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Old 04-04-2013, 08:09 PM   #21
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you should at least give the dog a chance and check for the stones. surgery would be required but you can decide at that point. the stones cause uncontrollable urges and are not the dog's fault.
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Old 04-04-2013, 10:20 PM   #22
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There are actually some good drugs for dementia in dogs so you may be able to help with that as well. I'm so glad you are going to get her to the vet! I've been worried about y'all all day!
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Old 04-05-2013, 05:26 AM   #23
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My thoughts exactly.
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Originally Posted by sheehs1 View Post
I'd take her to the vet for some blood work if you have not already done so. Frequent urination is a sign of diabetes. Is she thirsty also?

Her kidneys could be failing. There are many reasons for this and without blood work, it's hard to know what is going on.
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Old 04-05-2013, 05:40 AM   #24
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There are actually some good drugs for dementia in dogs so you may be able to help with that as well. I'm so glad you are going to get her to the vet! I've been worried about y'all all day!
Really? Didn't think there was a cure even in humans.
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Old 04-05-2013, 09:42 AM   #25
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Really? Didn't think there was a cure even in humans.
Not a cure -- treatment. See Selegiline - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
and Anipryl® - Help for senior dogs and cats with dementia or cognitive dysfunction?:
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Anipryl® is the veterinary trade name for a drug called selegiline hydrochloride, also known as L-deprenyl. It is used in humans for treatment of Parkinson's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, and Cushing's Disease. The drug is approved by the FDA for use in dogs for treatment of Pituitary Dependent Hyperadrenocorticism (PDH) also known as Cushing's Disease and Canine Cognitive Dysfunction.
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Old 04-05-2013, 05:42 PM   #26
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Time for the veterinarian to put in her two cents! A 15 year old dog with sudden loss of house training could be a number of things. Often it is due to an increase in water consumption due to diseases such as kidney failure, liver failure, diabetes, thyroid disease, Cushings disease, bladder stones, bladder cancer or urinary tract infections. It could also be behavioral. Changes in environment can really confuse an older dog. At the minimum baseline Bloodwork +/- radiographs should be done. Don't get too excited about the cognitive dysfunction supplements (Anipryl), they do not reverse the disease, only help slow the progression. In advanced age it's hard to get a good response.
Good luck!
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Old 04-05-2013, 10:04 PM   #27
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I had her to the vet today. She took x-rays, but didn't see any signs of stones. She drew blood for some blood work tests and took urine sample.
Because of her sudden increase in drinking water and increased appetite, plus an extended belly, she thinks she has Cushings Desease.

If tests from today indicate Cushings than I have to take her back for further tests on Monday. I have to call her tomorrow to find out. I don't know anything about Cushings desease in dogs. I am going to spend some time on internet now reading up on it.

She did say something that contradicts what other say on this thread have said, and what I read the other night on line from other dog forums. She said incontinence occurs while they sleep. The urine gradually seeps out while sleeping. She said if she is squatting to go to the bathroom while she is up, that is not incontinence.
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Old 04-06-2013, 05:48 AM   #28
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She did say something that contradicts what other say on this thread have said, and what I read the other night on line from other dog forums. She said incontinence occurs while they sleep. The urine gradually seeps out while sleeping. She said if she is squatting to go to the bathroom while she is up, that is not incontinence.
We have an older dog (12 now) that had incontinence issue while sleeping a few times with no real pattern as to when it would happen. A small amount of urine seeping out while she was asleep is exactly how we would describe it. She now takes a small dosage of medication called Proin and hasn't had an issue for a couple of years. There is a Yahoo Group called CanineCushings-AutoimmuneCare that has some useful information related to Cushings for animals. Through our foster care for Shelties, we've run across this a few times and had an older foster in house for about a year that had this- with treatments, it stayed under control.

Good luck and good news that you're working with the vet. Didn't read all the posts but hope you get some relief soon.
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Old 04-06-2013, 10:11 AM   #29
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If tests from today indicate Cushings than I have to take her back for further tests on Monday. I have to call her tomorrow to find out. I don't know anything about Cushings desease in dogs. I am going to spend some time on internet now reading up on it.
If the vet confirms she has Cushings Disease, the Yahoo Group CanineCushings-AutoimmuneCare : Cushing's Syndrome | Autoimmune Disease can be immensely helpful. My dog has Cushings Disease, and this group provides great information from knowledgeable veterinary sources that can help you understand your dog's problem and how to help her live with it.

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She did say something that contradicts what other say on this thread have said, and what I read the other night on line from other dog forums. She said incontinence occurs while they sleep. The urine gradually seeps out while sleeping. She said if she is squatting to go to the bathroom while she is up, that is not incontinence.
Some dog's have urine that is diluted. When the consistency is diluted they can 'leak' during their sleep -- or even just walking around. If your dog is drinking more than the normal amount of water for her size, then she will have dilute urine.

The results of the blood and urine tests will help the vet diagnose what the issue is and recommend a treatment plan.

-- Rita (and Poppi)
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