Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Astronomy and star cycles
Old 05-01-2017, 09:58 AM   #1
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Lsbcal's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: west coast, hi there!
Posts: 6,644
Astronomy and star cycles

One of our posters (JoeDreaming) suggested this excellant NASA site, Astronomy Picture of the Day . I really liked that idea of just checking it out occasionally or daily. Then I got more interested in understanding the star life cycles. Periodically I rekindle that interest. I found some useful study material below.

1) This site goes into quite a bit of detail. One can take quite a bit of time studying this (there's no hurry ). Also the lower link goes to the site home page: Life and Death of Stars

2) This site contains detailed lectures on astronomy (see Lectures link). It also has a link to a Cosmology lecture series (AST 123). Astronomy (U of Oregon undergrad courses)

3) This site is a good encyclopedia site for some astronomy topics: Cosmos

4) And there is always good stuff on Wikipedia. This link has a nice periodic table showing where all the elements of our Earth come from: nucleosynthesis



Feel free to add your favorite astronomy sites. There was a thread on astronomy awhile back but I don't have the link.
__________________

Lsbcal is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 05-06-2017, 02:29 PM   #2
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Lsbcal's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: west coast, hi there!
Posts: 6,644
Well just in case there is anyone here interested in this tech stuff, here is a lecture series I came across today from Max Pettini at Cambridge Univ.
lectures on the structure and evolution of stars

It is fairly technical and probably is used at the undergraduate level at Cambridge. The nice thing is that these PDF's can be easily saved for reference. Lots of math.
__________________

Lsbcal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2017, 02:54 PM   #3
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Alberta/Ontario/ Arizona
Posts: 3,393
I've always been interested in Astronomy and thought I would get more into it in retirement. Alas, hasn't happened.
Danmar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2017, 03:32 PM   #4
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Lsbcal's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: west coast, hi there!
Posts: 6,644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danmar View Post
I've always been interested in Astronomy and thought I would get more into it in retirement. Alas, hasn't happened.
That astronomy picture of the day site above is a light way to get interested.
Lsbcal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2017, 03:56 PM   #5
Full time employment: Posting here.
USGrant1962's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: DC area
Posts: 967
Not a website, but as a teenager I loved Burnham's Celestial Handbook.

APOD is a great site.
__________________
FI and Semi-ER March 24, 2017
Consulting to stay engaged

"All models are wrong, some are useful." - George Box
USGrant1962 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2017, 05:07 PM   #6
Full time employment: Posting here.
jjquantz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 926
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lsbcal View Post
Well just in case there is anyone here interested in this tech stuff, here is a lecture series I came across today from Max Pettini at Cambridge Univ.
lectures on the structure and evolution of stars

It is fairly technical and probably is used at the undergraduate level at Cambridge. The nice thing is that these PDF's can be easily saved for reference. Lots of math.
Thanks for the link. A quick glance at the notes takes me back 37+ years to my Intro to Stellar Evolution Class at university. I might have to spend some more time on them. I think that I still have my old textbook - it would be interesting to compare.
jjquantz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2017, 05:37 AM   #7
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,441
You should check out this really nice program:

Stellarium

"Stellarium is a free open source planetarium for your computer. It shows a realistic sky in 3D, just like what you see with the naked eye, binoculars or a telescope."
jim584672 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2017, 07:28 AM   #8
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 1,147
Quote:
Originally Posted by jim584672 View Post
You should check out this really nice program:

Stellarium

"Stellarium is a free open source planetarium for your computer. It shows a realistic sky in 3D, just like what you see with the naked eye, binoculars or a telescope."
Thanks! I went to download this, and remembered I already had a folder to downloading astronomy programs into. Apparently it's been a while. Some file time stamps date back to 1989!

Anyone remember Dance of the Planets? Astrolab? Skyglobe? Geoclock?

Some are DOS programs, others for Windows (probably version 3.1.) I wonder if any of them would still run.
CaptTom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2017, 08:01 AM   #9
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Alberta/Ontario/ Arizona
Posts: 3,393
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lsbcal View Post
That astronomy picture of the day site above is a light way to get interested.
Right. I also have Nightsky on my IPad and look at it from time to time. Sometimes use high powered binoculars to pick out the moons of Jupiter, Mars, or the rings of Saturn. I always though I would get a nice telescope and really get into it, but realized I probably would lose interest in short order.
Danmar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2017, 09:30 AM   #10
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,189
Have always been into astronomy. Of course growing up with the space program likely helped very much. Have dragged my little 4" scope all over the world and like Danmar always figured that I would get a 8" or 10' version one day but as I don't think that I would get into astrophotography in a big way and such incredible images are available from Hubble and other sources I don't think it is worth it for me. I still manage to read Sky & Telescope, Astronomy and SkyNews most months so figure that I am doing ok. And with apps like Night Sky and Sky Chart it's easy to get the kids interested. We are lucky to have a cottage in a dark sky preserve so the children grew up knowing how incredible the night sky can really look.
__________________

6miths is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Astronomy confusion veremchuka Other topics 20 07-16-2013 09:42 AM
40 year & 80 year Market Cycles dex FIRE and Money 16 04-06-2010 04:35 PM
Market Cycles and Safe Withdrawal Rates walkinwood FIRE and Money 5 09-18-2009 06:18 AM
Retiring In Secular Cycles Tadpole FIRE and Money 138 02-21-2007 10:38 PM
stock market cycles-for your education dex FIRE and Money 2 02-21-2005 07:00 PM

» Quick Links

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:59 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×