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Old 08-06-2014, 10:32 AM   #21
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+1 and guaranteed to stay sharp for life
+2 Love my Cutco knives. I've had the same set for over 20 years!
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Old 08-06-2014, 01:53 PM   #22
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I noticed in today's paper that Cutco is now opening retail stores in addition to their door-to-door selling model.

I bought 2 Cutcos about 25 years ago when the daughter of a friend sold them as a summer job during college. Still have them, but I don't really like serrated knives for general use. I do, however, love using them on ripe tomatoes in the summer.
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Old 08-12-2014, 03:59 PM   #23
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bUU, if you have both high end and low end, I would love to hear your thoughts.
I've used the low end knives twice so far - both times the second largest of the four, comparing it to a slightly longer (but obviously broader) Kyrocera chef's knife. I'm pleased with the low end knife. I miss the breadth a little bit (the narrower knife means I have to cut a bit slower because I cannot run the knife as far along my finger to guide it), but not much.

It's a bit unfair, perhaps, comparing a brand new knife to one that is used, but ceramic knives are supposed to stay sharp a long time, and we've had the Kyrocera knife only a year or two. For what I was doing - cutting cucumbers and bell peppers - the low end knife felts better in my hand and seemed to work through the vegetables more efficiently.

Of course, for tomatoes and onions, I still plan on going to the Kyrocera micro-serrated knife first.
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Old 08-12-2014, 07:28 PM   #24
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Do knives ever reach a point where they just won't hold an edge? We have several expensive (to us) Henckels knives. They've been great, but after 20 years they don't seem to hold an edge like they used to when we sharpen them (with our Chef's Choice).
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Old 08-12-2014, 08:01 PM   #25
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Do knives ever reach a point where they just won't hold an edge? We have several expensive (to us) Henckels knives. They've been great, but after 20 years they don't seem to hold an edge like they used to when we sharpen them (with our Chef's Choice).
I'm not an expert, but I think at that point they benefit from a professional sharpening. There is an edge that a pro puts on, and at home you are sort of 'touching it up'. But eventually that edge is gone, and needs to be re-shaped before 'touching it up' works as well as it used to.

I don't think it costs much for a pro sharpening, we should get our older knives done and see if it helps.

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Old 08-12-2014, 08:47 PM   #26
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There are actually two edges on a cutting instrument. The touch up you do is called honing. Look in Google images for examples. Microscopic details are very interesting.

Eventually you need a professional sharpening.
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Old 08-13-2014, 03:58 AM   #27
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I use the sharpening method I mentioned before, taught by Murray Carter in his dvd Sharpening Instruction - DVD - Carter Cutlery Co..

It is not hard to learn and for us a sharpening lasts about 9 months. We use the knives every day, a lot.

This method does put the double angle edge on. We've never sent our knives out for sharpening and expect that we never will.

I have tried many different sharpening methods and tools and the above is the best we've found.

Regarding knives not holding an edge any more, it's possible that the knife has a hard temper near the edge and a softer core for toughness. (I'm a metallurgist.) That might be the reason you see the shorter life now. What I would do is sharpen the knife properly (I'd do it myself.) and see how it lasts.

If you are going to send your knives out for sharpening I suggest paying the premium to get at least a few done by Murray Carter. He will sharpen them "scary sharp" without damaging the edge. Other paid sharpening people sometimes use a fine belt sander which can heat the edge and cause it to lose it's temper. So be careful if you send them out.
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Old 08-13-2014, 08:21 AM   #28
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There are actually two edges on a cutting instrument. The touch up you do is called honing. Look in Google images for examples. Microscopic details are very interesting.

Eventually you need a professional sharpening.
We had three of them sharpened by a pro, but they still didn't hold an edge for long (weeks). We bought a Henckels Santoku about 10 years ago and it holds it's edge longer even though we use it most. The other knives are more than 25 years old, and we use them almost daily, maybe it's time...
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Old 08-13-2014, 11:32 AM   #29
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I use the sharpening method I mentioned before, taught by Murray Carter in his dvd Sharpening Instruction - DVD - Carter Cutlery Co..

It is not hard to learn and for us a sharpening lasts about 9 months. We use the knives every day, a lot.

This method does put the double angle edge on. We've never sent our knives out for sharpening and expect that we never will.

I have tried many different sharpening methods and tools and the above is the best we've found.

Regarding knives not holding an edge any more, it's possible that the knife has a hard temper near the edge and a softer core for toughness. (I'm a metallurgist.) That might be the reason you see the shorter life now. What I would do is sharpen the knife properly (I'd do it myself.) and see how it lasts.

If you are going to send your knives out for sharpening I suggest paying the premium to get at least a few done by Murray Carter. He will sharpen them "scary sharp" without damaging the edge. Other paid sharpening people sometimes use a fine belt sander which can heat the edge and cause it to lose it's temper. So be careful if you send them out.

Murray Carter IS the man.
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