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View Poll Results: Do you prefer bare or enameled cast iron cookware?
Bare all the way baby! 30 76.92%
I prefer to cover up with enamel. 4 10.26%
I don't do iron. 5 12.82%
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Old 11-01-2009, 08:58 PM   #41
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Its not so much as non stick. Its cast iron holds heat so much better than anything else. So you can fry foods that much better. Ive never cooked anything in cast iron that did not have fat added to it.

Now, Im sure we have some folks here who have more experience than me in using cast iron. Might correct me.

Oh and the bacon thing above...:Groan:
Let me guess, you use cast iron for quiche?
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Old 11-01-2009, 09:00 PM   #42
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The only issue I am aware of is that they can't be used on glass cook tops.
I have a glass cooktop and I still used iron. You have to be sure to use a flat bottom pan, some have a little ridge that would interfere with contact.
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Old 11-01-2009, 09:03 PM   #43
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Let me guess, you use cast iron for quiche?
Nah anything fried like chicken fried steak,fish or chicken. Unless I got the deep fryer out

Hey I made a nice quiche a month ago. Want the recipe?
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Old 11-01-2009, 09:10 PM   #44
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Nah anything fried like chicken fried steak,fish or chicken. Unless I got the deep fryer out

Hey I made a nice quiche a month ago. Want the recipe?
Yeah, thanks, that would be nice. I'm visiting Boston tomorrow and a couple of friends there love quiche so a nice recipe for quiche might be just the ticket.

BTW, I would just caution those of you with glass cook tops to be a bit shy of a brand new cast iron skillet, those burrs can scratch if you move the skillet around while in contact with the surface.
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Old 11-01-2009, 11:19 PM   #45
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I like about 1/4" of bacon fat in the skillet and the bacon brown and making some foam and bout that time drop an egg on the skillet from about 2 inches and let the yellow just slightly burst and watch the egg sizzle and bubble and form that little crispy ring around the edge. All the while washing the hot fat over the top and getting a perfect sunny side up.
Ooooooh, Yeah!!! Had just that yesterday morning for breakfast...'cept for the "slightly burst" yoke, I like my yoke intact!

Eh, and I missed out on my fried chicken this past week too, darn it. Had too many things going on, and just plain forgot about it! However, I did go down to the little grease-pit restaurant Friday night and got a bunch of fried turtle and french fries!!!
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Old 11-02-2009, 06:45 AM   #46
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I'll second (or more) the use of silicone scrapers to cook with. I keep 4 going all the time as the ones I bought are able to go to a high temp before melting (and they'll never get that hot at my house).
Kohl's often has 30% off or so on Kitchenaid utensils, and they seem to work better than most. Quite strong and well made I found.
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Old 11-02-2009, 08:08 AM   #47
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I clean them with a simple rinse of water and wipe with a cloth.
I've read this elsewhere, but haven't understood it completely.

For example, if you fry fish or something that sticks to the pan, do you still just use water?

I hand wash using dish soap and try not to scrub off the coating that's built up on the pan.

Any advice or tips?
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Old 11-02-2009, 08:18 AM   #48
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For example, if you fry fish or something that sticks to the pan, do you still just use water?

I hand wash using dish soap and try not to scrub off the coating that's built up on the pan.
The problem with soap is that it removes the oil from the coating and that is the "non-stick" element of greatest importance. Once that happens, you have to go through the "seasoning" process again.

I know what you are concerned about -- sanitation. That is overcome by putting it back on the stove over high heat until all the water (moisture) has evaporated. (I do this with all pots and pans not just the cast iron ones.)

And now that I think of it -- the above is required of Cast Iron in any event -- Rust is the enemy.
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Old 11-02-2009, 09:41 AM   #49
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I own exactly 1 bare cast iron fry pan, given to me by my Mom in 1976 when I went to college. I believe it was bought in PA Dutch country on a family vacation in the 1960s. I use it for very rare frying in oil (3x a year at best).

I own exactly 1 Silverstone coated fry pan, used for omelettes only.

The rest of my cookware is 1984 vintage stainless steel Revereware with real copper clad bottoms. I bought a full set for practically nothing (compared to today's price) at an outlet store in Rome NY (roadtrip!) back when I was a newlywed and they were still manufacturing it there. The thickness of the steel is much greater than anything I've seen lately.

I use this set daily. It seems to be indestructible.
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Old 11-02-2009, 09:42 AM   #50
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Let me guess, you use cast iron for quiche?
Well - for a frittata, which is almost a crustless quiche. I love my Le Creuset omelet pan for this.

It has this amazing glass finish that is not "non-stick" but behaves like non-stick.

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Old 11-02-2009, 11:43 AM   #51
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The rest of my cookware is 1984 vintage stainless steel Revereware with real copper clad bottoms. I bought a full set for practically nothing (compared to today's price) at an outlet store in Rome NY (roadtrip!) back when I was a newlywed and they were still manufacturing it there. The thickness of the steel is much greater than anything I've seen lately.

I use this set daily. It seems to be indestructible.
I am so envious! Back in the early 1970's my mother gave me two Revereware saucepans with lids, which she probably bought in the 1960's. I still have one - - the other went to my ex when we divorced. I have looked and looked for pans that I might like as much as these. I think the quality of older Revereware like that is terrific, and the handles on mine won't burn your hand. I use that pan and lid more often than any other cookware that I own.
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Old 11-02-2009, 02:13 PM   #52
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Old 11-02-2009, 02:29 PM   #53
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I am so envious! Back in the early 1970's my mother gave me two Revereware saucepans with lids, which she probably bought in the 1960's. I still have one - - the other went to my ex when we divorced. I have looked and looked for pans that I might like as much as these. I think the quality of older Revereware like that is terrific, and the handles on mine won't burn your hand. I use that pan and lid more often than any other cookware that I own.
Well, if I ever run across any older pots in a garage sale, I'll snag some for you. It's so common here even after all these years. People have no clue how nice it is.

Now I'm really going to turn you green with envy.
A few years later I sprang for a full set of Oneida Limited silverware with real silverplate. And where did I get this stuff? The outlet store in Oneida NY. It was a discontinued floral edge pattern that I picked up for peanuts.

You just can't get good real metal stuff like this anymore without breaking the bank.
The Oneida NY plant closed years ago.
Oneida Limited - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Is Oneida silverware a local thing or have others heard of it?
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Old 11-02-2009, 02:46 PM   #54
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Freebird, I have heard of it though I just use cheap stainless steel myself (so that I don't feel badly if I accidently throw one in the trash or whatever; plus in a pinch I have been known to use a knife as a screwdriver, a forks are handy for various non-standard purposes as well). I'll bet it is absolutely beautiful, though, and getting it for a bargain price is phenomenal! Best of both worlds.
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Old 11-02-2009, 02:49 PM   #55
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Well, if I ever run across any older pots in a garage sale, I'll snag some for you. It's so common here even after all these years. People have no clue how nice it is.

Now I'm really going to turn you green with envy.
A few years later I sprang for a full set of Oneida Limited silverware with real silverplate. And where did I get this stuff? The outlet store in Oneida NY. It was a discontinued floral edge pattern that I picked up for peanuts.

You just can't get good real metal stuff like this anymore without breaking the bank.
The Oneida NY plant closed years ago.
Oneida Limited - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Is Oneida silverware a local thing or have others heard of it?
Is that the same Oneida that made the stainless steel or silverplate flatware you could get with Betty Crocker coupons? I have 6 place settings of the "Brahms" pattern in stainless steel but IIRC some of the serving pieces came in silver or gold plate as well.

I just looked and there is still an Oneieda website which appears to be active. I guess they have moved their manufacturing to you-know-where.
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Old 11-02-2009, 02:53 PM   #56
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I am so envious! Back in the early 1970's my mother gave me two Revereware saucepans with lids, which she probably bought in the 1960's. I still have one - - the other went to my ex when we divorced. I have looked and looked for pans that I might like as much as these. I think the quality of older Revereware like that is terrific, and the handles on mine won't burn your hand. I use that pan and lid more often than any other cookware that I own.
I think Revereware is great too. The abovementioned stainless steel pans are all RW, and my parents still have the ones they used every day when us kids were growing up. I often see Revereware in thrift stores.
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Old 11-02-2009, 03:36 PM   #57
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Rather than nonstick "teflon", I have better luck sauteing with a little butter in classic Farberware (the pans have "a thick aluminum core coated by a durable stainless steel cap"--the copper in the Revereware probably heats more evenly, but same concept). I just replaced our only two nonstick pans with the Farberware equivalent when I realized how much of that teflon/silverstone/whatever coating we've eaten over the years.

I have a newish Lodge cast iron skillet. Everything sticks to it no matter what I do and it just seems dirty all the time. I think I have to work on renewing the seasoned surface.
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Old 11-02-2009, 04:53 PM   #58
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I've read this elsewhere, but haven't understood it completely.

For example, if you fry fish or something that sticks to the pan, do you still just use water?

I hand wash using dish soap and try not to scrub off the coating that's built up on the pan.

Any advice or tips?
Food really doesn't stick to a properly seasoned CI pan. I have a Cast Iron skillet that was purchased "raw" or unseasoned. I seasoned it as previously described (i.e., heated in a 300 degree oven, coated with a good quality vegetable oil, heated again then wiped out.)

Every time I use the pan, I wipe it out with a well-wrung out paper towel or old kitchen towel. If the pan is very dirty, I do use a small amount of dish soap and a quick rinse...never soak a CI pan and if you must scrub it, use one of those nylon mesh scrubbies but do not scrub all the way down to the bare metal! Dry the pan thoroughly and add about 1 tablespoon or so of good vegetable oil (I use canola); wipe the pan with a paper towel or napkin to remove all but a thin film of oil on the pan. I store my CI in my oven and even if I'm not using it, I allow it to heat up when I'm pre-heating the oven. It's perfectly seasoned now.
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Old 11-02-2009, 06:10 PM   #59
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Two other good ways to season cast iron:

1) cook half a pound of bacon every day for a week or so. Then use as required.

2) Deep fry your dinner in them several times. Tempura anyone? Deep fried chicken?

Might raise your blood lipids for a few days, but you will have nicely seasoned CI.

R
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Old 11-02-2009, 06:12 PM   #60
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Two other good ways to season cast iron:

1) cook half a pound of bacon every day for a week or so. Then use as required.

2) Deep fry your dinner in them several times. Tempura anyone? Deep fried chicken?

Might raise your blood lipids for a few days, but you will have nicely seasoned CI.

R
This is how many cooks keep their griddles seasoned.
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