Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Camping food
Old 04-22-2010, 11:24 PM   #1
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 920
Camping food

We're definitely not "knife and a loincloth" hardcore campers, but we're also not lined up in little driveways at a designated campsite. We do dispersed, which has so much opportunity in the lovely and geographically diverse state of Arizona, but are pretty well limited by how far from our vehicle we can waddle with a cooler full of beer.

That said... looking for new ideas for camping food. Prefer nothing that needs to sit on a grate like steaks or burgers, easier something that can be held or suspended over a fire.

Hot dogs are obvious, and we've recently discovered how perfect quesadillas are since can put precooked slices in little foil packets.

Any other ideas from you wise ones?
__________________

__________________
tuixiu is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 04-22-2010, 11:33 PM   #2
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
audreyh1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Rio Grande Valley
Posts: 16,446
You can cook a huge amount of stuff in foil packets. The Reynolds site has a ton of recipes (search recipes for them): Cooking, Baking and Cleanup Tips and Timesavers

Audrey

P.S. Glad I don't have your challenge. I love having a 14 cu. ft. fridge/freezer wherever I camp! (Ice cream!!!!!)
__________________

__________________
Well, I thought I was retired. But it seems that now I'm working as a travel agent instead!
audreyh1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2010, 11:58 PM   #3
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Leonidas's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Where the stars at night are big and bright
Posts: 2,847
I second the packet cooking. It's great during hunting season, all my veggies are prepared at home in packets and left in the cooler until it's time to cook. But we use a grill for meats and not an open fire. And the way we do fire time would be tough to add cooking in as well. I mean, you need one hand to hold your beer, scotch or whatever, and the other hand to gesticulate while lying recounting your adventures.

I guess if I had to do it the way you're suggesting, I would do something like kebobs. Make everything small, almost as if you were doing fondue, so it would cook quicker.
__________________
There is no pleasure in having nothing to do; the fun is having lots to do and not doing it. - Andrew Jackson
Leonidas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2010, 01:17 AM   #4
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 193
You can do a lot of damage with one of those BBQ contraptions designed to cook fish - it basically looks like a rectangular cage with a handle. Anything that cooks quickly and is at least an inch or so in one dimension (or can be cut/sliced to that size) can go over the fire in one of these.

Quesadillas actually work like magic in one of these (and flipping is pretty brainless). Pizza (already cooked and stored in the cooler) reheats well, Veggie patties, Pre-cut peppers/onions (spray with a little oil first). Pretty much anything that's already pre-cooked or doesn't need to be fully-cooked will work. Stay away from poultry or other meats that need to be properly cooked for any over-the-campfire cooking
__________________
skyline is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2010, 08:19 AM   #5
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
RonBoyd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Denver, Colorado
Posts: 5,280
Of course, if you don't want to cook at all, nothing tastes better than this (and good for you too):

Combine one 15 oz. can of drained cannellini beans (white navy beans) with a 5 oz. can of high quality olive-oil packed tuna. (Do not use water-packed.) Add some chopped red onion and season with a little sage (rosemary and basil works well also). Add more extra-virgin olive oil as desired. To add crunch, eat with something like Triscuits or Bagel Chips.

This recipe is a generous two-portion. Double for four, etc.

Okay, if you must cook:

Combine cannelini beans (drained or not, you decide) with extra-virgin olive oil and small (or chopped) shrimp, minced garlic, and thyme leaves. Cook, stirring, until shrimp just turn pink (minute or so). Garnish with more olive oil.

Both of these recipes are "easy clean-up after" type of meals. (And, to be honest, I serve them at home as often as I do on the road.)
__________________
"It's tough to make predictions, especially when it involves the future." ~Attributed to many
"In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. But, in practice, there is." ~(perhaps by) Yogi Berra
"Those who have knowledge, don't predict. Those who predict, don't have knowledge."~ Lau tzu
RonBoyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2010, 10:50 AM   #6
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 920
Thanks all.

I'm especially intrigued with use of the fish cooker, as I've got one for our grill at home but never thought to take it camping. We could do burgers and stuff with that no problem.
__________________
tuixiu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2010, 10:54 AM   #7
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,038
Take a look at foil packs. Did this often in Scouts.
Foil Cooking
__________________
In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they are not.
Lazarus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2010, 11:47 AM   #8
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 7,526
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lazarus View Post
Take a look at foil packs. Did this often in Scouts.
Foil Cooking
We also did foil packs all the time in the scouts. A hunk of meat (usually ground beef), big chunks of veggies (carrots, potatoes), maybe a chunk of cheese in there. Salt, pepper. Mmmmmm... almost tastes like brunswick stew when you are done. I imagine you could use an infinite variety of ingredients and combination of meats and veggies.

The hardest part is leaving it in the coals for long enough for it to fully cook, then pull it out and leave it sitting around for long enough to cool down, all the while smelling this delicious smell of roasting meat and veggies. Painfully good!
__________________
Retired in 2013 at age 33. Keeping busy reading, blogging, relaxing, gaming, and enjoying the outdoors with my wife and 3 kids (5, 11, and 12).
FUEGO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2010, 11:51 AM   #9
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 920
Pretty neat. I bet I could do chicken curry over rice in one of those, and probably jambalaya if it's sausage/chicken style.
__________________
tuixiu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2010, 12:02 PM   #10
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
brewer12345's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 16,391
One other thought: If you get your hands on a super lightweight aluminum camping griddle (I bough one that is maybe 3# at Cabela's), you can saute, fry eggs, etc.
__________________
"There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest have to pee on the electric fence for themselves."



- Will Rogers
brewer12345 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2010, 12:22 PM   #11
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 7,526
I have always wanted to try putting cans of stuff into the coals and letting it heat up right in the can (after opening slightly of course). Definitely nothing with a plastic liner inside the can, like some acidic foods have. Soup, corn, beans, etc might work.
__________________
Retired in 2013 at age 33. Keeping busy reading, blogging, relaxing, gaming, and enjoying the outdoors with my wife and 3 kids (5, 11, and 12).
FUEGO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2010, 12:32 PM   #12
Moderator
ziggy29's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 15,612
Quote:
Originally Posted by FUEGO View Post
I have always wanted to try putting cans of stuff into the coals and letting it heat up right in the can (after opening slightly of course). Definitely nothing with a plastic liner inside the can, like some acidic foods have. Soup, corn, beans, etc might work.
Yeah, that "opening slightly" thing is slightly important....

StateMaster - Encyclopedia: MythBusters (season 4)

Quote:
The MythBusters tested whether putting the following items on a stove will cause an explosion that could kill a person…

... a can of beans -- confirmed -- The cans of beans tested exploded with force proportional to the size of the can. Larger cans explode more violently than smaller cans, especially since large cans do not have a weakened pop-open top, but the build team concluded that any can of beans on a stove is potentially lethal.
__________________
"Hey, for every ten dollars, that's another hour that I have to be in the work place. That's an hour of my life. And my life is a very finite thing. I have only 'x' number of hours left before I'm dead. So how do I want to use these hours of my life? Do I want to use them just spending it on more crap and more stuff, or do I want to start getting a handle on it and using my life more intelligently?" -- Joe Dominguez (1938 - 1997)

RIP to Reemy, my avatar dog (2003 - 9/16/2017)
ziggy29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2010, 12:33 PM   #13
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
IndependentlyPoor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Austin
Posts: 1,142
If you are lugging ice chests from a car to a camping spot (as opposed to hard-core backpacking) you can use another trick from the Boy Scouts. Take along a container of refrigerated biscuit dough. You'll probably have to use it the first morning, but you can have freshly baked bread with almost no work. Just mold the biscuit dough into a fat snake and wrap it around a trimmed green branch. Angle the branch over you campfire, and turn it as needed.

I think we also did this with powdered biscuit dough, but I can't remember exactly.
__________________
Start by admitting
from cradle to tomb
it isn't that long a stay.
IndependentlyPoor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2010, 12:40 PM   #14
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: North of Montana
Posts: 2,753
Here's a book whose recipes could be adapted to a campfire (most are tinfoil wrapped). You won't have to stop at restaurants en route either.
__________________
There are two kinds of people in the world: those who can extrapolate conclusions from insufficient data and ..
kumquat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2010, 01:49 PM   #15
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,038
The usual foil pack that we did used a layer of cabbage nearest the foil. (keeps the meat from burning.) Layer of potato slices. Layer of sliced carrots and onions. Sometimes a little corn. Ground beef. (Should be lean) then add the same layers on the other side of the meat.
Then roll up the foil pack at one end. Put a little water or an ice cube if you are using it later for moisture. Seal it up and cook it. I have frozen these for use a few hours after getting to camp.
__________________

__________________
In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they are not.
Lazarus is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Food, Inc. Sarah in SC Health and Early Retirement 15 08-12-2009 11:34 AM
Now This is Camping! tgotch Other topics 14 11-07-2007 12:54 PM
Trip Report: Washington State Camping TromboneAl Life after FIRE 21 08-23-2006 12:52 PM
Camping haha Other topics 13 07-11-2006 10:30 AM
Food! yakers Other topics 47 06-18-2005 01:24 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:02 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.