Robinson R22 and it took a long time to learn to hover. I prefer ground based transportation.

Mike D.
__________________
I just want to celebrate another day of livin'
I just want to celebrate another day of life

- R. Earth
MikeD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 01:30 PM   #28
Recycles dryer sheets
Avalon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by Surfdaddy View Post
1 - NEVER be so impatient to fly that it clouds your judgement on weather, your health at the moment, or the condition of the plane. Force yourself to never REQUIRE flying on any given day. If you ever fly somewhere, the return trip's timing is flexible. You'll spend the night in a hotel if necessary.
This is a very good point. I lost a good friend years back who took off into bad weather when he shouldn't have. He had a room reservation during the Oshkosh air show and was determined not to lose it. He was flying a home built aircraft called a Cavalier. The saddest part was that his 12 year old son died in the crash with him.
__________________

...open up your mind and see like me...
Avalon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 01:31 PM   #29
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
ls99's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 4,792
"....fly a helicopter a couple of years ago! $265 an hour!"

Helicopters a very complex machines.

One definition was of military helicopter: A bunch of spare parts flying in loose formation, supplied by the low bidder.
At least the American ones did not have what the Russians used to refer to as the Jesus nut holding on the rotor blades. Jesus nut, because if it came loose all the pilot could say was Jesus before crashing.

They expend nearly 3/4 of power and fuel in holding them up and about 1/4 of energy for forward/sideways or backward propulsion.

The advantage is that it can do all of those things and hover. Those feature make it very expensive and very maintenance intensive.

But there is no comparable feeling of jollies in the world to pulling up the collective, lifting off, hovering, then taking off in a right ascending spiral. Almost better than sex.

Then there is the hair raising experience of flying at about 15 Kts, in the fog and seeing hundreds of legs and hoofs about 50' higher than horizon, and realizing a herd of caribou is attached to the legs. Telling the real pilot -your stick -, Coming to a near screeching halt, then really slowly easing forward to see the rest of story.
__________________
There must be moderation in everything, including moderation.
ls99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 03:01 PM   #30
gone traveling
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Eastern PA
Posts: 3,851
Quote:
Originally Posted by ls99 View Post
One definition was of military helicopter: A bunch of spare parts flying in loose formation, supplied by the low bidder.
Heck, one of my old managers learned to drive a UH-1 (Huey) and it didn't cost him a cent.

He even became a captain (Army) without a college degree (quite unlike the AF, which I was a participant ).

Of course, that was in the "old days" when he/I were used as target practice by some folks in a certain SEA vacation paradise, that we were invited (by Uncle Sam, to meet Uncle Ho) to travel to.
__________________
rescueme is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 03:22 PM   #31
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso) Give me a forum ...
REWahoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Texas Hill Country
Posts: 42,117
I learned to fly absolutely free - heck, I even got paid to do it!

Of course I had no choice in what I flew, where I flew, when I flew, when I came home, or where I lived for several years. But the training was excellent, ongoing and fully funded by the taxpaying citizens of the US of A.
__________________
Numbers is hard

When I hit 70, it hit back

Retired in 2005 at age 58, no pension
REWahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 03:32 PM   #32
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 125
This thread makes me want to get current again. Got my private license back in 2005. Awesome experience but being young I quickly ran out of money after training.

I'll reiterate that you should plan lessons two to three times per week.

Learning to fly was very rewarding and having a license even more so. I thought it would be so cool to take friends and family up flying once I had the license but actually found it more fun to fly alone. Most passengers are inexperienced when it comes to small planes which creates the "hassle" of explaining EVERYTHING you are doing and sometimes dealing with frightened people.

I'm also an air traffic controller so if you want any insight into the other side of the scope let me know.
__________________
Money is freedom.
ATC Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 03:57 PM   #33
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
ls99's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 4,792
OK. Show of hands, how many want to join the military for free flight lessons, room and board?

I learned to fly helis while leasing them with pilots for research purposes on gummint grants and other research contracts, ie. taxpayer expense. Hundreds of hours flying, got to learn and play, no flight certificate. I just wanted initially learn enough to land the things in case the pilot had problems. The rest just evolved over about 14 years in Alaska. real bush flying.

Real joyride: Fly along a ridge line 2000' or so feet up, inside of the vortex generated by wind hitting the mountainside.

After landing sometimes clocked 30 to 40 Kts sitting there. Kind of hard to tie the main rotor blades down so it does not bang up the rotor head.

Inside vortex flying is OK in Hughes 500 and Bell Jetrangers, Sucks in UH-1H and UH-1M, the rotor diameter is too large, get real bad bouncing, forget it when trying to turn to set up for tiny landing spot, the tail rotor gets caught in wind, tend to run out of rudder control. Heh heh, full pedal and still going in the wrong direction. If the terrain is real rocky it can lead to extreme "pucker factor". Hard to get the seat cover out of one's backside.

Just to pipe in with the others, if you don't pay good attention to the weather, and truly understand its vagaries, it will kill you. Get there itis is often fatal.
__________________
There must be moderation in everything, including moderation.
ls99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 04:30 PM   #34
Moderator Emeritus
Nords's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Oahu
Posts: 26,617
Quote:
Originally Posted by rescueme View Post
Heck, one of my old managers learned to drive a UH-1 (Huey) and it didn't cost him a cent.
He even became a captain (Army) without a college degree (quite unlike the AF, which I was a participant ).
Of course, that was in the "old days" when he/I were used as target practice by some folks in a certain SEA vacation paradise, that we were invited (by Uncle Sam, to meet Uncle Ho) to travel to.
That's when they needed a new pilot every few minutes, right?

Quote:
Originally Posted by REWahoo View Post
Of course I had no choice in what I flew, where I flew, when I flew, when I came home, or where I lived for several years.
And they called you funny names, too...

Quote:
Originally Posted by ls99 View Post
OK. Show of hands, how many want to join the military for free flight lessons, room and board?
Yet you guys think submariners are nuts. Sheesh.
__________________
*
*

The book written on E-R.org, "The Military Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement", on sale now! For more info see "About Me" in my profile.
I don't spend much time here anymore, so please send me a PM. Thanks.
Nords is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 05:19 PM   #35
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
clifp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 7,450
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nords View Post

Yet you guys think submariners are nuts. Sheesh.
I don't know which group is crazier naval aviators or submariners. However, I bet watching Top Gun that almost all guys, and probably a heck of a lot girls, thought flying a jet looks like a hell of lot of fun. No doubt looking like Tom Cruise would add to the fun factor.

On the other hand I can't imagine kid watching Das Boot, and saying gee that looks like fun career. Even if people aren't trying to kill you all the time, being locked up in a steel cylinder for 90 days without seeing the sun doesn't like nearly as much fun as doing aerobatics in a F14.
__________________
clifp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 09:38 PM   #36
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
HFWR's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Lawn chair in Texas
Posts: 12,964
So you want to fly in a Navy Fighter Jet?

Quote:
Biff was to fly me in an F-14D Tomcat, a ridiculously powerful $60 million weapon with nearly as much thrust as weight, not unlike Colin Montgomerie. I was worried about getting airsick, so the night before the flight I asked Biff if there was something I should eat the next morning.
“Bananas,” he said.
“For the potassium?” I asked.
“No,” Biff said, “because they taste about the same coming up as they do going down.”
__________________
Have Funds, Will Retire

...not doing anything of true substance...
HFWR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2011, 09:48 AM   #37
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
JPatrick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 2,494
Quote:
Originally Posted by REWahoo View Post
I learned to fly absolutely free - heck, I even got paid to do it!

Of course I had no choice in what I flew, where I flew, when I flew, when I came home, or where I lived for several years. But the training was excellent, ongoing and fully funded by the taxpaying citizens of the US of A.
+1

Don't forget--Cool sunglasses for free..
__________________
JPatrick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2011, 03:44 PM   #38
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
clifp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 7,450
Quote:
Originally Posted by JPatrick View Post
+1

Don't forget--Cool sunglasses for free..
The sunglasses are free too! Now I am really jealous, if only they had Lasik surgery back in 1977 I might have had a different career.
__________________
clifp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2011, 03:45 PM   #39
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
HFWR's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Lawn chair in Texas
Posts: 12,964
Quote:
Originally Posted by clifp View Post
The sunglasses are free too! Now I am really jealous, if only they had Lasik surgery back in 1977 I might have had a different career.
Is being dead a career?
__________________
Have Funds, Will Retire

...not doing anything of true substance...
HFWR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2011, 06:22 PM   #40
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
ls99's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 4,792
For those that never spent time in a cockpit, here is a video of a fairly high performance aircraft with two very experienced pilots heading to Aspen, missing the approach due to weather, landing in Eagle.

Note that they are pretty busy even though flying with a the autopilot knob for a good while.



__________________

__________________
There must be moderation in everything, including moderation.
ls99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:14 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.