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Old 02-16-2013, 07:29 PM   #21
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I still have my old Cannondale road bike hanging in my garage. Have not rode it in 20 years.
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Old 02-16-2013, 08:21 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by travelover View Post
What does a bicycle tune up consist of? I mean beyond the obvious points, condenser and spark plugs?
It probably includes replace the grease in the wheel hubs, the bottom bracket, and the steering tube. (all have loose ball bearings), and then adjusting the cones so the bearings work just right. In addition one would look at the brake shoes and check the cables and shifters out.
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Old 02-16-2013, 08:40 PM   #23
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My 1963 Chicago Schwinn will be 50 years old this year. It doesn't need a tune-up, it needs a complete restoration. I live on a dead-end road. Most days in the winter I ride the loop on the dead-end road to the main road. It's about a 3 mile loop.

The serial number on a Chicago Schwinn will indicate the exact day a bike was manufactured.
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Old 02-16-2013, 10:08 PM   #24
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I went out for 26 miles along a route I have been on many times with my Giant aluminum frame. At first, I was unsure if there was an advantage. Then I realized that the road vibration and the bumps I was feeling was through my hands and feet. Very little was transmitted up the stem to the seat (my butt). I then started hitting bumps on purpose. I wouldn't lift up, but just road through them. Amazing! The Damone is quick, responsive (and I am now sounding like a commercial).

Check for yourself at your local LBS. Now, I need to convince my DW that this will be a good investment. Not only for my motivation to keep active, but for my overall physical, and mental health.

Tailwinds!
Agree there is a difference between stiff aluminum (AL) & compliant carbon frame bike, and modern carbon bike is nice if you have the $$ to spare. HOWEVER difference ain't all that great. I've ridden multiple centuries (100+miles) on both my stiff Cannondale CAAD5 (all AL) and "plush" carbon Cannondale Synapse. Riding the same wheels (important!) IMHO the ride difference is similar to switching from 23 to sl wider 25 tires, and I do not hesitate to take my AL CAAD5 on long rides as the mood strikes me.

Pedal time- it's all good!
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Old 02-17-2013, 05:37 AM   #25
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How do you like the folding bike? How much do you ride?

Anyone else use folding bikes?
I bought a pair several years ago when I was trying to talk DW into a travel trailer. While I was carried away with enthusiasm I bought these two lightly used off Craigslist.

If storage space is at a premium then they are a viable solution but I found them uncomfortable. Admittedly perhaps a more expert fitter could adjust things so that is less of an issue. These came with the weed-whacker engines installed and those do work well, to the point that I was thinking a bicycle helmet is insufficient and a motorcycle helmet is more suitable for those speeds. Probably ~35 mph on level road, wide open.

I put them back up for sale last year in the bicycle listing on Craigslist but no offers. Next spring I'll put them up on the RV listing.
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Old 02-17-2013, 07:29 AM   #26
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My wife & I decided we want to do some mountain biking. Our budget wasn't big so we got a couple of Fuji Nevada 1.7 bikes - a step up from entry level but still low end. Even though it's in the 20's this morning we're going to head out and hit some trails.

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Old 02-17-2013, 09:23 AM   #27
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I ride (and tune myself) a 1980s vintage Fuji, bought at a garage sale twenty years ago for $40.
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Old 02-17-2013, 09:43 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by meierlde View Post
It probably includes replace the grease in the wheel hubs, the bottom bracket, and the steering tube. (all have loose ball bearings), and then adjusting the cones so the bearings work just right. In addition one would look at the brake shoes and check the cables and shifters out.
Thanks. Working with all those loose bearings is labor intensive.
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Old 02-17-2013, 10:35 AM   #29
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Here is my new Trek Madone that I got it last March. Get the trek, you will love it.

Also in the picture is my old Trek 400 that I bought new in 1986. Lots of miles on that bike, but it just wore out...and I couldn't turn the cranks...chainrings were too small . Cost to replace everything that was needed was too much, decided it was just time. Certainly not a LBYM item, but given the number of miles on the old one, if I get 30 years out of this one, ends up being about $100/year.

This was my one "Big Ticket Item" last year.
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Old 02-17-2013, 11:17 AM   #30
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How do you like the folding bike? How much do you ride?

Anyone else use folding bikes?

We were thinking of getting a pair so we can take them with us on our road trips. We were thinking it would be easier to take into hotels at night.
There are a lot of different folding bikes on the market. Each has a different purpose. Prices vary enormously. I've got a Bike Friday New World Tourist, which is a high-quality folder intended for going on trips. It is not a quick-folder good for taking on public transport. It does, however, pack into a sub-62" dimension hard plastic suitcase which avoids the ridiculously excessive bicycle fees most airlines now charge. Most importantly, it rides as well as a regular touring bike. I've toured on mine extensively in many countries around the world, as well as commuted on it for years. It's not cheap, but it's a great bike.
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Old 02-17-2013, 12:54 PM   #31
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Poking around the web I came across the IF Mode Folding Bike. That looks so easy to fold and unfold.

IF Mode Folding Bike

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Old 02-17-2013, 12:58 PM   #32
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Having a good bike you will ride a lot will help you LBYM. Not nearly as many doctor visits, better BP, longer life, less gasoline. Etc.
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Old 02-17-2013, 01:35 PM   #33
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This is funny...a folding/unfolding contest.



I like that Mouton 2 speed that detaches
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Old 02-18-2013, 01:16 PM   #34
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Some people swear by Brompton folding bikes, but they're really expensive!

Thanks to all who gave me feedback on folding bikes.
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Old 02-18-2013, 02:22 PM   #35
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With all this folding bike talk, I've been reading up on one called the "Carryme."

The bike has really small wheels (only 8 inches), and is truly portable at only 18 lbs.

Both functional and somewhat comical.

CarryMe USA Compact folding bikes. Light to carry, fun to ride
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Old 02-18-2013, 08:17 PM   #36
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Something else to consider would be a lightweight steel frame. The ride is always great and the lower price is usually something that you will enjoy even more. I've ridden for many years and on aluminum, steel and carbon fiber. Really like the steel and carbon fiber frames. Still have a 1999 Trek 5200 US Postal model (all carbon fiber). Unfortunately cant ride it now due to neck and spine issues, hopefully will be able to again one day. Trying to still ride a hybrid now as being in the drops right now just doesn't work for me. Doesn't really matter what you are on as long as you are out riding! Have multiple bikes now and lways will.
Have fun.
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