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Old 03-15-2014, 05:35 PM   #21
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Exactly your point, EastWest Gal.
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Old 03-15-2014, 06:40 PM   #22
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I hope there are lots of people out there that follow his advice! SS and Medicare can use the money! If there are not enough young people, then old f&rts working will do.
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Old 03-15-2014, 06:53 PM   #23
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It does seem to be a pretty negative article, and one that I would not expect forum members here to agree with.

But his comments on getting exercise are noteworthy. If you are retired but you are still not getting a reasonable amount of exercise, something is wrong. And if you are allowing your health to decline by not exercising when you have all this free time now that you're not working, that is just plain bad for you. Why work hard to reach FI and RE and then let your health go down hill by being sedentary when you have so much free time?
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Old 03-15-2014, 07:26 PM   #24
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Believe it or not, I know number of people around me who don't know what to do with their life without a job. They don't know what to do with their vacation days. They work 7 days a week as if that is a normal thing. Job is there life. Job defines them and without it, they will wither and die. I feel sorry for them b/c they don't know what they are missing.
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Old 03-15-2014, 09:57 PM   #25
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Believe it or not, I know number of people around me who don't know what to do with their life without a job. They don't know what to do with their vacation days. They work 7 days a week as if that is a normal thing. Job is there life. Job defines them and without it, they will wither and die. I feel sorry for them b/c they don't know what they are missing.
I agree that some people define themselves by their jobs. However, this is not synonymous with job dedication or working hard. I work 7 days a week and rarely take vacations. It is Saturday evening and I am in my office dealing with upcoming grant proposals (but obviously not at the moment ). I do not define myself by my job. When I retire, I will not look back. And I do many things outside of work, primarily outdoor and athletic activities.

Likewise, job dedication does not mean poor health, either before or after retirement. I have not missed a day of school/work due to sickness in 44 years. I just walked down the hall to measure my blood pressure on the work area machine. My BP is 116/69 and my pulse is 36. This isn't by accident. While anything can happen, I do not plan to "wither and die" once retired.

I work hard because it is my job (and appropriately compensated). But my job is not me.
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Article encouraging never retiring....
Old 03-15-2014, 10:36 PM   #26
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Article encouraging never retiring....

Somehow, I got the idea he wasn't exactly researching his topic too deeply - nor caring much about the authenticity of his conclusions. Shawn's comments about health issues make sense.

Quote:

Actually I imagine we all did, every time we clicked on it, which drove up the hits and his compensation. And indirectly he may get some clients from people reading it. So he is probably very grateful to you for posting this link.
Oh, d$*#, you're probably right. It's just something whose title popped up in my news filter, and I clicked on it to read. Reminds me of a logic paper I wrote in college some hours before it was due, called Doubting Descartes. Written completely off the top of my head, much as this one seems to be.
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Old 03-16-2014, 10:51 AM   #27
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There are a surprising amount of why you should never retire articles out there these days. I think some originate from the investment industry. With boomers retiring largely without pensions, that means cashing in stocks and stock funds, which means less money in 401Ks to siphon off in recurring management fees.
These articles have been coming out regularly ever since I started reading this forum - and that's been a long while!

They are usually written by a) someone still working or b) by someone in the financial industry (also still working). Sometimes they are written by someone really young who can't even imagine what it might be like several decades into a career.

Most articles are just filler for web sits/magazines. Especially these days when anyone can publish on the Internet and research is blown off most of the time. Just looking for clicks=revenue. Grabby headline, useless content.
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Old 03-16-2014, 10:57 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by Ready View Post
It does seem to be a pretty negative article, and one that I would not expect forum members here to agree with.

But his comments on getting exercise are noteworthy. If you are retired but you are still not getting a reasonable amount of exercise, something is wrong. And if you are allowing your health to decline by not exercising when you have all this free time now that you're not working, that is just plain bad for you. Why work hard to reach FI and RE and then let your health go down hill by being sedentary when you have so much free time?
What about all the people not getting enough exercise because they are working too hard, not to mention the health effects of job stress? Lots of modern office jobs are sedentary. That aspect often seems to be ignored in these articles. Lots of people on this forum have reported significant health improvements once they retired.
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Old 03-16-2014, 04:19 PM   #29
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What about all the people not getting enough exercise because they are working too hard, not to mention the health effects of job stress? Lots of modern office jobs are sedentary. That aspect often seems to be ignored in these articles. Lots of people on this forum have reported significant health improvements once they retired.
Right on!
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Old 03-16-2014, 07:39 PM   #30
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Just spent the weekend camping off the western shore of Everglades with old friend used to work with; we were blessed with absolutely great weather, almost no insects. He's started a new job (same career path). Other four guys, one was retired. After hearing him regale me with all the personnel issues, all the political issues, and talking to the other retiree (he was smiling) I realized, ONCE AGAIN, I could never, ever go back. Rather eat cat food. I'll take my occasional spat of "boredom" any day for the stress and lack of ability to get outside whenever I want.

Not sure about him but I'll live longer this way. Freedom. It's a wonderful thing.
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Article encouraging never retiring....
Old 03-16-2014, 10:08 PM   #31
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Article encouraging never retiring....

We've been spending more time hiking, canoeing and enjoying outdoor activities: no problems with exercise or boredom, for sure.

Unfortunately, I also have more time to cook and eat. Gained a few pounds....
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Old 03-17-2014, 12:49 AM   #32
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I agree with the other comments about being skeptical of the negative effect on life expectancy often found in these studies of early retirees given the confounding factors. Nevertheless, even if you take them at face value, as I recall, they tend to show that for those 10 extra years of working you might- on average- live one year longer. One more year in my old age in exchange for freedom for 10 extra years of my healthier, younger self? Thanks, Now I really don't care if your stats are as bogus as I think they are...
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Old 03-17-2014, 07:34 PM   #33
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I agree with the other comments about being skeptical of the negative effect on life expectancy often found in these studies of early retirees given the confounding factors. Nevertheless, even if you take them at face value, as I recall, they tend to show that for those 10 extra years of working you might- on average- live one year longer. One more year in my old age in exchange for freedom for 10 extra years of my healthier, younger self? Thanks, Now I really don't care if your stats are as bogus as I think they are...
Sounds like a bargain to me.
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Old 03-17-2014, 07:47 PM   #34
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I've read about studies that show the longer you work, your life expectancy goes down. Wish I could remember where I read it.
I recall seeing a study of Boeing retirees of that nature on another site

Here are couple of references to it.

RETIRE FUND: The Boeing Aircraft Company study showed that, early retirement could add 16 years to your life!

Ephrem:
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Old 03-18-2014, 08:41 AM   #35
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I recall seeing a study of Boeing retirees of that nature on another site

Here are couple of references to it.

RETIRE FUND: The Boeing Aircraft Company study showed that, early retirement could add 16 years to your life!

Ephrem:
Thanks for that link... Am doing a 'quote' for those who may have missed it.

Quote:
Now let's list some tidbits (besides the obvious health benefits) that may help you make the decision to retire early:


1. In 1999 dollars, the average child will take approx $100,000 to raise.(when will your nest be empty)
2. The cost of raising a medium-size dog to the age of eleven: $6,400
3. The cost of smoking a pack a day, for 25 years: $100,375 (why not invest it)
4. If you live in Canada, you can receive the CPP at age 60 instead of 65.(Heres the strategy: take a small fund, turn it into a RIF and pay yourself the equivalent of your CPP until it actually kicks in at age 60 - One of your "multiple streams of income")
5. Couples: Instead of having "two" life insurance policies, you can now buy a "first to die" policy, thus reducing your overall cost.
6. Workers, on average, (who don't brown bag it) spend $75 to $100 on lunch and coffee, every week.($3650.oo per year)
7. In Canada, you can now split pension income with your spouse, thereby reducing your overall tax burden.
8. On average, people spend $6 per day on lottery tickets. ($2190 yr)
9. Grocery shopping on Wednesday (as opposed to Saturday) can save you as much as 20%, as well as the aggravation of lineups.
10. Only one car is often needed for a retired couple.
11. You won't be commuting, everyday, during rush hour.You avoid the stress and you save up to $10,000 per year usually spent on the commute vehicle.
12. People 55 and over get reduced rates on Cruise and other vacations . (I will show you in a later Blog how to get those vacations for as much as 50-70% off.)
If you feel you "have to have a place to go" when you retire, then volunteer. Volunteering gives you a sense of giving back, and adds to your overall sense of well being and good health.
Don't fall into the trap of thinking you will have to work forever. Retirement living is a lot less expensive than living in the rat race, and living 16 years longer certainly appeals to me. How about you?
Lots of "meat" there...
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Old 03-18-2014, 08:43 AM   #36
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I recall seeing a study of Boeing retirees of that nature on another site

Here are couple of references to it.

RETIRE FUND: The Boeing Aircraft Company study showed that, early retirement could add 16 years to your life!

Ephrem:
Too bad it was debunked at least 10 years ago, and it's been reviewed here before. Anyone can find something to support any POV on the internet...

http://www.boeing.com/companyoffices...nars/Rumor.pdf

Quote:
An incorrect, but alarming, chart that claims to show the life expectancy of Boeing retirees has been circulating on the Internet. According to this chart, Boeing employees who retire at 65 die much sooner than employees who retire at earlier ages. Even though this chart has been in existence for over twenty years, it is not based on fact. There is no correlation between age at retirement and life expectancy of Boeing retirees.

The first inaccurate life expectancy chart surfaced in the early 80s, and versions of it have been floating around for years – almost as an “urban myth.” The Internet now spreads the misinformation farther, faster, and in a more professional-appearing form. Boeing and many other companies have tried to dispel the misconception. Unfortunately, the bad news – even though it is fiction – catches people’s attention, while the good news (that Boeing employees generally live longer than the national average), is accurate but often overlooked.
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Old 03-18-2014, 09:01 AM   #37
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Too bad it was debunked at least 10 years ago, and it's been reviewed here before. Anyone can find something to support any POV on the internet...

http://www.boeing.com/companyoffices...nars/Rumor.pdf
I didn't mean for it to be taken as fact. I was just answering David61s question as to where he might have seen such a study.
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