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Old 06-05-2011, 09:28 PM   #41
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I could not wait to learn cursive writing in school. It seemed like such a big deal to me! I wanted to learn it, since that how the grown ups wrote.
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Old 06-05-2011, 09:35 PM   #42
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I think that's why our little left-handed one learned to type when she was in 2nd grade. Plenty of software and tutoring programs for it, and she really got into it.
My son isn't left handed, but one positive side effect of his dysgraphia was that he started regularly keyboarding work when he was 7. Ten years later he is a fast typist and rarely makes mistakes. That will probably serve him better in the work world at some point than being able to neatly write.
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Old 06-05-2011, 09:42 PM   #43
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I'm a dominant left-hander, so imagine me as a child trying to "crook" my left hand into a most uncomfortable curled position, keeping the book slanted the same way as the right-handers (no the nuns didn't allow me to tilt my book the "other way"), AND not smear the fresh ink onto my white uniform blouse sleeve or edge of my hand.
I can imagine that. I'm a dominant right-hander, but my mother was left-handed and taught me to write and draw with my left hand before I started school. When I got to school, though, I had to place the paper just as all the right-handers did, with the consequence that my left hand always rubbed across what I just wrote. I really should have learned to write with my right hand, but I never got around to it. And now, I don't need to write anything besides my signature, so it doesn't really matter.
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Old 06-05-2011, 10:49 PM   #44
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The kids know they can "write" perfectly in cursive on their computers just by changing the font.

Interestingly, now that there are computer fonts that resemble calligraphy, people don't want real calligraphy that looks too perfect.
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Old 06-06-2011, 07:49 AM   #45
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Reading GregLee's post about writing left handed vs right handed, I always wondered why left handers made it look so difficult. Left handers I have seen writing seem to always crook their arm over the top of the paper, make it look like they're are writing upside down and then end up with the butt of their hand dragging over what they have written. It would seem like a mirror image of a right hander would be a more normal method, but I've never seen a lefty write like that. It's always looks like they are writing upside down.
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Old 06-06-2011, 08:57 AM   #46
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I always wondered why left handers made it look so difficult. ... It would seem like a mirror image of a right hander would be a more normal method, but I've never seen a lefty write like that. It's always looks like they are writing upside down.
Since you read my post, now you know why, at least in my case. I have a very clear recollection of a teacher walking up and down the aisles of seats as students practiced their writing, making sure the papers' position on the desk was exactly the same for all. Dumb, but that's what she did.
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Old 06-06-2011, 11:05 AM   #47
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Reading GregLee's post about writing left handed vs right handed, I always wondered why left handers made it look so difficult. Left handers I have seen writing seem to always crook their arm over the top of the paper, make it look like they're are writing upside down and then end up with the butt of their hand dragging over what they have written. It would seem like a mirror image of a right hander would be a more normal method, but I've never seen a lefty write like that. It's always looks like they are writing upside down.
I'm a left-hander and used to write that way, but using fountain pens, after smudging my writing and ending up with ink all over my left hand, I learned fast that it's not the way to go. I don't remember whether my teachers coaxed me, or whether I did it on my own, but I learned to write left-handed with my hand below the pen, and not curved over it. This approach has worked well for me ever since.
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Old 06-06-2011, 11:21 AM   #48
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DH is lefthanded with perfect penmanship (he does calligraphy, too). He said he writes with his hand in that awkward position first because his hand would otherwise cover what he's just written and it interrupts a train of thought, and also because his hand would smear the ink, as Major Tom says. He doesn't like writing with his hand below the line of writing because he doesn't like "pushing" the pen across the paper.
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Old 06-06-2011, 12:08 PM   #49
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Ironic that this lament is coming from a physician...
Isn't writing illegibly one of the final courses taught in med school, along with how to solicit stock tips from your patients
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Old 06-06-2011, 12:28 PM   #50
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I have kept a handwritten personal daily journal since January 1, 1975. After reading this thread I checked back. I used cursive through December 31, 1989. On January 1, 1990, I began using block printing, all caps. I made no notation in my journal at the time as to why I changed. This was several years after I started using a PC at work, so I assume I thought my cursive had deteriorated by then, although, now, I really can't tell much difference between 1975 and 1989 writing. Now, I use cursive only for my signature. I will always handwrite my journal because I think handwriting reveals an important part of your personality.
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Old 06-06-2011, 04:21 PM   #51
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Reading GregLee's post about writing left handed vs right handed, I always wondered why left handers made it look so difficult. Left handers I have seen writing seem to always crook their arm over the top of the paper, make it look like they're are writing upside down and then end up with the butt of their hand dragging over what they have written. It would seem like a mirror image of a right hander would be a more normal method, but I've never seen a lefty write like that. It's always looks like they are writing upside down.
From what I was told, the teachers back in the day were unable to flip the writing around in their mind to teach it to a lefty. As a result we lefties were taught to write upside down. I did that for a very long time then figured if my writing is illegible either way, then I'll just write like the rest of the people with my elbow at my side and wrist straight. Now I only write short annotations on my paperwork and most long writing is done on a computer.
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Old 06-06-2011, 04:50 PM   #52
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... I really can't tell much difference between 1975 and 1989 writing.
I noticed that my father's handwriting (on his checks & checkbook) deteriorated dramatically from early onset of Alzheimer's. The month before he ended up in the hospital seemed clearly the worst, although I could be spinning my own hindsight on the data.

My block-printing handwriting hasn't changed significantly in over 30 years.
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Old 06-06-2011, 10:24 PM   #53
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My son isn't left handed, but one positive side effect of his dysgraphia was that he started regularly keyboarding work when he was 7. Ten years later he is a fast typist and rarely makes mistakes. That will probably serve him better in the work world at some point than being able to neatly write.
The fast typing probably will serve him better. One of the most practical and useful classes I took in high school was typing.

I'm not farsighted; I only took the class because I knew they couldn't make me buy a typewriter and therefore couldn't assign homework in that class, and I was one of two guys in a classroom full of girls.
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