Join Early Retirement Today
View Poll Results: Should we use Flex or Ridged?
Flex 2 25.00%
Ridged 6 75.00%
Voters: 8. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Drain for yard. Fixed vs Flex
Old 05-24-2018, 06:25 AM   #1
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 15,295
Drain for yard. Fixed vs Flex

We are having our yard beautified with stones etc. One of the things I want is a drain for the back yard.


So, a simple question... should we have them install flex pipe or ridged?


I am worried that the flex pipe will keep water as it is not straight and we will have more mosquitoes.... but I have no idea and am starting my research....


Comments are welcome..
__________________

Texas Proud is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 05-24-2018, 07:08 AM   #2
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
DFW_M5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: DFW
Posts: 5,514
Rigid pipe will flow better and be less subject to clogs, but is more expensive and more difficult to install.
__________________

__________________
Doing things today that others won't, to do things tomorrow that others can't. Of course I'm referring to workouts, not robbing banks.
DFW_M5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2018, 07:54 AM   #3
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Just North of Boston, Soon on way to Maine
Posts: 664
Mosquitoes lay in standing water, even if you had some water left in the drain, the next rain would wash it (and any mosquito larvae) out.
ChiliPepr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2018, 11:46 AM   #4
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 1,057
More info please.....

What type of drain? Sump Pump? Yard drain? Roof Gutter drain? French drain? or?

Where is it draining to? Relocating the unwanted water to a lower area of the yard? Connecting to a city storm drain?

Fabric covered perforated flex pipe can be had. It should work for many applications. It keeps the dirt out of the pipe preventing mud dams. It would also allow the "standing" water in the corrugations of the pipe to drain to the ground when the ground is dry. If you need to get the drain away from the foundation, you could use hard pipe for the 1st 10 ft or so, then connect to flex pipe.
CRLLS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2018, 11:57 AM   #5
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 15,295
Drain is for getting water from the back yard out of there... right now it is just a river flowing along the side of the house and at time I mean a river... takes a lot of soil away from the back yard...


In the future I am looking to add flow from downspouts to the system.... but for right now they will just flow into the yard and be picked up through the grate...
Texas Proud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2018, 12:25 PM   #6
Moderator Emeritus
Ronstar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: A little ways southwest of Chicago
Posts: 11,298
I would use the 4 perforated corrugated flexible black plastic pipe with fabric sock. Thats what I used for getting drainage out of a low area. I used non perforated corrugated near the house for downspout connections to keep drainage away from the house. There are all sorts of fittings, drainage inlets, etc made to fit the 4 corrugated pipe.
__________________
The wilderness is calling and I must go.
Ronstar is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2018, 03:26 PM   #7
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: SoCal, SE Florida, Lausanne
Posts: 1,076
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas Proud View Post
Drain is for getting water from the back yard out of there... right now it is just a river flowing along the side of the house and at time I mean a river... takes a lot of soil away from the back yard...


In the future I am looking to add flow from downspouts to the system.... but for right now they will just flow into the yard and be picked up through the grate...
We probably don't have as much rain as you do here, but when it does rain it's usually pretty heavy and for several days. We have an 8" ridged pipe drain running under both sides of our property to take water from behind our backyard to the street in the front. The 8" pipe tees off to two 4" ridged pipes under the sidewalks onto the street. If you have a "river" of water, you will need at least an 8" pipe. We connected our rain gutter downspouts to this 8" drain pipe using 4" ridged pipes and things work very well. We have no stagnant water anywhere during and after a storm. See the attached photos for some examples/ideas.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_5256.jpg (681.5 KB, 35 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_5491.jpg (717.2 KB, 33 views)
Freedom56 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2018, 05:41 PM   #8
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Western NC
Posts: 1,526
For drain pipe, buried underground?

In my development we are still digging up original (now collapsed) flex pipe & replacing it with Schedule 40 PVC (can roto-rooter out the latter)
ncbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2018, 09:28 PM   #9
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Encinitas
Posts: 266
Your "them" should be able to determine the proper type of pipe based on the type of drainage and the application. If they ask, your choice can be based on the cost and lifespan of the material and your budget. Given the considerable effort to install a good drainage system, scrimping on pipe would be a poor decision.

Proper installation is the most important element of a good drainage system - and the installers should let you know if/when there's a choice to be made.
Starsky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2018, 09:45 PM   #10
Moderator
samclem's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 14,260
Rigid. And with proper slope the entire way (generally considered to be 1/4" per foot). I would even make a point of checking the fall, where they can see you, at an early point of the process as the pipe is going in. Flexible pipe is faster and cheaper to install, the contractor may say it is "just as good," and it virtually assures that the pipe will have high and low points as it follows the bumpy contours of the bottom of the trench. Low points = trapped water and slow water (so the silt in it will drop out of suspension and clog up the pipe).

The big cost is in the digging. Don't try to save money on the pipe itself, and don't let them tell you that flex, with all its corrugation bumps that catch silt, thin walls that collapse, and up-and-down lay is "just as good."
samclem is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2018, 09:42 AM   #11
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
travelover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 11,630
I'd also go with rigid and I'd add a clean out so it can be snaked if needed at some future date. You can even leave the clean out plug buried slightly as long as you remember where it is located.
__________________
Yes, I have achieved work / life balance.
travelover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2018, 01:07 AM   #12
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 15,295
OK, thanks... I think I will go ridged....


Now, I will have a straight shot from the main drain to the street, but I am going to extend the pipe to a different place in the yard... so I plan on a 45 off the straight, a short straight, another 45 to get it back 10 feet or so...



Now I have to decide if I should have a 90 and another 10 feet or do a 45 a short straight another 45 to make that turn less harsh....


Suggestions?
Texas Proud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2018, 08:22 AM   #13
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 21,668
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas Proud View Post
...

Now I have to decide if I should have a 90 and another 10 feet or do a 45 a short straight another 45 to make that turn less harsh....


Suggestions?
Do two 45's instead of one 90. Absolutely. Not debatable. The downside is what, one extra piece? Versus less chance of a clog, and better flow?

Where's that "EASY BUTTON"?

-ERD50
ERD50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2018, 08:38 AM   #14
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
travelover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 11,630
Quote:
Originally Posted by ERD50 View Post
Do two 45's instead of one 90. .........
Yes, and as mentioned a clean out access can be added at this point for less than $10. Could save a world of grief later.
__________________
Yes, I have achieved work / life balance.
travelover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2018, 09:03 AM   #15
Moderator
samclem's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 14,260
Yes, I'd vote for two 45s. And of course you'll be using "long sweep" DWV fittings, not the tighter angles used for supply lines. +1 on putting in cleanouts to make things much easier later.
samclem is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2018, 09:17 AM   #16
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: SoCal, SE Florida, Lausanne
Posts: 1,076
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas Proud View Post
OK, thanks... I think I will go ridged....


Now, I will have a straight shot from the main drain to the street, but I am going to extend the pipe to a different place in the yard... so I plan on a 45 off the straight, a short straight, another 45 to get it back 10 feet or so...



Now I have to decide if I should have a 90 and another 10 feet or do a 45 a short straight another 45 to make that turn less harsh....


Suggestions?
I would keep the straight shot to the main drain to the street and use a "T" instead of a 45 for anything you want to connect at different points in your yard. If you are using 8" rigid pipes for the main drain, you can use a 8" to 4" T for other drains in your yard. Keep it simple.
Freedom56 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2018, 09:36 AM   #17
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 15,295
The main line is going to be 4 inch.... you cannot have any more as it needs to drain through the curb at the street.



Right now I am thinking about not putting in the extension to the other side of the back yard... I was out looking and I am not sure if there is going to be a need for it and also not sure of the slope... I can always add it later...



There are many tree roots in the way and I also know there are sprinkler lines that might be in the way.... if I am ridged something has to give if there is a conflict...


I will make sure there is a clean out installed... thanks all who suggested that... it did not cross my mind..
Texas Proud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2018, 10:04 AM   #18
Moderator
samclem's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 14,260
I installed a "curtain drain" to take away surface water, sounds like your project. One challenge , big or small depending on soil type, is keeping water moving toward the pipe as fines slowly block any screens, sock, or mesh filters over the years. I wound up using a system tested by the Army Corps of Engineers. Solid pipe with slits cut every 2 inches to let water in.
Set the pipe in a trench with coarse sand. Use coarse sand all the way to the surface, or put a little topsoil over it if grass is desired. Not much sand found its way into the pipe, and lack of a filter "sheet' keeps it from silting up solid right away.
samclem is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2018, 01:18 PM   #19
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 15,295
Quote:
Originally Posted by samclem View Post
I installed a "curtain drain" to take away surface water, sounds like your project. One challenge , big or small depending on soil type, is keeping water moving toward the pipe as fines slowly block any screens, sock, or mesh filters over the years. I wound up using a system tested by the Army Corps of Engineers. Solid pipe with slits cut every 2 inches to let water in.
Set the pipe in a trench with coarse sand. Use coarse sand all the way to the surface, or put a little topsoil over it if grass is desired. Not much sand found its way into the pipe, and lack of a filter "sheet' keeps it from silting up solid right away.

Not quite what I am worried about. What I have is a normal back yard. When it rains all the water that lands in the back yard and runs off the roof in the back has only one direction to go, toward one side of the house.. it is about a 2 to 3 foot section that has significant water flow when it rains hard.... all I want to do is put in a drain box at the beginning of the section and pipe it out to the street...


Our neighbor has a bed of river rocks along the side of their house to stop the soil erosion... I will have this also, but want the drain to get the majority of rain if not all...
Texas Proud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2018, 05:26 AM   #20
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
pb4uski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Vermont & Sarasota, FL
Posts: 23,020
I recall that when they installed our septic system and the 4" sewer pipe from the house had to make a 90 degree turn they used a sweep that was about 3' around. I had never seen one before.
__________________

__________________
If something cannot endure laughter.... it cannot endure.
Patience is the art of concealing your impatience.
Slow and steady wins the race.

Retired Jan 2012 at age 56...60/35/5 AA
pb4uski is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fidelity Flex almost_there FIRE and Money 10 07-02-2017 07:31 AM
Maintain a "Flex Premium Adj Life" ins policy? ERD50 FIRE and Money 6 10-07-2015 01:37 AM
Fitbit Flex/Jawbone Experiences yakers Other topics 1 11-11-2013 12:49 AM
Junk yard dogs? MRGALT2U Other topics 0 06-04-2005 05:50 AM
Yard sale methodology and etiquette cute fuzzy bunny Other topics 28 03-15-2004 12:59 PM

» Quick Links

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:24 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×