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Old 08-26-2014, 03:09 PM   #21
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Has anyone heard the expressions "this day morning" and "today morning" to convey "this morning"? I heard this a lot from Middle Eastern and Indian colleagues. I thought it was charming.
My kids would say stuff like that when they were little. Like "last day" instead of yesterday. I guess they figure "last day" follows the same rules of construction as "last night".

For your colleagues, the today morning phrase might be a literal translation from their other language(s) that isn't English.
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Old 08-26-2014, 03:10 PM   #22
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I have never heard the word "needful", either in the US nor in my work/travels in the UK, Canada or Australia.
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Old 08-26-2014, 03:12 PM   #23
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I am needful that I do miss the sounds of Calcutta each day morning...

Hey, I likes it!
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Old 08-26-2014, 03:13 PM   #24
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Here's a word I never used/seen before working for the current megacorp - bifurcate. It showed up in a slide and I had to do a quick dictionary check. I don't think the use of "bifurcate" was very needful in the context.
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Old 08-26-2014, 03:20 PM   #25
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I think it's just an English expression that is commonly used in India. I too used to work with many developers and others from India and this was a phrase I heard often from them, and never anywhere else. Since that career ended over 16 months ago, I've never heard that phrase again until now...
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Old 08-26-2014, 03:23 PM   #26
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In the UK, to "slate" a TV show means to criticise it heavily, not to schedule it.
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Old 08-26-2014, 03:31 PM   #27
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Here's a word I never used/seen before working for the current megacorp - bifurcate. It showed up in a slide and I had to do a quick dictionary check. I don't think the use of "bifurcate" was very needful in the context.
If you were an anatomy professor or vascular surgeon you would be using "bifurcate" on a daily basis.

"The aorta bifurcates into the right and left femoral arteries."
"The aortic aneurysm's distal edge is 3 cm proximal to the bifurcation of the aorta."
Etc.
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Old 08-26-2014, 03:33 PM   #28
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In Ireland, if something is described as "deadly" it means it is what in the US is called "awesome".

Emigrating was an adventure in colloquialisms!
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Old 08-26-2014, 04:24 PM   #29
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In Ireland, if something is described as "deadly" it means it is what in the US is called "awesome".

Emigrating was an adventure in colloquialisms!
"Sick" is also used to mean awesome. Sick = precursor to deadly?
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Old 08-26-2014, 04:36 PM   #30
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Has anyone heard the expressions "this day morning" and "today morning" to convey "this morning"? I heard this a lot from Middle Eastern and Indian colleagues. I thought it was charming.
The Germans use an expression that would translate that way- maybe other languages do, too. I used to get confused because I worked for a company headquartered in the German-speaking section of Switzerland and in German, "halb neun" meant 8:30, ("literally half nine"). When my British boss said "half nine" he meant 9:30.

And then there were my Indian colleagues, who coined the charming back-formation "pre-pone", which meant that an event had been moved to an earlier time.
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Old 08-26-2014, 04:57 PM   #31
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...............A while back I heard that in Canada when something at a meeting is 'tabled' that means it's brought to the fore front for discussion. The exact opposite of what 'tabled' means in the USA. Right or wrong?
I w*rked with a Brit that kept wanting to discuss a topic at a regular meeting and couldn't understand why every time he got agreement to table the topic, everyone got up and left.
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Old 08-26-2014, 05:01 PM   #32
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DS got in trouble his first day in US school (3rd grade) after 4 years in an international school with curriculum in the King's English. He asked the teacher for a "rubber".
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Old 08-26-2014, 05:16 PM   #33
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DS got in trouble his first day in US school (3rd grade) after 4 years in an international school with curriculum in the King's English. He asked the teacher for a "rubber".
In Australia 'Durex' is/was a brand of Scotch Tape, whereas in England it is/was a/the brand of contraceptives.

Back in the 1960s a girl, (tall, blond, good looking), who traveled on the same ship I was on from OZ to England, apparently (I heard from a third party) landed a job with an advertising agency......prepping a pork-based product for a photo-shoot, she apparently asked, in a loud voice, "Does anyone have any Durex I can put on these sausages?".

Brought the house down.
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Old 08-26-2014, 06:37 PM   #34
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Around here it is doing a needle full. In the ghetto...
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Old 08-26-2014, 06:58 PM   #35
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Old 08-26-2014, 07:26 PM   #36
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Has anyone heard the expressions "this day morning" and "today morning" to convey "this morning"? I heard this a lot from Middle Eastern and Indian colleagues. I thought it was charming.
I heard this pretty frequently from my Indian co-workers - 'too-day morning', accent on the 'too'. Always kind of liked it, too.
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Old 08-26-2014, 07:26 PM   #37
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Here's a word I never used/seen before working for the current megacorp - bifurcate. It showed up in a slide and I had to do a quick dictionary check. I don't think the use of "bifurcate" was very needful in the context.
I use bifurcate frequently - in fact I used it in an article I wrote the a couple days ago.
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Old 08-26-2014, 07:27 PM   #38
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In fact, "today morning" makes perfect sense, because we say "yesterday morning" and "tomorrow morning". Maybe we should change!
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Old 08-26-2014, 10:00 PM   #39
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Guess I live a sheltered life. First time I'd ever heard of it was this thread.
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Old 08-26-2014, 10:01 PM   #40
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I use bifurcate frequently - in fact I used it in an article I wrote the a couple days ago.
In graduate school, "bifurcate" was a favourite word. "Trifurcate" only caught on with a few of us (most of whom sat in the back row).
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