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Desktop Power Supply Died
Old 05-14-2015, 05:11 PM   #1
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Desktop Power Supply Died

So, I was using my desktop when it suddenly turned off. When I tried turning on again, I hear this pop noise, then the smell of something burning.

It looks like the power supply gave up. I have a power supply (PSU) tester, so took out the PSU and tested and that does show no good.

Hopefully, that is the only thing which is wrong.

A good thing I have a laptop (which I'm using now) and hooked that up to my desktop's monitor, keyboard and mouse.

Time to order a new PSU.
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Old 05-14-2015, 05:44 PM   #2
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Hope that's all it took out. About ten years ago I had a two year old emachine and the power supply went bad, took out the motherboard.

And another time, on a five year old emachine, a power supply died and once replaced, everything was fine.

Good luck!!
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Old 05-14-2015, 05:47 PM   #3
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I've been lucky, never had one give out.

Nowadays machines are so cheap, thats nearly an excuse to build a new 8++ core machine.
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Old 05-14-2015, 06:14 PM   #4
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If you are not in a hurry the Corsair 430w keeps going on sale for $40 with a $20 rebate. Check slickdeals.net. *$20 final price
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Old 05-14-2015, 07:13 PM   #5
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I ended up ordering a 750W PSU and a new PSU tester (that fits 24 pin). Price about $55 for the PSU and $7 for the test.

That extra giddy up in power might be overkill for my system, but was only $10 more than a 550W of the same brand.

Amazon.com: Sentey® Power Supply 750w 80 Plus Bronze - Mbp750-hs Metal Blade Power 750 Watts / 120mm Sleeve Bearing Fan / Autoswitching 100-240 Voltage / Active PFC / Single +12v Rail / Certified Power Cord / 5 Years Warranty Computer Power Supply -

I know what I'll be doing come Saturday
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Old 05-14-2015, 08:18 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by easysurfer View Post
I ended up ordering a 750W PSU and a new PSU tester (that fits 24 pin). Price about $55 for the PSU and $7 for the test.

That extra giddy up in power might be overkill for my system, but was only $10 more than a 550W of the same brand. ...
550W!!! 750W!!!!!

What do you with all that power?

I just 2x checked my laptop, and my previous laptop. 21 watts. Including display turned all the way up (18W if dimmed a bit). That's more than 25 times a laptop.

-ERD50
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Old 05-14-2015, 08:50 PM   #7
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550W!!! 750W!!!!!

What do you with all that power?

I just 2x checked my laptop, and my previous laptop. 21 watts. Including display turned all the way up (18W if dimmed a bit). That's more than 25 times a laptop.

-ERD50
On gaming desktops you can put in super duper graphics cards that do take a lot of power(250 watts or more). These have mutiple graphic processors on the board.
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Old 05-14-2015, 09:29 PM   #8
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I use a graphics card. Not a super duper one, but still.
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Old 05-15-2015, 05:30 AM   #9
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Power supply efficiency is at is greatest when it properly loaded. If you oversize it you are wasting money on the purchase and on the ongoing energy cost.

The Corsair 430w I referenced is at maximum efficiency at 50% load and this is the point before the fan starts to increase speed (sound) to keep up with cooling demands.

CX430 — 80 PLUS® Bronze Certified Power Supply

Looking at one of the higher CX series it appears that it has the same 50% load sweet spot.
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Old 05-15-2015, 07:16 AM   #10
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Looks like I'll have to add some flashing neon lights or a toaster
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Old 05-15-2015, 08:16 AM   #11
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Power supply efficiency is at is greatest when it properly loaded. If you oversize it you are wasting money on the purchase and on the ongoing energy cost.

The Corsair 430w I referenced is at maximum efficiency at 50% load and this is the point before the fan starts to increase speed (sound) to keep up with cooling demands.

CX430 — 80 PLUS® Bronze Certified Power Supply

Looking at one of the higher CX series it appears that it has the same 50% load sweet spot.

You convinced me to get less oomph . I ordered the 550W and will return the 750W. Looks like no flashing neon lights for me
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Old 05-15-2015, 08:24 AM   #12
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Here's a sizing tool for estimating your wattage needs

Power Supply Calculator - The most accurate PC wattage calculator
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Old 05-15-2015, 08:45 AM   #13
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I have been the sole IT person for the company I am with for the past 11 years. Most standard desktop computers are 250 to 350 watt power supplies. We have never had a problem adding a lower end video card. Most the computers are on a 220-330w battery backup which includes one or two 23-24" monitors. For some reason people like to go overkill on power supplies and RAM. I have measured a standard Dell desktop at less than 100w while loading the CPU, Prime 95 and Kill-A-Watt.

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Here's a sizing tool for estimating your wattage needs

Power Supply Calculator - The most accurate PC wattage calculator
Seems to be pretty spot on. I built out what I would consider standard for our Dell machines and it was coming in between 200-250w recommend power supply.
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Old 05-15-2015, 11:26 AM   #14
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On gaming desktops you can put in super duper graphics cards that do take a lot of power(250 watts or more). These have mutiple graphic processors on the board.
Right, that's why I was curious - is he running a full tilt gaming machine, or just typical browse & email & occasional spreadsheet, photo-edit, and is in the 'bigger is better' camp.

-ERD50
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Old 05-15-2015, 11:40 AM   #15
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I ended up canceling the 550 watt order and ordering a 450 watt Antec to replace my trusty 10 year old 400 watt Antec that finally gave out.
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Old 05-15-2015, 06:23 PM   #16
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I have been the sole IT person for the company I am with for the past 11 years. Most standard desktop computers are 250 to 350 watt power supplies. We have never had a problem adding a lower end video card. Most the computers are on a 220-330w battery backup which includes one or two 23-24" monitors. For some reason people like to go overkill on power supplies and RAM. I have measured a standard Dell desktop at less than 100w while loading the CPU, Prime 95 and Kill-A-Watt.


Seems to be pretty spot on. I built out what I would consider standard for our Dell machines and it was coming in between 200-250w recommend power supply.
Yeah. Lots of people go overkill. Of course, part of that may be due to folks used to low quality power supplies that put rated at 500W (at 25C) but only deliver half their rated wattage at typical 40C ambient temps inside a desktop case.

Iirc, maximum PCIe power draw for video cards that don't require their own 6- or 8-pin power supply connector is 75W. The really low end cards typically only use 20W or less.

Personally, I use 120W PicoPSUs on a number of my builds. It's really pretty amazing how power efficient new Intel CPUs (even quad-core ones) are beginning with Sandy Bridge. Admittedly, Conroe/Wolfdale started the ball rolling.
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Old 05-15-2015, 07:48 PM   #17
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One of the more interesting things I keep running across is instability in lightly loaded switching power supplies, particularly ones that cut a few corners to keep costs down. Of course, no PC parts vendor would ever do that.

The switching supplies use an internal oscillating circuit and feedback which alters the generated signal to generate and regulate the desired signal. When under a load substantially lower than the design point for the power supply, the feedback signal is telling the oscillating circuit to throttle way back, and it may wind up operating very close to the point where it shuts down. Voltage regulation can become very poor. That leads to mystery glitches in the PC.

As another poster mentioned, a 50% of rated load operating point is a sort of sweet spot, with good efficiency and regulation.


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Old 05-15-2015, 11:49 PM   #18
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As another poster mentioned, a 50% of rated load operating point is a sort of sweet spot, with good efficiency and regulation.
Not really all that practical when modern desktops with even quad-core Ivy Bridge or Haswell processors idle at 10-30W. I try to target idle load at 20% rated wattage. That's pretty much the load where 80 Plus certification testing starts on.
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Old 05-16-2015, 12:40 AM   #19
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While I could have gotten away with a 450W (or even smaller) PSU on my most recent build what I was really looking for was good ripple and regulation performance in the tests. Smallest of the really well reviewed units I found was a 550W (XFX XTR) and since that gave me a bit of headroom in choosing my Graphics Card then so much the better (and snagging the PSU for half price last BF didn't hurt either).

PSUs aren't that expensive and coughing up an extra $30-50 for a decent one every few years has always seemed like a good deal to me.
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Old 05-16-2015, 02:20 AM   #20
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While I could have gotten away with a 450W (or even smaller) PSU on my most recent build what I was really looking for was good ripple and regulation performance in the tests. Smallest of the really well reviewed units I found was a 550W (XFX XTR) and since that gave me a bit of headroom in choosing my Graphics Card then so much the better (and snagging the PSU for half price last BF didn't hurt either).
SeaSonic. 'Nuff said.
Edit: Apparently, SeaSonic is the OEM for the XFX XTR.

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PSUs aren't that expensive and coughing up an extra $30-50 for a decent one every few years has always seemed like a good deal to me.
I do pay for quality PSUs. However, I still try to target the 300-400W range for better efficiency at low loads. Heck, 300-400W is more than fine for a single mid-range GPU. My old i7+GTX 460 build idled at ~50W and just hit ~150-200W while gaming. That's power consumption from the wall. Assuming 85% efficiency (80Plus Bronze), that's just ~130-170W at heavy load.

Granted, 550W isn't really overkill. I've seen folks using and recommending 700+W PSUs on single video card configs (and the cards aren't even dual GPU models).
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