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Old 03-25-2008, 08:27 PM   #41
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Dual rated with commercial and instructors ticket.
Have not flown in years and not eager to return.
Maybe it was me, or maybe it was reality, but the BS factor associated with flying seemingly increased by 25 to 50% every year until I finally had my fill.
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Old 03-26-2008, 09:40 AM   #42
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Nor have I, all my professional flying was in the military. That's the basis for my "not as much fun" comment, since nothing I could afford to fly as a private pilot could measure up to what I was paid to fly in the military.
Keep an open mind. A single-hole Pitts is fairly inexpensive, and much more fun than any military aircraft.
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Old 03-26-2008, 09:54 AM   #43
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Keep an open mind. A single-hole Pitts is fairly inexpensive, and much more fun than any military aircraft.
Could be. For comparison, what types of military aircraft have you flown?
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Old 03-26-2008, 10:14 AM   #44
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Could be. For comparison, what types of military aircraft have you flown?
Stearman, Tiger Moth, T6. Nothing post-1945!

For comparison, what types of civil aircraft have you flown?
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Old 03-26-2008, 10:39 AM   #45
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For comparison, what types of civil aircraft have you flown?
Only the Cessna 172, everything else was military: T29, T37, T38, T39 and KC135.
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Old 03-26-2008, 11:16 AM   #46
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T-37, T-6, T-38, O-2, OV-10, F-100, F-105, T-39, F-111

Cessna 172 and 150
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Old 03-26-2008, 12:21 PM   #47
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Only the Cessna 172, everything else was military: T29, T37, T38, T39 and KC135.
Well if you're judging by Cessnas, I don't wonder that you were disappointed. You need to get out more!

I've never flown any of the military airplanes you've listed, but with the exception of the T38, they don't sound particularly fun.

You would have no difficulty pegging your fun meter with a Pitts or various other single-seat aerobatic homebuilts: most of which can be bought and sold for relatively low amounts of money.
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Old 03-26-2008, 12:27 PM   #48
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When I shopped around term life, I ended up with AIG, because flying rider was significantly cheaper than competition.
A lot of insurers don't really understand the overall risk in insuring private pilots.

Many of them just ding you for the extra risk of covering you in case of a GA-related accident. What many fail to take into account is that because of the medical requirements for renewing your pilot license, most pilots I know are much more conscious of maintaining good health than the population at large. They love to fly, and if they think they are one medical condition away from being able to fly (or having restrictions placed on them), they are more likely to take precautions to reduce their risk of developing that condition.
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Old 03-26-2008, 01:18 PM   #49
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Well if you're judging by Cessnas, I don't wonder that you were disappointed. You need to get out more!
Keep an open mind. If you haven't flown supersonic or passed gas (JP4) at 35,000 feet, you need to get out more!

All kidding and "less filling, tastes great" quibbling aside, I'm fully aware that fun is relative and not everyone finds it in the same places...or planes.
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Old 03-26-2008, 03:08 PM   #50
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Sensible.

If there is one thing that I have seen many times in aviation, it is the unconscious desire of pilots to put each other down: "You're not a real pilot unless you [insert one of the following] fly floats / fly aerobatics / fly instruments / fly helicopters / fly turbines / fly jets / fly > 25 hours a month / hold an ATPL / own your own aircraft / etc." [the list is almost endless].

There is room enough in the skies for all tastes.
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Old 03-26-2008, 03:13 PM   #51
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If there is one thing that I have seen many times in aviation, it is the unconscious desire of pilots to put each other down: "You're not a real pilot unless you [insert one of the following] fly floats / fly aerobatics / fly instruments / fly helicopters / fly turbines / fly jets / fly > 25 hours a month / hold an ATPL / own your own aircraft / etc." [the list is almost endless].

There is room enough in the skies for all tastes.
I agree with everything but the unconscious part...
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Old 03-26-2008, 03:26 PM   #52
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The most fun flying I've experienced was in an ultralight at < 100 ft. AGL. (I should note this took place over wide open wheat farming country with which I was very familiar.) Still, not the safest thing to be doing. A bit older, wiser and scareder (is that a word?) these days.
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Old 03-26-2008, 04:53 PM   #53
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I sold a gently used van to the guy who runs this business:
Twin Beech.com

I am very impressed with this movie:
http://users.skynet.be/fa926657/files/B29.wmv

That's about it for flying for me.

Mike D.
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Old 03-27-2008, 04:12 PM   #54
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I would like to share the following extract from Peter Garrison's Flying Airplanes: The First Hundred Hours (great book, btw, which has aged well since its 1980 publication):

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The part of flying that is romantic, I think, the part that makes all these people keep doing it, it not the part that is accessible to certain pilots those flying supersonic jets, bush planes, rescue helicopters, or what have you and not to others. It is the part that is accessible to all pilots: the chain of intermittent moments, the proverbial hours of boredom and the instants of terror or delight, which are imbued by their very monotony with a continuity and a wholeness that produces, eventually, the same love and yearning as one feels for a companion of many years. Only to be around airplanes, to fly them, is in itself a small but satisfactory romance. The romance is not in the planes, but in the pilots, like that romance of the road that absorbs truckers.

It can be quite boring to outsiders, this uncontrollable interest in airplanes, weather, geography, the sky, air crashes, airports; they are puzzled that, were it even in the middle of the Miss Nude America judging, the pilot would keep glancing upward, by an automatic and unconscious nervous reaction, when the drone of an airplane engine was heard overhead. Nor does the pilot himself know what he hopes to see in the passing airplane. He sees it without seeing it, as people see the time without seeing it who glance at their watches and have to glance again if you ask them, a second later, what time it is. Or as people glance at the reflection in a window; and indeed, as in the passing window, I think that what the pilot sees in the passing airplane is himself. For him all longings for escape, for mystery, for excitement and passion, for change, for youth or immortality, for disappearance, for power or for salvation, are bound up, however vainly, in that little dot that recedes obliquely in an azure sky.
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Old 03-29-2008, 03:53 PM   #55
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I flew for 20 years. I would say over 80% of my flying was VFR. In a three hour mission in the F-111 the climb out was IFR, about 5 min, then cancel and hit the deck. 2.5 hours of low level at 480K + to the bombing range, and recover IFR to base, another 5 to 10 min. As a Forward Air Controller, almost all VFR, except for those days where we practiced instruments, or actual instruments. In Germany we gave 2nd Lt.s an aircraft and told them to plan their own mission and come back two hours later. In the air to air realm, sure it is somewhat controlled, but here, take these two air craft and see which one of you can shoot down the other. There are not many civilian pilots that get to shoot rockets, strafe, drop bombs or fly formation.

I'm not knocking civilian flying. There are somethings I would like to try, Gliders, Ultra-Light float plane, Helicopter, hot air balloon to name a few. Just not willing to pay for them.
That is exactly why I took an Air Force ROTC scholarship, that stuff sounded like fun. A pity my eyesight wasn't good enough to let me by even an aircrew operating. If only Lasik was invented 30 years ago thinks may have turned out differently.

Heck flying my dad's fast, retractable manuverable homebuilt was enough to sour me on Cessnas. I got think that after flying a F-xx any civilian plane would be dull.
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Old 03-29-2008, 08:16 PM   #56
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I got think that after flying a F-xx any civilian plane would be dull.
Flying some of the T-xx types in't so bad either. This one for example (T-38 ):

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Old 03-29-2008, 09:09 PM   #57
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REW
I got to go back to Instrument Instructor School and Fly the 38 again. It was in a different environment. It war really a hoot. No pressure like flight school.
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Old 03-29-2008, 09:17 PM   #58
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You felt pressure when you were in flight school?

I look back at those days and sometimes wonder if I imagined them. No way anyone in their right mind would give me the opportunity to fly something like that or do some of the things I had got to do.

Yep, the older I get, the better I was...
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Old 03-30-2008, 09:37 AM   #59
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It didn't get much better than that--a solo T-38 contact sortie. "Here's the slickest, pointiest, highest wing-loading jet we have in the USAF. It's full of fuel. Go convert that fuel into noise, play in the pattern for awhile, and bring the plane back in 1.3 hours." But, the price was a whole lot of EP sims and chair flying before that point.
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Old 03-30-2008, 03:43 PM   #60
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It didn't get much better than ... a solo T-38 ... the slickest, pointiest, highest wing-loading jet we have in the USAF.
Not that I've ever flown one, but the F-104 triumphs on all three counts!
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