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Old 04-22-2015, 10:44 AM   #21
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Here's the kind of boat that I've owned (photo linked from the Web).

If I lived in the Puget Sound, AND had my dream house with a water front, I would get some kind of boat to go crabbing. But as a landlubber in the southwest, a boat would not get much use.

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Old 04-22-2015, 02:20 PM   #22
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The thread has started the memory juices flowing.
If you have time, let me tell you about my Brother-in-law Jack, and his boating experiences...

This happened many years ago, and he has since passed away. too young...
Jack was by no means mentally impaired. As a VP at Amica, quite successful.
Thing is, he wasn't much into "fixing", and his home tool chest consisted of one Phillips screwdriver, an ice cube cracker hammer, and a bent table knife.
We bought him a home handyman kit for Christmas and after he passed away, 5 years later, we found the screwdriver, hammer and kitchen knife, but the kit was still in the Christmas wrapping in the back of a closet.

We all lived in Rhode Island and spent a lot of time at the beaches and in the bay, boating. Now this was around the time of transition in boats, from wood to Fiberglas. Rhode Island has many, many boat yards, and it is common to see dozens or even hundreds of boats, up on the ways... (ways are the stilts that hold the boat upright when out of the water) Many, many wooden boats... big cabincruisers and yachts. Wooden boats that the owners just kept, after they upgraded to fiberglas, because they thought they had value.
A side story here... Uncle Dean, a policeman, bought a 55 footer, small yacht for $3000, and just painted the outside with house paint, and left it on the ways. Saturday nights, the police, their wives and the auxillary would all show up, climb the ladder and party til Sunday morning. Very elegant... even though the boat would never, ever go to sea again.

Anyway, Jack decides to become a boater, though he's essentially helpless about fixing, and not to inclined to adventure beyond the easy chair, watching TV. He finds a 25 foot Chris Craft cabin cruiser... very nice, and buys it for the low price of $5000, then adds a $1500 trailer and brings it home to the driveway, to spruce it up, and detail it. New windows in front, and new galley appliances, matresses, curtains and stuff, so it looks beautiful. He and my other brother inlaw then paint the boat, new copper bottom paint and refinish some of the mahogany.
Then to the boatyard for an engine cleanup and check. By now, an additional $3000...

A week later, the maiden voyage... out of the boatyard slip in Warwick (with help) and out into the bay for the trial run around Prudence Island. Or at least halfway around. Stopped to fish, and the boat woudn't restart. Towed back to the harbor... Diagnosis... starter engine failure... rusted and burned out. Now, for those who haven't been there, the starter motor on this boat is under the engine, and there is no access except to drydock the boat, remove floorboards, and other built in stuff... and to use a crane to lift the engine out of the boat for repair. In the process, broke one of the new windows. A weeks work, and another $2000 later... (and total cruising time of 1/2 hour under power)... and all's well and ready to go again.

Family and friends... two weekends out for trips around the bay, and Jack is in boater heaven... beautiful boat... captain and owner of a full fledged yacht. Life doesn't get any better than this.

Back up a bit... When the boat was in Jacks yard, and they were painting, they found this four inch patch of metal screwed to the outside bottom of the boat. All corroded and looking messy. Ground off the corrosion and put several coats of paint on top of the plate. Now, unless you're a power boater, you may not know that the boat needs a ground... actually a ground to the water. That's a sacrificial metal plate.

Jack goes away for two weeks, and on return there's a message, to call the boat yard... "Hello... Jack?... Your boat just sank at the slip... sitting on the bottom. What do you want us to do?" When the sacrificial zinc plate didn't ground the boat, the screws holding it in got rusty and the plate which was part of a hull plug, had disintegrated and opened a hole in the bottom.

Jack didn't give up easily... long and short... had the boat hauled out, engine removed and overhauled, all new upholstery, new everything... costing about $4,000... and went on to:
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-
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Selling the boat for $5,000. We figured that his great buy cost about $1500 an hour for the time he used the boat. A perfect example of the saying that 'the first day when you purchase a boat, is the second happiest day of your life'.

As I recall, the boat was a 25 foot Chris Craft Cavalier like this.
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Old 04-22-2015, 02:26 PM   #23
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Heh, about a 12 foot rowboat when I was 12 or so. Used to keep it chained to a tree at the lake 2 blocks from the house and be gone on it all the time. Managed to get myself stuck real good on a stump out in the middle of the lake and only got off when I hit on the idea of using the rope with the 3 sash weights tied to it that served as anchor to hook another stump and pull myself off.


Then a 17 foot wood boat with fiberglassing powered by a 7.5 horse outboard. Ran all over Barnegat bay (very slowly) with that.


Last was a canoe I left behind when we escaped NJ. That s probably the last boat I will own, unless I end up inheriting Dad's Mako that is as old as I am.
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My Boats
Old 04-22-2015, 05:09 PM   #24
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My Boats

Pygmy kayak, Necky, Folbot single & double
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Old 04-22-2015, 06:33 PM   #25
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I have had several from my teenage years onward - 12 ft wood runabout (25hp Johnson); 14 ft plywood inboard (40HP Graymarine); Nordex Bat (12 ft sailboat); 16ft Sea Ray (65HP Merc); 16 ft Silverline I/O (65Hp I/O). I promised myself that I would not get another boat unless I lived on the water. The best situation is to know someone who owns a boat!
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Old 04-22-2015, 07:10 PM   #26
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Hornet 14 or 16, (can't remember which) when I lived in Oregon. Capri 15 when I lived in DC that I used to sail on the Potomac. J 24 in Colorado. Boat less now although I have been known to rent on occasion.
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Boats we own(ed)
Old 04-22-2015, 09:30 PM   #27
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Boats we own(ed)

My dad and grandpa built a "sunfish" style sailboat for my brother and me. We spent many memorable hours out on Brown's Lake in SW Wisconsin.

Years later, my mother was painting this picture of our sailboat. The teacher tried to tell her that she was painting the sail wrong. The teacher didn't have a clue about the shape of a sunfish's sail. Mom just ignored her teacher and painted the painting her way.ImageUploadedByEarly Retirement Forum1429756235.750634.jpg

This picture hangs above the computer in my man cave.
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Old 04-22-2015, 09:31 PM   #28
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Yes... there have been many threads on this, but we like the subject so much that it's a chance to share experiences, pictures, stories and memories.
It will take some time to put together a list, but this for starters.

Spent 100's of hours in this 1950's 17 ft. mahogany Thompson runabout, in Narragansett Bay... from Barrington to Providence, to Newport and every anchorage along the way. Fishing, swimming, skiing, clamming and watching air shows at Quonset Naval Air Station. Our kids grew up in bathing suits and could sail our plywood (original) 1951 Sunfish at age 5.

Your boats?
Think what a honey that Thompson would be with a modern 4 stroke outboard. You could actually afford to run it.
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Old 04-22-2015, 09:50 PM   #29
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I've had a couple of inboard outboard runabouts since 1974. Also had Jet Ski's and Sea Doo's since 1985. I also bought my first Starcraft 24' pontoon boat in 1985--with one of the first Yamaha 115 hp motors in the U.S. And I still have it.

I now am running a Bennington 24' tritoon boat with a Yamaha 150 hp motor--40 mph toon. We also have a Yamaha Waverunner to chase the blue herons with.

I'm fortunate to have a 16,000 acre lake in my front yard with double boathouses/lifts. And we have 3 Robert Trent Jones golf courses within eyesight. I hope to have a six mile water view of the sunset for many years in my retirement.
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Old 04-23-2015, 08:34 AM   #30
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My first boat... Actually mine and Johnny MacQueen's first boat...

Best as I can remember... Summer 1943... age 7, Johnny was 8... after watching Errol Flynn in the Sea Hawk... decided to build a ship to sail on the only water we were allowed to go to by ourselves...Spec's Pond...
Three boards... best as I can remember... one 5" x7ft., one 6" x 6ft. and one 7"x 4ft. A big triangle... more or less the shape of a boat. The bottom? pieces of linoleum... nailed with whatever we could find. Then.. Painted... with whitewash from John's grandgather's cellar.
A thing of beauty... ready for launching at Spec's pond. We had good imaginations, and had made swords... but forgot paddles. Unscrewed the basket from my brother's baby carriage and we had an instant boat trailer for the quarter mile trip to the pond.
The whole neighborhood gang came down for the launch... maybe 6 or 7 kids.
Waded into the muck at the edge, through the reeds, and into... open water.

Ten feet from shore... our vessel began to leak...

Now, Spec's Pond is only about five feet deep in the middle, so we jumped out and hauled our craft ashore for repairs... Simple... logical... quicK and easy... We used moss that was growing on the shoreline, and packed it tightly along the bottom edge.

Second launch... thirty feet from shore into deep water... a glorious, successful beginning of the Sea Hawk adventure... John and I with swords pointed to far off lands...

... until our beloved craft sank... laden with moss and linoleum ... right to the bottom.

And there it lies, even today. Look closely and you can see this treasure ship at the bottom of the pond.

All master boat builders have to start somewhere!
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Old 04-23-2015, 04:18 PM   #31
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We have quite a bit of experience but really it was a pretty mild trip given the calm summer weather. Knowing the tides and currents is what counts, especially in a 17 foot boat that is design limited to about 6.5 knots close hauled. Going against a 4 knot current....sucks (alternatively, going with a 4 knot current wing on wing and you are flying).

We didn't start at Friday Harbor though...we started at Anacortes.
Hull speed should be about 5.15 knots on a 17 footer.

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Old 04-23-2015, 04:27 PM   #32
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Here is the boat I lived on for a year while tooling around the Bahamas, a Brewer 12.8.


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Old 04-23-2015, 04:27 PM   #33
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Here is our current boat, a Freedom 32.


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Old 04-23-2015, 04:36 PM   #34
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Here I am learning to sail on a Dolphin Sr, circa 1974. I've owned 6 boats since then, 4 were J/Boats- Better Sailboats for People Who Love Sailing..

"Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing absolutely nothing half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats. Simply messing... about in boats or with boats. In or out of 'em, it doesn't matter. Nothing seems really to matter, that's the charm of it. Whether you get away, or whether you don't; whether you arrive at your destination or whether you reach somewhere else, or whether you never get anywhere at all, you're always busy, and you never do anything in particular; and when you've done it there's always something else to do, and you can do it if you like, but you'd much better not." from The Wind in the Willows
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Old 04-23-2015, 05:04 PM   #35
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Here I am learning to sail on a Dolphin Sr, circa 1974. I've owned 6 boats since then, 4 were J/Boats- Better Sailboats for People Who Love Sailing..

"Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing — absolutely nothing — half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats. Simply messing... about in boats — or with boats. In or out of 'em, it doesn't matter. Nothing seems really to matter, that's the charm of it. Whether you get away, or whether you don't; whether you arrive at your destination or whether you reach somewhere else, or whether you never get anywhere at all, you're always busy, and you never do anything in particular; and when you've done it there's always something else to do, and you can do it if you like, but you'd much better not." from The Wind in the Willows

Welcome back. So, your departing post was an April Fool's trick all along!! (and like many others, I fell for it)


Sincere thanks and goodbye for now
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Old 04-23-2015, 05:30 PM   #36
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Hull speed should be about 5.15 knots on a 17 footer.

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Yes, but you can exceed design calculated hull speed when close hauled at a significant heel (to the point where my wife gets scared we are going over )

In 0 knot current we have done 6.8 knots via GPS at this point of sail.


edit: but some of that could have been surfing
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Old 04-23-2015, 06:25 PM   #37
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When we were first married, my husband's buddies had boats and we would party with them. Thought about getting a boat of our own until we saw the repairs and maintenance they had. Really enjoyed the boats and still go out with friends but will never own one.
You all have some beautiful boats.
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Old 04-23-2015, 07:03 PM   #38
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I'd had a couple of canoes and a kayak. The closest I've come to a motor boat is when I bought a 2 HP Johnson outboard to save some paddling on the bigger lakes in Canada. Shoulda bought a Honda - the Johnson was too noisy.
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Old 04-23-2015, 07:39 PM   #39
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Think what a honey that Thompson would be with a modern 4 stroke outboard. You could actually afford to run it.
Someone on our lake has a nice old 16' wood runabout that has been nicely restored with a relatively new Honda 25 hp 4-stroke outboard on it. The light gray Honda outboard looks great on it and looks like an old outboard from a distance... but has some real nice technology under the covers.
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Old 04-23-2015, 07:59 PM   #40
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Midpack back to talk boats...

So now another BIL story... different BIL... In the early 70's we lived in Falmouth and he lived in Gray Gables (long ago, the home of the Summer Whitehouse) at the exit of the Cape Cod Canal into Buzzards Bay...

Gordon was an adventurer who would try anything, and living by the water decided to buy a sailboat... a 22' Herreshoff Eagle... that despite the hallowed name, was an absolute dog of a boat. Gaff rigged sail and a wide beam meant that not only could it not be sailed close hauled... but not even well on a close reach.

His second day of learning to sail, w/ DW, her sister and I along for the ride.... we sail east toward Cape Cod Bay with a good west wind.
Most of the way to Sandwich... and then... ebb tide, and, too late... we realize we have to go back. And then it starts... tack,tack,tack and we're making about 100 yards on each tack across the canal... We're barely moving on a close reach. An hour of this, and then the tide changes. The tide can run at 6 knots, and not only is the wind against us, but so is the tide... we're moving backwards towards the bay... away from home... and no anchorages...

That's not the worst... we're still tacking and suddenly see this huge wave coming up from the mouth of the canal... what the? there we are, near the middle of the canal, and up from the depths, rising like a bad dream... the conning tower (wings) of a nuclear submarine, probably transiting from Boston through Buzzards Bay to Newport... these things are BIG... and scary... pulling a five foot wave...

We really weren't in any danger, as we were closer to shore at the time, but I have to admit, I was glad there was a head in the cockpit.

A friendly cabin cruiser saw our plight, and graciously towed us back to Gordon's slip...
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