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Quite Nice
Old 10-22-2012, 10:51 AM   #41
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Quite Nice

What does it really mean

Quite nice = I like, it's good
Quite nice, really = meh, nothing special
Quite nice, really, if you like that sort of thing = don't bother me again with this
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Old 10-22-2012, 11:19 AM   #42
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No doubt about it, this thread has 'sexed up' this site!
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Old 10-22-2012, 11:20 AM   #43
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""wancker = fool, stupid, silly, and may other things Spelt "wanker". Not acceptable on TV before 9pm; calling someone a wanker to their face in any context other than banter is fighting talk. Brits wet themselves laughing when they get to Pennsylvania and see Wanker beer on sale, and they (and the Irish, in the case of this image) will make substantial detours on trips of Bavaria to get a picture at the Wank city limits sign. "To get wankered" is also occasionally "to get drunk".""

And the Brits also kill themselves laughing when American tourists refer to their little waistbelt carrybags as "fanny packs" fanny being a british euphimism for "ladybits"
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Old 10-22-2012, 11:22 AM   #44
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Going a little further afield, (after all, threads do develop a life of their own)........the first time I was in South Africa my late wife & I rented a small camper and set out from Jozi towards Kruger Park.....looking to find the highway I pulled over and asked a guy for directions.

In a fairly heavy Afrikaans accent he said "Turn right at the first Robot and then left at the next Robot".

Puzzled, I thanked him and continued driving........a little further along, painted in white on the roadway, it said "Robot Ahead".....Traffic Lights!



Years later I related this story to a South African woman in Vancouver...she gave me her version:

When she first arrived in Vancouver, she was walking downtown in the evening.......she asked a cop for directions and was told to "Turn left at the lights"........she looked around her and thought "There's nothing BUT lights".
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Old 10-22-2012, 11:43 AM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by W2R View Post
That's true - - some meanings of the word are falling out of favor in the US. The dictionary.com definition is

"gor·geous [gawr-juhs]adjective
1. splendid or sumptuous in appearance, coloring, etc.; magnificent: a gorgeous gown; a gorgeous sunset.
2. Informal . extremely good, enjoyable, or pleasant: I had a gorgeous time."

So, I guess that second definition is the one she used, and that is falling out of favor.
I have heard Texans use the word "gorgeous" in the second sense, although it's more used to describe physical things. The most common use would be "a gorgeous girl", a phrase that can be used equally by a man or a woman, followed by food - typically food that one would expect to find gorgeous anyway (that is, it met high expectations; you can't really say "surprisingly gorgeous", but you can say "surprisingly nice", which is of course not quite the same as "nice, surprisingly").

Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelB View Post
Quite nice = I like, it's good
Quite nice, really = meh, nothing special
Quite nice, really, if you like that sort of thing = don't bother me again with this
See also:
Quite good: Better then expected
Quite good: Less good than expected
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Old 10-22-2012, 12:48 PM   #46
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I lived in England for a while I always liked


put some wood in the hole = close the door
This is a common phrase in the Black Country and parts of Lancashire that I first heard when I went to college in 1973 and students from those areas would say, "put wood int 'ole lad" if ever I left the door open

I certainly do love to gorge myself in the gorgeous cheeses from the Cheshire Gorge
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Old 10-22-2012, 01:04 PM   #47
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Can any British people help on a word meaning? "Lights." I have a Maltese recipe for rabbit that mentions sauteing the rabbit along with its liver and "lights." Kidneys?
Lung. To me it is not British, my Scots-American grandmaother used it 60 years ago. ANd she hadnt ever seen the old country, nor likely had her grandparents.

Ha
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Old 10-22-2012, 02:22 PM   #48
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Some of the words, like Mate, I hear more from my Aussie cow-orkers. Of course, they got them from the British. I recognized all but one but then I w*rk in an International MegaCorp.
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Old 10-23-2012, 02:08 AM   #49
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"Brilliant" is as overused by the Brits as "amazing" and formerly "awesome" here...
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Old 10-23-2012, 02:25 AM   #50
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Does 'fag' still have a much different meaning than the US version?
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Old 10-23-2012, 03:30 AM   #51
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Does 'fag' still have a much different meaning than the US version?
Yes. It's still a cigarette. A minor usage, among those who went to the very poshest boarding schools, is to describe a junior student who acts a gofer for a more senior one; apparently this system is now defunct (source: Wikipedia).

Faggots, in the UK, are cheap meatballs, composed principally of liver and other offal. There is no abbreviation for these to "fag".

Brits are nowadays generally aware of the pejorative use of the word "faggot" and will avoid it (or snicker) if Americans are around - also, the food item in question is becoming less popular. However, no such restraint applies to "fag" except perhaps in the most politically correct circles, where not a lot of people smoke cigarettes anyway.
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Old 10-23-2012, 12:02 PM   #52
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We had lots of language mishaps when we were in Peru with a rather multicultural bunch of English speakers: US, UK, and Australians, New Zealanders, and don't get me started on the Irish!

My favorites were spanners = wrenches (that took a while) and then jumper = jacket.
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Old 10-23-2012, 12:11 PM   #53
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Familiar with them all except numpty and skint. I didn't realize some were British. I guess I watch a bit too much BBC/international tv and read too much Economist lol. Going to engineering school and encountering classmates that learned British English in their native countries probably helped anglify me too.
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Old 10-23-2012, 12:58 PM   #54
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Originally Posted by Sarah in SC View Post
My favorites were spanners = wrenches (that took a while) and then jumper = jacket.
jumper = sweater in the north of England so some regional differences as well
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Old 10-23-2012, 01:11 PM   #55
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Old 10-23-2012, 06:08 PM   #56
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Thought of a few more on my drive back home from the gym.

Arse

Smalls = underpants

Blimey = surprised

Brolly = umbrella

I learned to love pork pies when I was over there - the store bought type
I had were basically spam inside a pastry....not very interested in them now.

Really miss the beers and ales - drinking them warm took some getting used to.

I read somewhere that "watch your P's & Q's" came from England. "Mind your pints and quarts" was a way the barman told a crowd in the pub to quiet down.
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Old 10-23-2012, 06:14 PM   #57
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Blimey = surprised
Often "Gor Blimey".......evolved from "God blind me"...way back when.
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Old 10-23-2012, 06:32 PM   #58
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jumper = sweater in the north of England so some regional differences as well
We used jumper to mean sweater in the Midlands too.
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Old 10-23-2012, 07:30 PM   #59
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Originally Posted by kumquat
I never realized they were British. I recognize about 20 as being common since my youth. But, I live in Canada, so YMMV.
+1.

I recognized almost all of them with the exception of 3 or 4.
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Old 10-23-2012, 08:28 PM   #60
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My favorites were spanners = wrenches (that took a while) and then jumper = jacket.
A spanner is also a very specific type of wrench that I don't see much anymore outside of the military. Which is probably a good thing.

https://www.google.com/search?num=10....1.Hlrfv0k2CNQ
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