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Old 10-21-2012, 02:26 PM   #21
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Since we have wandered into the kitchen, pop over to YouTube and search for "Supersizers". It's a BBC series in which a food critic and a comedian spend a week dressing up and eating the diet of historical eras in British history (with a few exceptions such as Ancient Rome and the French Revolution). Each hour long episode is comprised of 6 videos. It's hilarious and very informative.

"Gobsmacked" is a word very familiar to me from my youth in Ireland and I always assumed it was Irish because "gob" is Irish for "mouth" and it means "speechless". But apparently it originated in Scotland in the 1980s. Scots Gaelic is similar to Irish Gaelic.
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Old 10-21-2012, 02:38 PM   #22
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My favorite British words are 'bangers and mash' and 'pint'. They are great when used together.
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Old 10-21-2012, 03:33 PM   #23
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I have never heard an American use the word muppet in that way either.

I've been watching quite a few period dramas recently, mostly set in England in the late 1800's/early 1900's and think it would be perfectly ripping if we still used words like "bounder" and "beastly".
I call people "muppets" every now and then but I have no idea why I started using it or if I ever heard it used in that manner before. I never watch BBC and I had no idea that anyone else used the word in any other way other than to talk about the actual "Muppets".
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Old 10-21-2012, 03:54 PM   #24
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Jobsworth, gleaned from reading British papers online, (I haven't set foot there for almost 30 years, and I don't recall hearing it used then, although the link says otherwise), is one of my favorites, and one that, IMHO, should transfer well to North America.
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Old 10-21-2012, 04:19 PM   #25
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I only use autumn when referring to the autumnal equinox. Twit I have used for decades and que was a common DP term. I never use any of the others. I know a lot of British words they use to describe various parts of an automobile but that's another story.
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Old 10-21-2012, 06:23 PM   #26
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I'm familiar with most, but I worked (and drank) with quite a few Brit expats back in the day. Some of those terms I use now. New for me are sussed, numpty, muppet, chav.
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Old 10-21-2012, 06:25 PM   #27
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Just a difference in outlook. I've always thought it was offal good.

My favorite offal is heart (beef or chicken), but chicken gizzards is also a favorite snack around my house. Liver and onions or bacon has also always been a treat. Kidneys are very good as well. Does tongue count? That's a delicacy in my book.
+1

Had tongue and brains (tacos) yesterday for breakfast.
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Old 10-21-2012, 07:00 PM   #28
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Never Mind the Bullocks! Sorry to post this again so soon. No, I take that back. Not sorry at all.
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Old 10-21-2012, 07:15 PM   #29
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Double post.....oops.
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Old 10-21-2012, 07:16 PM   #30
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Never Mind the Bullocks!
Bullocks? Or?
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Old 10-21-2012, 07:38 PM   #31
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Bloody hell :-)
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Old 10-21-2012, 08:08 PM   #32
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Anybody spare me a fag?

No, not someone with an alternative sexual preferance. This is one of those words who's original meaning and useage died during my lifetime. Why can't those Brits have a static language?
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Old 10-22-2012, 08:20 AM   #33
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I spent a lot of time in the UK for work and picked up some of their expressions but I use very few that are on the list.

My favourites are "sort out" and "keen". It seems much more polite to say I am "not keen" on something vs "that's bullsh*t".
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Old 10-22-2012, 08:32 AM   #34
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I spent a lot of time in the UK for work and picked up some of their expressions but I use very few that are on the list.

My favourites are "sort out" and "keen". It seems much more polite to say I am "not keen" on something vs "that's bullsh*t".
Yeah, yeah.. don't get your knickers in a twist... ;o)
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Old 10-22-2012, 10:12 AM   #35
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We had a high school girl from England stay with us for a week or so about 15 years ago and she described some chocolate chip cookies as "gorgeous." Which makes sense in terms of something one would gorge on and not a compliment to their appearance, as I would use that term (now we like to use it as she did when we see cookies, or biscuits as she called them).
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Old 10-22-2012, 10:23 AM   #36
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I lived in England for a while I always liked


put some wood in the hole = close the door

plimsoles = sneakers

wooly cartigan = sweater

wancker = fool, stupid, silly, and may other things

fancy dress party = costume party

chicken choker = yup, that

wellies = rubber boots
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Old 10-22-2012, 10:26 AM   #37
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wooly cartigan = sweater
Actually 'Cardigan"...named after the guy who 'led' the Charge of The Light Brigade.
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Old 10-22-2012, 10:30 AM   #38
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Actually 'Cardigan"...named after the guy who 'led' the Charge of The Light Brigade.
Yes, and we Americans also call sweaters that button up the front Cardigans. If I needed a warm wool Cardigan, I would call it that as well (well, maybe not "wooly Cardigan" but "wool Cardigan". So I am thinking that maybe that is not a Britishism.
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Old 10-22-2012, 10:39 AM   #39
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I lived in England for a while I always liked
put some wood in the hole = close the door I'm a 51 year old Brit, and I've never heard that one - I suspect it may be regional. Speaking it in my head, it sounds like it could be from further North than where I grew up.

plimsoles = sneakers Not sure about this - to me, plimsolls are more like thin gym/ballet slippers. Sneakers are "trainers" in the UK.

wancker = fool, stupid, silly, and may other things Spelt "wanker". Not acceptable on TV before 9pm; calling someone a wanker to their face in any context other than banter is fighting talk. Brits wet themselves laughing when they get to Pennsylvania and see Wanker beer on sale, and they (and the Irish, in the case of this image) will make substantial detours on trips of Bavaria to get a picture at the Wank city limits sign. "To get wankered" is also occasionally "to get drunk".

wellies = rubber boots Yes, they were allegedly invented by the Duke of Wellington, of beating-Napoleon-at-Waterloo fame. Green wellies are considered upper-middle class; wear black ones to avoid social commentary. "The green welly brigade" was a popular way to refer to well-to-do Range Rover drivers 20 or so years ago, although this is now going out of fashion.
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Old 10-22-2012, 10:47 AM   #40
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We had a high school girl from England stay with us for a week or so about 15 years ago and she described some chocolate chip cookies as "gorgeous." Which makes sense in terms of something one would gorge on and not a compliment to their appearance, as I would use that term (now we like to use it as she did when we see cookies, or biscuits as she called them).
That's true - - some meanings of the word are falling out of favor in the US. The dictionary.com definition is

"gor·geous [gawr-juhs]adjective
1. splendid or sumptuous in appearance, coloring, etc.; magnificent: a gorgeous gown; a gorgeous sunset.
2. Informal . extremely good, enjoyable, or pleasant: I had a gorgeous time."

So, I guess that second definition is the one she used, and that is falling out of favor.
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