Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Driving a Tundra on the tundra
Old 08-31-2015, 03:24 PM   #1
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
redduck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: yonder
Posts: 2,052
Driving a Tundra on the tundra

A relative has offered to give my daughter her 2001 Toyota Tundra (4WD, V8, 61,000 miles).

My daughter lives in Wisconsin where it apparently snows a lot. She and Tundra are both originally from California where it doesn’t snow--or even rain. The question is: Just how safe is a Tundra on the tundra (e.g. difficult to drive in bad weather)? Is it harder to brake (actually, harder to stop than other cars/trucks)? Does it tend to fishtail more than other vehicles, etc? The daughter has lived in Wisconsin for several years now, so she has had experience driving in the snow, just not in something as large as a Tundra.
__________________

__________________
Carpe cōleī
redduck is online now   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 08-31-2015, 03:39 PM   #2
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso) Give me a forum ...
REWahoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Texas Hill Country
Posts: 42,065
Pickups are light in the rear to allow for cargo capacity. Throw a few bags of sand in the bed (of the truck!) and it should handle fine in adverse weather.
__________________

__________________
Numbers is hard

When I hit 70, it hit back

Retired in 2005 at age 58, no pension
REWahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2015, 04:17 PM   #3
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Senator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Eagan, MN
Posts: 3,039
I drive a F350 7.3 Diesel all year long. In the winter, I plow snow. I do add some block (~850 lbs) in the back when I plow, but try to take them out if I am not plowing for a few days.

I use 4WD when the roads are snowy or icy, and I have Goodyear Silent Armour tires.

Any car is good, front wheel drive makes it better. All wheel drive when you have to, and great tires will make a world of difference.
__________________
FIRE no later than 7/5/2016 at 56 (done), securing '16 401K match (done), getting '15 401K match (done), LTI Bonus (done), Perf bonus (done), maxing out 401K (done), picking up 1,000 hours to get another year of pension (done), July 1st benefits (vacation day, healthcare) (done), July 4th holiday. 0 days left. (done) OFFICIALLY RETIRED 7/5/2016!!
Senator is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2015, 04:26 PM   #4
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 698
Our youngest is going to graduate school in Wisconsin. He drives a 4WD SUV and during winter, his roommate's cars remain parked while he can drive with no problem. He sometimes feels sorry for students trying to drive their cars out of the parking lot as he drives around them. As others have said, just throw some weight in the bed during winter. If she's become a seasoned winter driver, you can even skip that most of the time.


Sent from my iPad using Early Retirement Forum
__________________
akck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2015, 04:28 PM   #5
Recycles dryer sheets
Theseus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 484
Simpy put, "tires, tires, tires" is my best advice. And that's with 41 years of driving experience in tundraland, with econoboxes, sports cars, 4x4 trucks, SUV's, motorcycles (in the winter? - yeah, BTDT), you name it. I've literally had vehicles that couldn't climb a 2% grade transformed into blizzard worthy road (or off-road) warriors by replacing the tires. One doesn't necessarily need to go to an overly aggressive (read noisy) tread to get there either. Even if the tires on the Tacoma are in visibly good condition with deep tread, one can get a good idea of the winter worthiness by checking for brand specific reviews on the web, I'd recommend Tire Rack for that. And if the tires are at all questionable, replacing them before the snow flies with a tire rated more highly for deep snow and ice traction is the way to go, and is well worth the money.
__________________
Theseus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2015, 06:33 PM   #6
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Car-Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Citizen of Texas
Posts: 2,465
For the past 20 years or so, I have always kept at least one full sized 4 wheel drive pickup. A couple of Chevy's, a Nissian Titan and a couple of Tundra's. Currently I have a 2015 Tundra w/4 wheel drive. To be honest, I have liked them all. I rarely need 4 wheel drive on the road but it's really nice to have when it's slick (rain or snow). However, the best 4 wheel drive in the world is almost worthless without good tires. Two things I never scrimp on are my brakes and tires. I change them both well before many folks would think they are really needed. (But that's me)

To me they are no harder to drive than any other pickup. Just be sure to read the owners manuals on operating the 4w drive system on your truck.

The biggest problem I see with 4 wheel drive vehicles are many people think (bad ideas) that they can go any where they want off road and drive the speed limits in the rain or snow on the road. Trust me, they can still get stuck, slip, slide, hydroplane, etc, like any other vehicle.

With that said, I still feel a lot safer using 4 wheel drive in slippery conditions. (although there's usually not a lot of snow around here) Reliability of the 4 wheel drive components has been great. In the past 20 years I've only had to replace a solenoid on one of vehicles. Other than that, they have all been problem free and several have been driven over 100k miles.
__________________
Car-Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Driving a Tundra on the tundra
Old 08-31-2015, 06:36 PM   #7
Moderator
Ronstar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: A little ways southwest of Chicago
Posts: 9,333
Driving a Tundra on the tundra

Hopefully it's a 4wd Tundra. I wouldn't own a 2wd truck in Wisconsin. A 2wd truck is tough to drive in snow and worse on ice. A front wheel drive car handles lighter snows and ice better than a 2wd truck. Like REWahoo said, load the truck bed up with weight for the winter. Put it in 4wd when it snows.


Sent from my iPad using Early Retirement Forum
__________________
Ronstar is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2015, 06:38 PM   #8
Full time employment: Posting here.
Jack_Pine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 834
Weight in the back and make sure the tires are new with some aggressive tread and should do just fine.
__________________
The Constitution. It's not just a good idea...it's the law.
Jack_Pine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2015, 07:29 PM   #9
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: northern Michigan
Posts: 731
I live in the U.P. of Michigan, just across the border from Wisconsin. I own a 2012 4WD Toyota Tundra, and I love it. I believe you said the Tundra your daughter was getting was also 4 WD, and if so, she won't need to worry about putting extra weight in the bed (that would be important if she was getting a 2WD truck). If your daughter has driven other vehicles through Wisconsin winters, she should be experienced with winter driving in general, so she shouldn't have any problems with the Tundra. The only thing she may have to get used to is that the Tundra is a big truck, with limited turning radius, so it's quite a bit different than driving a car. But once she gets used to the size, she shouldn't have any problems. As someone else said, she won't need to use the 4WD all the time during winter......only when the roads are snow-covered or icy. And good tires are very important, as someone else said, so have her check the tires when she receives the truck, and if they have a lot of miles on them, new tires would be a good investment.
__________________
RAE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2015, 07:45 PM   #10
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
redduck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: yonder
Posts: 2,052
I'm getting the idea that the right tires are the key to this whole Tundra snow/ice on the road thing. And, weight in back may be a good idea, but, perhaps optional. (It is a 4WD). I'll have to check and see if I can buy her sandbags on Amazon (I have Prime, so I'll get a break on shipping).


edit: Just checked. Amazon only sells empty sandbags. What's up with that?
__________________
Carpe cōleī
redduck is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2015, 08:44 PM   #11
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso) Give me a forum ...
REWahoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Texas Hill Country
Posts: 42,065
Quote:
Originally Posted by redduck View Post
edit: Just checked. Amazon only sells empty sandbags. What's up with that?
Check jet.
__________________
Numbers is hard

When I hit 70, it hit back

Retired in 2005 at age 58, no pension
REWahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Driving a Tundra on the tundra
Old 08-31-2015, 08:44 PM   #12
Moderator
Ronstar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: A little ways southwest of Chicago
Posts: 9,333
Driving a Tundra on the tundra

I put bags of water softener salt in the pickup bed. That way i can use some to put under tires if I'm slightly stuck, or use later in the water softener.


Sent from my iPad using Early Retirement Forum
__________________
Ronstar is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2015, 08:52 PM   #13
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Moemg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Sarasota,fl.
Posts: 10,029
Quote:
Originally Posted by redduck View Post
I'm getting the idea that the right tires are the key to this whole Tundra snow/ice on the road thing. And, weight in back may be a good idea, but, perhaps optional. (It is a 4WD). I'll have to check and see if I can buy her sandbags on Amazon (I have Prime, so I'll get a break on shipping).


edit: Just checked. Amazon only sells empty sandbags. What's up with that?
Home Depot has bags of sand .
__________________
Moemg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2015, 09:41 PM   #14
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Western Canada
Posts: 393
Wisconsin has tundra?

I live where it gets cold. If we get snow in October, it's still there in April. I'll offer this: 4WD will help you get moving, it WON'T help you stop.
__________________
I'm not crazy. Honest, the judge had me tested.
Rick_Head is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2015, 09:59 PM   #15
Recycles dryer sheets
cooch96's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Lakewood
Posts: 442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Theseus View Post
Simpy put, "tires, tires, tires" is my best advice. And that's with 41 years of driving experience in tundraland, with econoboxes, sports cars, 4x4 trucks, SUV's, motorcycles (in the winter? - yeah, BTDT), you name it. I've literally had vehicles that couldn't climb a 2% grade transformed into blizzard worthy road (or off-road) warriors by replacing the tires. One doesn't necessarily need to go to an overly aggressive (read noisy) tread to get there either. Even if the tires on the Tacoma are in visibly good condition with deep tread, one can get a good idea of the winter worthiness by checking for brand specific reviews on the web, I'd recommend Tire Rack for that. And if the tires are at all questionable, replacing them before the snow flies with a tire rated more highly for deep snow and ice traction is the way to go, and is well worth the money.
+1 on tirerack.com.
__________________
Why be normal when you can be yourself?
cooch96 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2015, 10:20 PM   #16
Full time employment: Posting here.
GravitySucks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Syracuse
Posts: 989
Agree -Tires tires tires. And remember 4 wheel drive doesn't stop any better than 2 wheel drive.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Early Retirement Forum mobile app
__________________
“No, not rich. I am a poor man with money, which is not the same thing"
GravitySucks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2015, 10:38 PM   #17
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
38Chevy454's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 1,577
4WD will help you get going but it does not really stop or turn any better. Lot of people forget that. Real winter tires can make as much difference as anything, as several suggested. Some weight in the bed does help.

4WD does not make you able to drive like no concern for the bad traction. Just drive cautious, no fast acceleration, braking or turning and she will do fine.
__________________
After Monday & Tuesday even the calendar says, W-T-F...

Semi-Retired 7/1/16: working part-time (60%) for now [4/24/16 changed to 80%]
Retired Aug 2, 2017; age 53
38Chevy454 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 07:23 AM   #18
Full time employment: Posting here.
Jack_Pine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 834
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronstar View Post
I put bags of water softener salt in the pickup bed. That way i can use some to put under tires if I'm slightly stuck, or use later in the water softener.


Sent from my iPad using Early Retirement Forum
Me too, multi-purpose.
__________________
The Constitution. It's not just a good idea...it's the law.
Jack_Pine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 11:08 AM   #19
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
redduck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: yonder
Posts: 2,052
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronstar View Post
I put bags of water softener salt in the pickup bed. That way i can use some to put under tires if I'm slightly stuck, or use later in the water softener.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack_Pine View Post
Me too, multi-purpose.
I live in Southern California, so I never needed to even think about stuff like this. (I also have never driven a truck). This information is all brand new to me.

Thanks for the tip.
__________________
Carpe cōleī
redduck is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 03:48 PM   #20
Moderator
Walt34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern WV Panhandle
Posts: 16,494
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick_Head View Post
I'll offer this: 4WD will help you get moving, it WON'T help you stop.
+1 on that. That was the biggest surprise when I got my first 4WD pickup and is what I tell people when they buy their first. "It'll go great in the snow but it doesn't stop worth a damn". Not surprising really - the tire patch on the ground isn't that much bigger than a car and it is a heavier vehicle because of the 4WD gear. But I've seen a lot of people get carried away with how great it goes and they forget about leaving more room for stopping.

So suggest to your daughter that she go out and play in the snow for a bit with it when she is not in a hurry to get anywhere and get used to how it drives. It isn't hard, but it is different.
__________________

__________________
I heard the call to do nothing. So I answered it.
Walt34 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
When will gas prices alter driving habits?? janeeyre Life after FIRE 55 05-01-2007 12:40 PM
So what are we driving? newguy88 Other topics 118 03-13-2007 02:00 AM
Driving From N.J. to Minneapolis this week................... Cut-Throat Life after FIRE 6 01-06-2007 06:39 AM
Talking on Cell phones while driving is todays biggest problem on the Highways.. Cut-Throat Other topics 40 12-13-2006 02:26 PM
What's driving VGSIX (reit) for the last 2 years? soupcxan FIRE and Money 10 10-06-2004 06:00 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:11 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.