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Old 07-05-2007, 07:31 PM   #21
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Is there any way to transfer CCD to ants?
-Leiningen
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Old 07-05-2007, 09:20 PM   #22
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Interesting. Hadn't heard of this. No dead bees around the hive, they just up and move one day.

Sounds like there is something very specific to which they have developed an adverse reaction. I bet they are all out partying it up in the woods or something, in line with SoonToRetire's suggestion.

Be interesting to find out what it turns out to be.
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Old 07-05-2007, 11:32 PM   #23
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Interesting. Hadn't heard of this. No dead bees around the hive, they just up and move one day.

Sounds like there is something very specific to which they have developed an adverse reaction. I bet they are all out partying it up in the woods or something, in line with SoonToRetire's suggestion. ...
That is what has everyone stumped. No bee bodies!

It is not like you can attach something to those wee wings and follow their flights.

Wasps are attracted to protein, bees to flowering plants.
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Old 07-06-2007, 12:33 AM   #24
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NEWS FLASH! Scientists are pursuing potential cause of CCD in bee colonies. It seems that word has slipped out about FIRE from the early-retirement.org and many bees are discovering RE. Having had an exposure to the Fire Calculator, they are discovering that they have enough put away in m-honey, that they are now able to RE and leave for other pursuits.... (more news to follow)
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Old 07-06-2007, 06:22 AM   #25
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No bee bodies!

Catchy.

Al, can you set that to music?

No bee bodies, no be bodies, NO be bodies...
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Old 07-06-2007, 07:21 AM   #26
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This blog has a lot of good information and speculation about CCD, especially in the responses.

Bee Colony Collapse Disorder - Where is it Heading? » Celsias
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Old 07-06-2007, 09:51 AM   #27
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This blog has a lot of good information and speculation about CCD, especially in the responses.

Bee Colony Collapse Disorder - Where is it Heading? » Celsias
I came a way with a very different impression (I do agree with 'speculation'). The responses are largely alarmist, knee-jerk reactions with no scientific basis. We might as well blame the iPod nano - it was shipped in large numbers at about the same time this disorder was increasing.

Here's the scariest part, IMO (I edited the name, 'who' is not the issue):

Quote:
“<insert presidential candidate here> got interested in this in the last week or so,” said David Hackenberg, the beekeeper leading the drive to publicise their plight.
“And <insert presidential candidate here>'s not alone,” he said. “There’s a lot of Congressmen have called…wanting to know what’s going on. It’s serious.
They want politicians to fix this??!! What are their qualifications? What percentage are biologists? Geez, isn't there an agricultural or bee-keepers' industry association that should research this?

I think you will find more balance at wiki:

Colony Collapse Disorder - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

esp the notes on GM crops. Yes, some theoretical possibilities regarding Bt in the pollen, but in reality, no connection can be seen.

Quote:
The vast majority of the colonies reported to be dying from CCD occur in locations where GM corn is not grown (at least in the United States; also, 5 of the 10 states with the greatest amount of corn production (including GM corn) - Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska - have had no reported cases of CCD
I bet that most of the anti-GM people are very anti-pesticide also. GM crops generally reduce the amount of pesticides required, so be careful what you wish for. Reminds me of the anti-nuke sentiment which resulted in more coal plants being built. Some 'win'.

-ERD50
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Old 07-06-2007, 10:15 AM   #28
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esp the notes on GM crops. Yes, some theoretical possibilities regarding Bt in the pollen, but in reality, no connection can be seen.

The US has grown GM foods for more than 40 years, so I don't think that's the cause..........
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Old 07-06-2007, 10:25 AM   #29
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I came a way with a very different impression (I do agree with 'speculation'). The responses are largely alarmist, knee-jerk reactions with no scientific basis. We might as well blame the iPod nano - it was shipped in large numbers at about the same time this disorder was increasing.
Mmm... interesting thought, let's add that to the list of possible causes.


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I bet that most of the anti-GM people are very anti-pesticide also.
-ERD50
Come on, that's a generality. I don't care for their cars, but I don't mind pesticide.
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Old 07-06-2007, 10:44 AM   #30
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Come on, that's a generality. I don't care for their cars, but I don't mind pesticide.
There's an anti-GM pesticide, and it comes in 3 brands:

Toyota, Honda, and Hyundai

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Old 07-19-2007, 08:47 PM   #31
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Possible cause:

Asian Parasite Killing Western Bees - Scientist

http://www.planetark.com/dailynewsstory.cfm/newsid/43163/story.htm
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Old 07-19-2007, 08:48 PM   #32
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Planet Ark : Asian Parasite Killing Western Bees - Scientist

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Old 07-20-2007, 07:43 AM   #33
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Possible cause:

Asian Parasite Killing Western Bees - Scientist

http://www.planetark.com/dailynewsst...3163/story.htm
Probably from China...they're killing us with their food and toothpaste, they're killing our pets with melamine additives, and now their killing our bees with their parasites.

Lets buy more stuff from them!
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Old 07-20-2007, 09:42 AM   #34
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Probably from China...they're killing us with their food and toothpaste, they're killing our pets with melamine additives, and now their killing our bees with their parasites.

Lets buy more stuff from them!
At least, if this is the problem, there is a cheap treatment:

"Treatment for nosema ceranae is effective and cheap -- 1 euro (US$1.4) a hive twice a year -- but beekeepers first have to be convinced the parasite is the problem."

Of course, that's too cheap and easy for any US manufacturer to produce. They'll have to increase the price by a couple of orders of magnitude before it becomes profitable to make. Then we won't be able to pay US workers to make it, so we'll have to buy it from China cheap.
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Old 07-20-2007, 11:18 AM   #35
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Not to mention all of the US AG Dept and individual State agency approvals and testing that will be required before any treatment can be done. Most of the bees will be done in by then. But the burecrats wil have justified their existance
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a macro view rather than under the microscope!
Old 08-14-2007, 04:13 PM   #36
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a macro view rather than under the microscope!

I caught this article while i was visiting up north, looks like the bees need a union - overworked and poor diet - high fructose corn syrup for bees? sheesh that stuff is really everywhere!

here is the full link
East Bay - News - Are Bees Too Busy?


i pasted the first page below...

Are Bees Too Busy?

Could factory bee farming be behind the sudden decline in US populations?

By Susan Kuchinskas

Published: August 1, 2007
All across America, a mysterious disease is wiping out bee colonies. This malady causes all the bees in a hive to seemingly vanish overnight, abandoning their brood in the nursery, as well as their stores of honey and pollen. Other bees and pests, which normally plunder deserted honey, shun these hives. This baffling die-off dealt a financial blow to commercial beekeepers this season and raised fears of environmental and economic disaster. For farmers, no bees means no pollination.
  • Jamie Soja

    Leah Fortin's rooftop hive.

  • Jamie Soja

    Fortin and Peter Scholz retrieve a swarm.
Subject(s): apiculture, Colony Collapse Disorder, varroa mite, honeybees, beekeeping, bees




But pollination is happening like mad in Leah Fortin's tiny North Oakland yard. Busy little bee bodies cover the clumps of lavender, salvia, and roses that line her driveway. More bees work the malaleucas on the parking strip, those trees with shaggy bark that look like giant Q-tips when they're in bloom.
A lot of these bees — although surely not all — come from the hive on Fortin's roof. The unobtrusive wooden box, barely twenty inches by sixteen, and thirteen inches high, sits on the tar-and-gravel roof of her stucco bungalow, sheltered by the chimney. Honeybees bustle in and out of the narrow slit along the bottom, delivering bundles of pollen and droplets of nectar, then hurrying out again for more.
"The neighbors call us 'The Little House on the Prairie,'" Fortin said on a recent summer afternoon. "They think I'm a kook."
Fortin, who administers after-school programs, captured this wild swarm in early May, and so far it's thriving. "My book said to take two pieces of cardboard and scoop them into a five-gallon paint can, so that's what I did," she said. "I was scared shitless. I had no idea what I was doing." She covered the can with a net and drove home. "It worked, and there they are."
Fortin put out a small jar of honey to make the new colony feel at home; since then, she's done nothing except peek at them once in a while. "It doesn't matter what you know and what you don't know," she said. "The bees know what they're doing." And what they do is pollinate.
Bees are the most paradoxical of insects. They trigger some of our deepest fears: a dark nest filled with squirming larvae tended by mindless laborers chemically controlled by a queen. And they sting. At the same time, they're linked to some of the sweetest things in life: flowers, honey, and romance. Love them or fear them, they're a key part of the human food chain.
Honeybees aren't native to North America, so indigenous plants don't need them for pollination. If all the honeybees disappeared, we'd still have corn and wheat. But most of the imported fruit and vegetable species we now think of as quintessentially Californian — almonds, grapes, plums, cucumbers, cantaloupe, asparagus — need the help of bees to wed male pollen to female pistil. Without bees, there would be no apples, no cherries, no tomatoes, no zucchini. Even tofu would be scarcer — soybeans depend partly on the honeybee for pollination.
Most of these crops are no longer pollinated by wild honeybees. Like many indigenous insects and plants, feral honeybees have been nearly wiped out by pesticides, loss of habitat, and parasites like the varroa mite.
Meanwhile, commercial beekeeping has come to resemble other kinds of factory farming. While the bees themselves retain more freedom of movement than almost any other living creature raised by man, a commercial bee lot is more like a cattle feed lot than a wild meadow.
Beehives are crammed close together in rows just a few feet apart; in the wild, a square mile supports at the most three or four hives. A wild colony's diet is diverse, comprising pollen and nectar from myriad plants. To compensate for the lack of forage around bee lots, bees are typically fed high-fructose corn syrup, the same stuff that's contributing to a human health crisis. And just like other agricultural livestock, bees become stressed when you crowd them together. They're more susceptible to diseases and parasites, less able to function naturally.
It's all making some bee scientists wonder: Is the epidemic known as Colony Collapse Disorder real, or are the bees simply being worked to death?
Big Beesness
If you want to put bees' value into dollars and cents, just look at California's almond industry. Almonds are our state's second-largest crop, with farmers raking in $2.34 billion in 2005. This year's yield, grown on 615,000 acres, is expected to be a record 1.310 billion pounds, up 18 percent from last year — despite the dire statistics about Colony Collapse Disorder.
As you drive through the Central Valley, admiring the miles of orchards in bloom, they look so peaceful and natural. In fact, our almond industry depends on a herculean human effort to subvert the natural order of things. In nature, most flowers don't get pollinated. But you don't get a billion-pound harvest by letting nature take its course. In the old days, an orchard owner might invite a beekeeper to keep hives on the land in a mutually beneficial arrangement. The agribusiness way is to rent hives for the two-week almond pollination season. This year, growers paid $150 per hive, placing three to five hives per acre.
Since 1999, beekeepers in the Pacific Northwest have earned four to five times more income from pollination than from the combined sales of honey and wax, according to a survey by Oregon State University.
But it was hairy out in the fields this year, as beekeepers from around the country raced to get their hives to California before they collapsed. Some growers found themselves renting empty hives. Thousands of beekeepers had done the math and begun building up their stock. It's not uncommon for a commercial operation to run to ten thousand hives, trucking them from California to South Dakota to Florida in the course of a single year. One million hives, or nearly half of all the hives in the United States, were hauled into California this year, according to Randy Oliver, a Grass Valley beekeeper who has pollinated almonds for 25 years.
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Old 08-14-2007, 09:16 PM   #37
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We've had FAR less honey bees around our gardens this year. In past years there were oodles of them buzzing from flower to flower all over the place. You couldn't hardly look at a flower without seeing a bee on it. But not so this year!

It's sad! Especially since we all depend on them for pollination of fruits, veggies, and, of course, flowers. I hope it's a short term problem that can be resolved!
I'd forgotten all about this thread until bright eyed's last post.

I ought to update our situation here with the bees. Over the last 4 weeks, there has been a very noticeable INCREASE in the honeybee population. We've got oodles and loads of bees buzzing around the flower beds, and a great percentage of them, now, are honeybees!!! Things are starting to look up!!!

And our veggie garden has been producing the best that it ever has in years!!! Lots and lots of squash! Bucket loads of tomatoes! Bell and sweet banana peppers by the dozens! And that's from just 8 squash plants, 8 tomato plants, 6 bell and 2 banana pepper plants. Good thing I cut back this year!
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Old 08-14-2007, 09:39 PM   #38
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My ggrandfather was a bee-keeper. If my grandmother was anything like him there would be no waiting for gumment approval if he thought it would save his hives. Grandma did not wait for permission from anyone!
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Old 08-16-2007, 07:26 AM   #39
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I went to one of my favorite restaurants a couple of weeks ago and a friend at the table ordered coffee. Once the coffee got to the table there were bees everywhere! It got so bad we had to move inside the restaurant! I wonder if the bees moved to Panama?

Maybe witness protection program?
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Old 09-01-2007, 03:55 PM   #40
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Where I am in the Northeast, it seems some years there are a lot of bees and other years not so many. Cyclical. My tomatoes, cukes, and beans did fine this summer, when I never saw more than one bee at a time.
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