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Old 04-17-2011, 05:49 PM   #21
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I burn wood therefore I am.
You need a car with a steam engine...

... with a manual stick shift too.
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Old 04-17-2011, 06:20 PM   #22
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We heat our 2,000 sq ft house with our woodstove-like fireplace (Regency Warmhearth). We have mild winters here (rarely below freezing), but some years we need fires all summer long.

Collecting, cutting, splitting, moving firewood, and starting fires a few times a day is sometimes fun and sometimes tiresome, but at least the splitting counts as exercise.

ThaoWood3.jpgThaoWoodpile.jpg

It works because we like the bedroom cold, and spend most of our time in the living room.

For the past four years or more I've gotten free wood from trees downed during storms.

But for this year, I'm out of wood, and we are running the furnace to keep the house at 64 degrees, and wearing long underwear. It's nice to get up and just have breakfast rather than get up, start the fire, and have breakfast.

I'll have to decide whether to buy wood, since the wood I have now for next year won't last all year.
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Old 04-17-2011, 06:40 PM   #23
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Dang T-Al. You got some mad wood stackin' skillz
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Old 04-18-2011, 05:52 AM   #24
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One of the first things we did after we bought the ranch was put a wood stove in the house. The previous owners saw a fallen tree as a problem and burned it where it fell. We saw the fallen tree as an energy source.

We have four other stacks just like this one and we'll be adding more if we get hurricane force winds through here this year. We put goat wire between the t-posts at the ends of the stacks to hold the wood on the pallets. We have a five foot firebreak around the area where we store the wood.
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Old 04-18-2011, 09:43 AM   #25
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My father still cuts, hauls and splits his firewood. And he just turned 90 years old! He says it helps keep him in shape and he genuinely enjoys the process.

Mom is one of those people who needs a sweater if the room is below 80 deg. F. in the winter. Dad keeps the fire stoked. During our visits, DW and I nearly suffer heat stroke as we keep our house around 68-70 F. We take gym shorts and T-shirts to wear.
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Old 04-18-2011, 10:39 AM   #26
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We supplement gas heat with wood heat. Ha makes a good point about the pollution from wood burning. We have a high efficiency Jotul wood stove (from Norway) that puts out very little pollution. DH gets wood free from a variety of places and likes splitting and stacking it. He must have been a lumberjack in a prior life!

Oh, and the cats love it for sure. Important point since we live for the comfort and convenience of the kitties
We also have a high efficiency Jotul in our California home, and when we move back for good intend to use it for most of our heat. We love it, and I also love to split and stack it. We also see this a part of our emergency preparedness program. The furnace in our home is propane, and at over 3 bucks a gallon, and a 4300 sq foot house, the Jotul and a couple hundred dollars worth of wood make huge economic sense, and it is a relatively clean, carbon neutral heat source. We do use the propane furnace to take the chill off if we are not going to be home longer than the time it takes to get up, showered and ready to go somewhere all day.

If I had to do it over again, I would have made the house much smaller, and would have designed it better for wood heating. The Jotul is in a large, open family room with a 2 story ceiling, so a lot of the heat goes upstairs to the kids rooms...but we are now empty nesters. We may end up using the bonus room upstairs for more of our winter activities...just fire up the stove in the evening and go upstairs...then check on the stove every hour or so. DW's hobby room is the bonus room anyway, so we'll likely spend a lot of time in the cooler months in there, when it's too chilly to spend a lot if time outside.

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Old 04-19-2011, 04:47 PM   #27
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Al,

Can you explain the dome shaped pile of wood? Is it solid wood or is wood stacked around something? It is one cool looking pile of wood!
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Old 04-19-2011, 05:01 PM   #28
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Old 04-19-2011, 05:16 PM   #29
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...then check on the stove every hour or so.
oh yick. This is one reason the idea of a masonry stove appeals to me more than a regular old wood stove. Light a hot, fast fire that burns for an hour or two to heat up the stone and cement that then radiates the stored up heat for the next 6-12 hours without having to stoke any coals. Also makes for really clean chimneys I hear.
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Old 04-19-2011, 05:30 PM   #30
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That's a beautiful fireplace and a beautiful room.
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Old 04-19-2011, 06:48 PM   #31
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The state of Washington has strict rules about woodstove emissions. Nevertheless, during all but 3 summer months woodstoves are the major source of particulate pollution>2.5 microns diameter, the most damaging kind to human health.

Nice healthy image, but not so great in reality.

Ha
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Old 04-19-2011, 11:10 PM   #32
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oh yick. This is one reason the idea of a masonry stove appeals to me more than a regular old wood stove. Light a hot, fast fire that burns for an hour or two to heat up the stone and cement that then radiates the stored up heat for the next 6-12 hours without having to stoke any coals. Also makes for really clean chimneys I hear.
I've read several articles about these massive stone structures and you can heat a house with minimal wood, around 1.5 cord for a winter. The down side is they cost a fortune, several years ago the price was in the $15-20,000 range! A wood stove is much less ($2500-3500) and even at $200 or $225 a cord it takes a long time to justify that initial outlay. They are popular in Scandinavian countries.
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Old 04-19-2011, 11:31 PM   #33
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Is there anything no matter how obscure that you can't find on YouTube? YouTube is the 9th wonder of the modern world!

This is the musical version that was played on AM radio back then. I can remember a July night parked on Horse Sit Road (yep that's what we called it!) standing outside the car watching heat lightening and smoking some strange substance listening to this song! There aren't many songs from the 60's I really still like but this is one of them, seems like this song always sounds good whenever I hear it. I was surprised to see that Arthur Brown is white, for some reason I always thought he was black not that it matters really. Nutty video!


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Old 04-20-2011, 09:21 AM   #34
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Al,

Can you explain the dome shaped pile of wood? Is it solid wood or is wood stacked around something? It is one cool looking pile of wood!
Yes, it's called a "holz hausen" or "wood house." You pretty much make a ring of wood on the perimeter, and put wood inside stacked vertically. Here's an article on how to build it. It's supposed to be efficient for drying the wood, and it's definitely an efficient use of space. I've built a couple over the years.

Bigger ones are easier:

Holz2.jpg
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Old 04-20-2011, 01:29 PM   #35
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Is there anything no matter how obscure that you can't find on YouTube? YouTube is the 9th wonder of the modern world!

This is the musical version that was played on AM radio back then. I can remember a July night parked on Horse Sit Road (yep that's what we called it!) standing outside the car watching heat lightening and smoking some strange substance listening to this song! There aren't many songs from the 60's I really still like but this is one of them, seems like this song always sounds good whenever I hear it. I was surprised to see that Arthur Brown is white, for some reason I always thought he was black not that it matters really. Nutty video!


Very cool veremchuka. I was going to post this one but ended up posting the other instead as I had never seen it before, and it also has him doing his freaky white man dance. They are both cool though - and he's wearing that Viking fire helmet (or whatever it is) in both of them.

Talking of songs that never go out of style, I was walking home from the market yesterday. As I walked past a large (200 unit) apartment building that is better known for having low-riders playing loud hip-hop parked outside, one woman had her apartment windows fully open. She was singing along, at the very top of her voice and with great passion, to Journey's "Don't Stop Believing". It was cheesy, hilarious and epic all at the same time - a classic comedy movie moment!
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Old 04-20-2011, 11:34 PM   #36
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Yes, it's called a "holz hausen" or "wood house." You pretty much make a ring of wood on the perimeter, and put wood inside stacked vertically. Here's an article on how to build it. It's supposed to be efficient for drying the wood, and it's definitely an efficient use of space. I've built a couple over the years.

Bigger ones are easier:

Attachment 11623
Thanks Al that's a great article. Pretty ingenious how this creates a chimney effect that speeds up the seasoning. It's not only practical but ascetically pleasing!
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Old 04-21-2011, 09:48 AM   #37
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We burned 6 cords this year. 4 at home and 2 at the lake. All in wood stoves. Really not sure what the savings are because we've always burned wood. It's delivered as grapple (24 ft log length) and replaces my gym membership (as I cut split and stack it myself).

FWIW my wood-guy points out it costs $40/cord to do it yourself. This accounts for only: gas, chain oil, blade sharpen. Life insurance and saw maintenance are additional costs.

Last year the wood with delivery costs were $125/cord. This will creep up for gas costs ... I am sure.
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Old 04-22-2011, 07:17 AM   #38
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I've read several articles about these massive stone structures and you can heat a house with minimal wood, around 1.5 cord for a winter. The down side is they cost a fortune, several years ago the price was in the $15-20,000 range! A wood stove is much less ($2500-3500) and even at $200 or $225 a cord it takes a long time to justify that initial outlay. They are popular in Scandinavian countries.
I have bought a Hearthstone woodstove that has sides and top that are soapstone. The stove heats the soapstone which then retains the heat and releases it over a longer period of time.

Probably not as good as these massive stone structures, but pretty good. I'll also have a solid stone hearth and stone wall behind the woodstove that will absorb, store and then release heat from the stove.
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Old 04-22-2011, 07:17 PM   #39
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I was curious to see if anyone else burns wood on this site and how it compares to gas.
I burn wood a lot, but saving money is not the most important reason.

#1 is that it's SO much more comfortable and pleasant.
#2 is that harvesting my own firewood provides a lot of healthful exercise.
#3 is that it's renewable energy, which I feel strongly about supporting.
#4 is saving money on propane and electricity.

And if it were not for #2, I'm not sure #4 would even apply. Which was the main point of your question, I gather, so no help there - sorry.
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Old 04-22-2011, 10:55 PM   #40
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I have bought a Hearthstone woodstove that has sides and top that are soapstone. The stove heats the soapstone which then retains the heat and releases it over a longer period of time.

Probably not as good as these massive stone structures, but pretty good. I'll also have a solid stone hearth and stone wall behind the woodstove that will absorb, store and then release heat from the stove.
Definitely not the same as a massive stone structure but that is true about soapstone stoves vs cast iron or steel plate stoves. The downside to a soapstone stove is they heat up more slowly than a cast iron or steel plate stove. So if you have a cold house like coming home from work or it is cold in the house from slowly losing heat a cast iron or steel plate stove heats up fast and warms the room/house faster than a soapstone stove would. However, a soapstone stove will radiate heat longer and more evenly than a cast iron or steel plate stove. As with most things in life there are trade offs.
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