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Old 06-08-2009, 03:48 PM   #21
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I really like it. It is small enough to stick in most any pocket. Simple enough for me. Seems to do well with its automatic features. DW just happened to bring in a flower, so some pics attached.

Edit Add: These pics are as uploaded from the camera, no massaging/messing with to imporve or modify in any way.
Thanks, the one complaint people seemed to have with the SD1100 was that the picture quality was extremely poor in low-light conditions. But your 2 pictures don't look bad at all! I love the look of the camera and its tiny size, but I still had doubt about picture quality. But not anymore... It's right back at the top of my list.
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Old 06-08-2009, 05:23 PM   #22
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Here is my situation (what I just put on a Photography Forum elsewhere) if anyone wants to weigh in:

Been reading here for months thank you and I could use some advice, first post, be gentle. Sorry for the length, I was trying to be organized/concise (and failed).

Deciding between a D90 and D5000, and what lens(es)? After months of research, I had planned to buy a D5000. Recently, the D90 has edged out the D5000, but it will be one or the other. Please shoot down my assumptions wherever I’m off track. All responses are welcome, short or long.

Background:
· Had a film SLR (Nikon N2000) w 35-200mm Tokina lens. I shot in Aperture- or Shutter-Priority at least 95% of the time, I can’t remember ever shooting Full Auto or Full Manual. Didn’t use flash often. Never used a tripod (younger and steadier then).
· Bought a digital P&S (Coolpix 800) about 8 years ago. Used AUTO or Scene Modes.
· DSLR’s have reached the point where IQ and features/$ make them within my budget and desirable to us again.
· I shoot mostly outdoors, but rarely “landscapes.” More often a mix of places/sightseeing, boating/action (not high velocity), people/pet/animal pictures, and the occasional close-up (flowers, eBay listing photos).
· I am strictly an amateur who wants to take accurate, sharp (still) pictures. I have been known to enlarge favorites up to 32”x36” when I get a really good/memorable pic.
· I don’t have a firm budget, but I am thinking less than $1,500 for everything: camera body, lens(es), bag, 2 filters and maybe a tripod and/or flash. Less $ is fine too.

Factors that originally led me to narrow it to the D5000 (vs the D90):
· Very good image quality (equal to the D90/D300) at a lower price.
· 19 scene modes has a lot of appeal to us (misplaced?).
· Small, thought my wife would be more comfortable handling it.

What has subsequently led me to favor the D90:
· My wife handled the D90 w/18-105VR and didn’t think it felt “too big” for her at all.
· Kit lens looks like a better choice, certainly more likely as a walkaround if not only lens.
· Seems to be built better, I would expect to keep this camera for 10 years or more. It will be handled with care, but it will be used outdoors including boating.
· I like the D90’s viewfinder, but if I hadn’t seen it, I’d probably have been perfectly happy with the D5000 viewfinder. Only time I would use live view would be for close-ups.
· I like the D90’s larger, hi-res monitor, don’t really need the D5000 “flippy screen.” However, I wear reading glasses so when I don’t have them handy, any monitor will be fuzzy to me anyway (thank goodness for the viewfinder diopter adjustment).
· Concern: Coming from a P&S and never using Full Manual even in my film SLR days, having all those scene modes on the D5000 has some appeal vs having to know all the various settings for most of them with the D90. I will occasionally shoot Sunset, Beach/Snow, Dusk/Dawn, Pet Portrait, Candlelight & Autumn Colors. But I am thinking I could keep the base settings for all these conditions on a laminated card in my bag for the D90 when those situations arise in case I couldn’t remember them.

Lens choice:
· I’d like to have one lens, two at most. So primes are out, number of lenses and cost.
· An 18-55VR lens (D5000 kit lens) alone won’t need my needs. So I was planning on buying a 55-200VR too – reducing the potential savings of a D5000 package. Neither lens alone suits my primary needs (I would rarely shoot as low as 18, nor as high as 200). The Nikon 24-120VR appears to be the best choice on paper, but it’s a little pricey (heavy?) and has not fared that well in reviews I’ve read.
· The 18-105VR may be the best compromise for me. With the larger diameter, I assume IQ will be as good or better than an 18-55VR or 55-200VR – although that’s not always clear from online reviews. It’s confusing to read so many disparate reviews on the various lenses – I wish I knew which sources to listen to. I have seen the 18-55VR and the 18-105VR praised and trashed online!
· I am a little concerned that none of the lenses I am talking about are “good enough” for either camera, but I just can’t spend $1,000’s on lenses.

Other:
· In terms of image quality, is there anything the D5000 will do that the D90 can’t? Or any other downside to the D90 (vs the D5000) aside from higher cost (inferior dust reduction)?
· I know I can buy body only. A D5000 body with the 18-105 lens might be a good compromise for me, but the 18-105 looks like it might overwhelm the smallish D5000.
· The video capability has some appeal (which ruled out most competitors), and I will use it for fun. But I realize it’s very limited and that it’s the same on both cameras.
· I do not have any legacy gear, lenses, etc. – starting from scratch.
· Even with the P&S, I found I could never remember all the features without reviewing the manual. I’d rediscover features after not using the camera for extended periods.
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Old 06-08-2009, 05:23 PM   #23
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The answer to the "Best Camera" is the same as I give for "what is the best handgun for carry", and that is it's the one you will have with you when you need it. The best pictures happen unexpectedly lots of times. So a camera that can be with you all the time is better than a $3000 Nikon D700 and preferably one that is not a like boat anchor hanging around you neck.

This is what I purchased based on a recommendation from a Disney Studios photographer. Great Camera-Great Price.

It takes professional quality pics in almost every condition.

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Old 06-08-2009, 07:00 PM   #24
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Midpack, that's one heck of a thorough thought process and it arrives exactly where I did but I got there because I saw a sale on the D90 with the 18-105 DX VR lens. Nice compromise lens.

A nice comparison to consider:
I currently have a Canon EOS Rebel XTi and two lenses. 18-55 and 55-300. And it is a very capable and high quality image camera. A newer model XSi is 12.2 MP and $849 at B&H. Nice deal.

But as far as the D90 and D5000, those were exactly the conclusions I reached. D90 was a slight winner.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Midpack View Post
Here is my situation (what I just put on a Photography Forum elsewhere) if anyone wants to weigh in:

Been reading here for months thank you and I could use some advice, first post, be gentle. Sorry for the length, I was trying to be organized/concise (and failed).

Deciding between a D90 and D5000, and what lens(es)? After months of research, I had planned to buy a D5000. Recently, the D90 has edged out the D5000, but it will be one or the other. Please shoot down my assumptions wherever I’m off track. All responses are welcome, short or long.

Background:
· Had a film SLR (Nikon N2000) w 35-200mm Tokina lens. I shot in Aperture- or Shutter-Priority at least 95% of the time, I can’t remember ever shooting Full Auto or Full Manual. Didn’t use flash often. Never used a tripod (younger and steadier then).
· Bought a digital P&S (Coolpix 800) about 8 years ago. Used AUTO or Scene Modes.
· DSLR’s have reached the point where IQ and features/$ make them within my budget and desirable to us again.
· I shoot mostly outdoors, but rarely “landscapes.” More often a mix of places/sightseeing, boating/action (not high velocity), people/pet/animal pictures, and the occasional close-up (flowers, eBay listing photos).
· I am strictly an amateur who wants to take accurate, sharp (still) pictures. I have been known to enlarge favorites up to 32”x36” when I get a really good/memorable pic.
· I don’t have a firm budget, but I am thinking less than $1,500 for everything: camera body, lens(es), bag, 2 filters and maybe a tripod and/or flash. Less $ is fine too.

Factors that originally led me to narrow it to the D5000 (vs the D90):
· Very good image quality (equal to the D90/D300) at a lower price.
· 19 scene modes has a lot of appeal to us (misplaced?).
· Small, thought my wife would be more comfortable handling it.

What has subsequently led me to favor the D90:
· My wife handled the D90 w/18-105VR and didn’t think it felt “too big” for her at all.
· Kit lens looks like a better choice, certainly more likely as a walkaround if not only lens.
· Seems to be built better, I would expect to keep this camera for 10 years or more. It will be handled with care, but it will be used outdoors including boating.
· I like the D90’s viewfinder, but if I hadn’t seen it, I’d probably have been perfectly happy with the D5000 viewfinder. Only time I would use live view would be for close-ups.
· I like the D90’s larger, hi-res monitor, don’t really need the D5000 “flippy screen.” However, I wear reading glasses so when I don’t have them handy, any monitor will be fuzzy to me anyway (thank goodness for the viewfinder diopter adjustment).
· Concern: Coming from a P&S and never using Full Manual even in my film SLR days, having all those scene modes on the D5000 has some appeal vs having to know all the various settings for most of them with the D90. I will occasionally shoot Sunset, Beach/Snow, Dusk/Dawn, Pet Portrait, Candlelight & Autumn Colors. But I am thinking I could keep the base settings for all these conditions on a laminated card in my bag for the D90 when those situations arise in case I couldn’t remember them.

Lens choice:
· I’d like to have one lens, two at most. So primes are out, number of lenses and cost.
· An 18-55VR lens (D5000 kit lens) alone won’t need my needs. So I was planning on buying a 55-200VR too – reducing the potential savings of a D5000 package. Neither lens alone suits my primary needs (I would rarely shoot as low as 18, nor as high as 200). The Nikon 24-120VR appears to be the best choice on paper, but it’s a little pricey (heavy?) and has not fared that well in reviews I’ve read.
· The 18-105VR may be the best compromise for me. With the larger diameter, I assume IQ will be as good or better than an 18-55VR or 55-200VR – although that’s not always clear from online reviews. It’s confusing to read so many disparate reviews on the various lenses – I wish I knew which sources to listen to. I have seen the 18-55VR and the 18-105VR praised and trashed online!
· I am a little concerned that none of the lenses I am talking about are “good enough” for either camera, but I just can’t spend $1,000’s on lenses.

Other:
· In terms of image quality, is there anything the D5000 will do that the D90 can’t? Or any other downside to the D90 (vs the D5000) aside from higher cost (inferior dust reduction)?
· I know I can buy body only. A D5000 body with the 18-105 lens might be a good compromise for me, but the 18-105 looks like it might overwhelm the smallish D5000.
· The video capability has some appeal (which ruled out most competitors), and I will use it for fun. But I realize it’s very limited and that it’s the same on both cameras.
· I do not have any legacy gear, lenses, etc. – starting from scratch.
· Even with the P&S, I found I could never remember all the features without reviewing the manual. I’d rediscover features after not using the camera for extended periods.
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Old 06-08-2009, 07:40 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Midpack View Post

Lens choice:
· I’d like to have one lens, two at most. So primes are out, number of lenses and cost.
· An 18-55VR lens (D5000 kit lens) alone won’t need my needs. So I was planning on buying a 55-200VR too – reducing the potential savings of a D5000 package. Neither lens alone suits my primary needs (I would rarely shoot as low as 18, nor as high as 200). The Nikon 24-120VR appears to be the best choice on paper, but it’s a little pricey (heavy?) and has not fared that well in reviews I’ve read.
· The 18-105VR may be the best compromise for me. With the larger diameter, I assume IQ will be as good or better than an 18-55VR or 55-200VR – although that’s not always clear from online reviews. It’s confusing to read so many disparate reviews on the various lenses – I wish I knew which sources to listen to. I have seen the 18-55VR and the 18-105VR praised and trashed online!
· I am a little concerned that none of the lenses I am talking about are “good enough” for either camera, but I just can’t spend $1,000’s on lenses.
Midpack, here's a few things that might be worth considering about the lenses:

1. I believe the D90 and D5000 have a 1.5 crop factor. Say you have an 18mm lens on a film camera. That 18mm lens is going to be more like 27mm on your D90. Crop Factor

2. Save on the body, spend on the glass (the lenses). The lenses is what can make the real difference in a shot. This is advise I've heard but don't follow because lenses are so expensive!

3. Consider the aperture size when your looking at lenses. A larger aperture will give you more bokah. It will also be better at shooting in low light situation. You'll notice that the price skyrockets when that f stop gets down under 2

4. Do the lenses (or cameras) have image stability? That's an important feature when you zoom or use a slow shutter speed.



I haven't really looked into the lenses but if it was me, I'd probably start with the 18-55mm kit lens. And then add on as needed. I think being able to go down to a 18mm focal length would be a nice option for certain landscape shots. The lens is also super cheap and has received good reviews on Amazon - Amazon.com: Nikon 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G ED II AF-S DX Nikkor Zoom Lens: Electronics
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Old 06-08-2009, 08:02 PM   #26
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A technically superior camera will not make your photography any better, just as HD TV fails to improve the quality of the shows. Reasonably good is good enough.

Back in the heyday of film I bought a long telephoto for my SLR. I hardly ever used it. Later, when I got a 28mm wide angle, it somehow stayed on the camera almost full-time. Unless you're taking pictures of a grandchild who plays sports, the long zoom will not be as useful as one might imagine. Wide-angle and low available light capability are much handier, in my opinion.
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Old 06-08-2009, 08:18 PM   #27
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When you happen on something or an event that you want a picture of, the best camera is the one in your hand. Or the one in in your pocket readily available.
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Old 06-08-2009, 08:50 PM   #28
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Thank you so much, see below.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bank5 View Post
Midpack, here's a few things that might be worth considering about the lenses:

1. I believe the D90 and D5000 have a 1.5 crop factor. Say you have an 18mm lens on a film camera. That 18mm lens is going to be more like 27mm on your D90. Crop Factor I am aware of this, thanks.

2. Save on the body, spend on the glass (the lenses). The lenses is what can make the real difference in a shot. This is advise I've heard but don't follow because lenses are so expensive! I agree, but there doesn't seem to be much middle ground. Lenses are either inexpensive, mostly plastic targeting consumers or expensive, glass & metal targeting pros - with little in between. I can't afford (or justify) good glass.

3. Consider the aperture size when your looking at lenses. A larger aperture will give you more bokah. It will also be better at shooting in low light situation. You'll notice that the price skyrockets when that f stop gets down under 2 Yep, see #2 above. And I shoot mostly outdoors and favor deeper DOF, so I don't usually need low f lenses.

4. Do the lenses (or cameras) have image stability? That's an important feature when you zoom or use a slow shutter speed. D90 has in-body VR (image stability). Since I have no equipment, I have no problem buying lenses with VR built in as would be the case with the D5000.



I haven't really looked into the lenses but if it was me, I'd probably start with the 18-55mm kit lens. I know 55mm will not be enough reach for shooting on the water, a principle interest. And then add on as needed. I think being able to go down to a 18mm focal length would be a nice option for certain landscape shots. Landscape is the one type I don't usually shoot. The lens is also super cheap and has received good reviews on Amazon - Amazon.com: Nikon 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G ED II AF-S DX Nikkor Zoom Lens: Electronics
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Old 06-08-2009, 09:51 PM   #29
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^^^
Oops, I got mixed up with your first post - I misread it and thought you said landscape is what you mostly shoot.

Anyway, it seems like you've really done your research and know your stuff. I'm sure you'll be happy with whatever you decide. Let us know what you pick and have fun shooting!
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Old 06-09-2009, 12:14 AM   #30
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DW and I wanted a small camera with better a better zoom range than we'd had previously. We've been VERY pleased with our Canon PowerShot SX200IS 12 MP Digital Camera with 12x Wide Angle Optical Image Stabilized Zoom and 3.0-inch LCD. Many seem to prefer the competing Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS3 10MP Digital Camera with 12x Wide Angle MEGA Optical Image Stabilized Zoom and 3 inch LCD.
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Old 06-13-2009, 03:39 AM   #31
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i use a nikon d300 and my wife a d80...we also have a great little point and shoot the canon sd880........ a 35 year old nikon fe we have with velvia 50 film is better then all our digitals so dont get to wrapped up in the camera...very little is the camera...its all about a good eye, good lighting and good skills....
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