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Old 01-12-2015, 01:35 AM   #41
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That's obscene. Did you have to throw up time to time to taste more food?

http://youtu.be/Zx0ME65y72E

Sorry, this is the one that reflects the pause before the 12th course.


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Old 01-12-2015, 01:38 AM   #42
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About once a month or so, friends and I will hit up a nice restaurant in San Francisco, and it probably averages about $75 to $100 per person by the time we count appetizers, entree, dessert, and coffee. My friends are really into wine and they always bring a very nice bottle, so although we do have to pay for corkage, we're not actually spending big bucks on wine from the restaurant.

The most expensive meal I've had was probably at Cyrus in Healdsburg, CA. They've since closed, but at the time we visited, I believe they had two Michelin stars. That was truly a "destination" meal, and was incredible. I think my portion was around $120, but can't remember for sure. It was definitely worth it, but being so extravagant, isn't something I would do frequently. Maybe once a year or so.

Food aside, the most expensive bottle of wine I've probably brought to a dinner was around $350. The same good friend of mine had just gotten a new job, so to celebrate I brought the wine that time, and found an older vintage of Silver Oak (Napa cab). Again, not something I'd do often, but for a special occasion, it was fun for us to share that.

Couldn't eat or drink that way all the time. But it's fun to inject a nice dinner once a month or so into an otherwise pedestian course of fast food and mac 'n cheese
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Old 01-12-2015, 06:21 AM   #43
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This thread reminds me of the first time my wife and I went to Europe together, about 1985. My wife had gone to our local credit union and withdrawn $300 and converted it to American Express Travelers Cheques denominated in French francs. There was another young couple seated next to us on our plane who had visited Paris before. As part of our conversation I asked roughly what a nice dinner in Paris cost. They responded with an amount of francs that was about what we had received from the bank. I then asked, you mean it costs $300 for a nice dinner in Paris?

As it turns out, they meant about $30, and the clerk at our local credit union had slipped a digit when doing the conversion and given us only $30 worth of francs. When we arrived in Paris, we barely had enough for a cab from the airport to our hotel and had to walk around a bit to find a restaurant that accepted credit cards so we could have dinner.

Not sure if you heard this one, but recently there was a story of someone having dinner at a restaurant the they chose a bottle of wine that the waiter had said was 'Thirty seven fifty". They were shocked when they got their tab and the wine was $3,750.00 and not $37.50. They paid. I'm not sure that i would have.

http://www.mix96live.com/index.php/c...t-costs-37-50/
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Old 01-12-2015, 06:50 AM   #44
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DW and I enjoy dining out, this is one area where we are definitely not frugal. Nonetheless, even our most extravagant meal can't compare with what I saw while working. In my experience the truly expensive meals are those where the tab is picked up by business.

Do meals on expense account qualify? How about meals someone else paid for?
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Old 01-12-2015, 06:57 AM   #45
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I'm in the same boat as Midpack. DW and I have eaten a couple of times at the Inn at Little Washington (~$300/head) and have hit similar stratospheric costs in NYC and Europe (years ago). We don't bother with $300+ three star restaurants anymore but we will occasionally head out to $100+ restaurants if they are really good. We tend to skimp on the wine. I can't appreciate $100+ bottles but I can appreciate world class meals. We have already made it three times to Roses Luxury, a nearby restaurant rated as the 2014 best new restaurant in the US by Bon Appetit. But it was a frugal $100 each with tip and incredibly good.
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Old 01-12-2015, 07:12 AM   #46
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Twice we spent about $100 for two and both were gift certificates. As a wedding present, DH and I received a gift certificate for Chez Panisse in Berkeley. That was back in the 80s--it was an excellent meal. About 5 years ago we went to the Melting Pot--again on a gift certificate. We occasionally have a glass of wine or a cocktail in a restaurant, but to us it seems like a waste of money due to the huge mark up for alcohol in restaurants.

$25 per person for an entree is about the most we'll tolerate to spend on people. One rare occasion last year we treated a friend and a relative to a weekend trip and somewhat high end meal but that was a special occasion.


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Old 01-12-2015, 07:41 AM   #47
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So, the question: What's the most you've ever paid for a restaurant meal?
I thought the OP was clear, not expense account meals or paid for by others.
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Old 01-12-2015, 07:49 AM   #48
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One of my most expensive meals that I paid for was around $700.00 for 4 people. The other couple ordered everything......and I paid! DW and I have favorite chinese, italian and mexican restaurants where our average bill is about $25.00.....including tip. We avoid booze except when with others.....that saves us a bunch. And, we really like our "cheap" meals, love the food, leave 20%+ tips and are always welcomed back. .....most times we leave tips in cash......just get reward points for the bill, not the tax or tip. Overall, we eat out twice a week, average $200 a month at restaurants.
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Old 01-12-2015, 07:58 AM   #49
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There are so many good restaurants everywhere with innovative chefs who have a passion for cooking that don't charge premium prices for great food that no one " has" to spend megabucks for fine food anymore.

Before this era, way back when French haute cuisine was the only game in town, DH and I celebrated our first two anniversaries at French restaurants in Chicago. I can't remember the price (it was 40 years ago) but the meals and wine were expensive and we were counting pennies being newlyweds and DH being back in school after the Army. Walking home from the second anniversary celebration back to our apartment in a yet-to-be-gentrified city neighborhood, DH said he felt sick and a block later deposited his expensive meal in a corner garbage can.

It was a looong time before we spent a lot of money on a restaurant meal again, and by then much less expensive Italian food beyond pizza and spaghetti had taken over.
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Old 01-12-2015, 08:40 AM   #50
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There are so many good restaurants everywhere with innovative chefs who have a passion for cooking that don't charge premium prices for great food that no one " has" to spend megabucks for fine food anymore.
+1

I'm thinking if our portfolio ever gets to stupid high territory, we might start trying more $50+ per meal restaurants just to verify.

In the past, after trying expensive restaurants, the response is usually "yeah, that was good, but not THAT good". Perhaps our taste buds are gustationally challenged.
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Old 01-12-2015, 08:55 AM   #51
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The most expensive was an anniversary meal with wine and dessert at a restaurant that was recommended to us in Nelson BC. A pretentious place as it turned out. The food was good but not great and my DH didn't want me to even see the bill as he new I would be horrified. It was around $200. We usually have dinner out once or twice a month and $80 for two would be on the higher end. I guess I can go up to $100 for two with drinks before I start to squirm. We have an almost weekly breakfast date that runs $28 to $36 and is well worth it! Mostly we eat extremely well at home. Many is the time we've eaten out and it compared poorly to meals we make for ourselves.
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Old 01-12-2015, 09:08 AM   #52
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Our annual spending for dining out is rather low as we tend to prefer preparing a good meal at home. We did a couple of higher end meals this last year, one was a great meal, but would not have done it without coupon savings, that one went just over $100 all in. And an $80 steak house dinner, good but not great. Finding that noon lunches at our favorite restaurants are a much cheaper way to enjoy, in some cases prices are about 30% lower for same food. And the bar if far less crowded

DW and I have this on the to do list for this next summer, a road trip to Milwaukee’s Public Market & St Paul Fish Company for a highfalutin "Home of the World Famous $13.95 Lobster Dinner!" Of course, I expect out total bill will go a bit higher, with a few pounds of scallops packed in ice for the drive back home.
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Old 01-12-2015, 09:12 AM   #53
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The most we've spent was almost $100 per person, but only a couple of times that I can remember and only because someone else chose the restaurant. Our tastes tend toward the local Mexican place where we get a good meal + tip for under $25 total for two.

We aren't drinkers and always have just water with our meals, even at home. But usually when we go out with other couples we end up splitting the bill, so we subsidize our companions a bit. But we just chalk that up to the cost of socializing. The only time I can recall refusing to do an even split was with a large group of players/family from a basketball team DD played on. We were meeting at a hotel for a weekend tournament and when we got there found out that everyone else was at a restaurant next door. The four of us had eaten sandwiches in the car so we didn't need a big dinner, but joined the group to socialize rather than sit in the hotel. The place had a soup and salad special for $8. DH and I split one special, the two girls split another (i.e. each of us had either soup or a salad). Water to drink. Everyone else was having entrees, drinks, some desserts. When the bill came the team mom announced it was $20 each-- so $80 for our two soup&salad specials?? I told her no, we didn't order that much so I was only paying half. She acted like that was a big imposition on everyone else, but I felt that $40 for a $16 ticket was plenty.


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Old 01-12-2015, 09:38 AM   #54
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I thought the OP was clear, not expense account meals or paid for by others.
I saw that, but also read some posts about meals observed, not "paid for by themselves". No matter..

My most expensive meal was one I couldn't afford, an unreimbursed business expense. Cost me a week's salary. As a meal, easily the most expensive. As a learning experience, I probably got off well.
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Old 01-12-2015, 09:50 AM   #55
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Our annual spending for dining out is rather low as we tend to prefer preparing a good meal at home.....
+1

Not only are there very good, reasonably priced restaurants today, those of us who like to cook can buy almost any ingredient, fresh, without too much trouble, and create pretty good meals on our own. This thread makes me feel old, but I can remember needing cilantro for a recipe back in the day, and the only option was in the spice rack, dried, at $5 an ounce (did it taste like cilantro? No). Yesterday DH brought fresh cilantro home from Aldi, 50 cents for the bunch.
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Old 01-12-2015, 10:03 AM   #56
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In October DH and I were on vacation in Hilton Head, SC with my sister and BIL. They had rented a condo and offered us the second bedroom and bath, so we stayed for free.

DH and I had planned to pay for a nice dinner in appreciation for them inviting us so we offered to treat on our first night there. It was a lovely seafood place and we had a great time. DH and I don't drink but my sister had a glass of wine. The total for the 4 of us was $175 and that included the tip. My sister and BIL were surprised and very appreciative.

That's a lot more than DH and I usually spend out. We don't eat out often but when we do it's usually under $60 for both of us.
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Old 01-12-2015, 10:36 AM   #57
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Wife (then girlfriend) took me to Melisse in LA when I finished grad school in 2001. I'm not sure of the total cost but probably around $300 for both of us. We got free champagne because we knew the manager.

Normally we prefer relatively cheap (but good) ethnic restaurants (maybe $10-15 per dish/entree), or sushi and even some chain places (like CPK although we don't often eat there).
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Old 01-12-2015, 10:39 AM   #58
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Back in 2007 we were celebrating our 30th anniversary in Montreal when the concierge at our hotel recommended "Gibbys" steakhouse in old Montreal. Great atmosphere and excellent food. The bill came to $350 for food and drinks for the two of us including tip.

Now that I'm retired we occasionally splurge on a nice dinner in Boston's north end and spent about $150 for the two of us.

Back in the corporate world I've been to dinners with customers where the bill exceeded $4000 for a party of 8. It was way over the top and I avoided these dinners whenever I could because I did not enjoy the company of most of the corporate folks and I felt it was a waste of money and totally unnecessary. When customers visited my plant I had lunch brought in from our excellent cafeteria
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Old 01-12-2015, 11:18 AM   #59
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On the trip I was on with the huge bill a couple of us actually started skipping dinners with the sales staff and going to a Pizza Hut salad bar. We just couldn't sit all day in meetings and then have 3+ course meals late at night like that multiple nights in a row (though none of the other bills were nearly that large).

We enjoy fine dining (our definition is about $100 for two, $70 with 2 for 1 entree coupon ). But we enjoy KFC, cheap Chinese & Mexican, and ramen cooked at home just as much. We find that often they taste just as good as the "fine" restaurant food which are many times more expensive. It depends how hungry we are at the time, and what kind of eating mood we were at.
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Old 01-12-2015, 11:20 AM   #60
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This thread reminds me. Quite often when we dine at a fine restaurant, waiter will ask what is the occasion. My favorite answer is "hunger."
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