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Dry-aged beef
Old 04-27-2018, 10:10 AM   #1
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Dry-aged beef

Is it really as good as advertised? I bought a couple of strip steaks that were dry-aged based on the butchers recommendation. I overcooked them on the grill (not intentional) so they were a little chewy and not a good example of a good steak.
Should I try again?
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Old 04-27-2018, 10:20 AM   #2
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Most definitely. We have a local butcher here in the ATL area that has amazing dry aged steaks. They are, by far, the BEST steaks I have ever been able to cook at home.
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Old 04-27-2018, 10:28 AM   #3
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I have not tried one in a long time... not sure if all steak houses serve them...

The last few times I bought steak from a steak house I was disappointed.... a couple overcooked and one too much gristle.....

I have enjoyed my steaks much more and they are much cheaper.... sometimes I screw up a bit.... like my last one I put on too much salt after reading about making sure you put on enough salt

The main thing to me is buy Prime... I have had Choice before that have been very good, but not always... I am rarely disappointed in Prime...
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Old 04-27-2018, 10:36 AM   #4
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I'm skeptical of the value of dry aging beef.
I think what the cow ate during life is far more important than what happened to its meat afterward.

When I lived in South America, I could go to the butcher to buy beef, and it was quite likely that the cow had met its maker within the preceding 24 hours. But it was all grass-fed and it tasted far richer than what we get here at home.

I would also second the recommendation for USDA Prime. Definitely a difference, at least most of the time.
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Old 04-27-2018, 11:05 AM   #5
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When I've had dry aged beef I like it less done. For me that means you show it fire and it's done.
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Old 04-27-2018, 11:18 AM   #6
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You might want to try drying your own. I saw Alton Brown do this on his cooking show. You can search home dry aged steaks. But, basically I dry the steaks with paper towels and turn them on edge and allow them to dry in the refrigerator for up to 5 days. I have dried roasts more than 5 days. I turn the steaks once per day. If they will not stand up on their own, I place toothpicks between the steaks for supports. This is not a true dry aged steak. But true dry aged takes weeks and requires trimming the steaks afterwards. This method replicates some of the qualities of a dry aged steak at a lower cost and less time. The photo is day two of steaks I bought yesterday at Costco.
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Old 04-27-2018, 12:42 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by braumeister View Post
I'm skeptical of the value of dry aging beef.
I think what the cow ate during life is far more important than what happened to its meat afterward.

When I lived in South America, I could go to the butcher to buy beef, and it was quite likely that the cow had met its maker within the preceding 24 hours. But it was all grass-fed and it tasted far richer than what we get here at home.
+1. We've bought grass-fed beef directly from a local farmer for the last several years now. Delicious. I have no plans to buy beef from the grocery store ever again. Grass-fed beef is healthier too - cows are grazing animals, designed to eat grass (not corn).
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Old 04-27-2018, 01:03 PM   #8
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I bought some grass fed beef and was not that impressed....

Yes, the flavor was different, but not better IMO...


Now, I wish I could get half a cow from my old boss and try his... but he seems to sell them mostly... and I do not want a whole cow...
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Old 04-27-2018, 01:04 PM   #9
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You might want to try drying your own. I saw Alton Brown do this on his cooking show. You can search home dry aged steaks. But, basically I dry the steaks with paper towels and turn them on edge and allow them to dry in the refrigerator for up to 5 days. I have dried roasts more than 5 days. I turn the steaks once per day. If they will not stand up on their own, I place toothpicks between the steaks for supports. This is not a true dry aged steak. But true dry aged takes weeks and requires trimming the steaks afterwards. This method replicates some of the qualities of a dry aged steak at a lower cost and less time. The photo is day two of steaks I bought yesterday at Costco.

Interesting.... do you think it adds any flavor?

When do you spice and how long do you leave the spice on?


I think I will try this out at least once...
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Old 04-27-2018, 01:18 PM   #10
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I agree with the recommendation to go with prime beef. Not sure about grass fed as I have never had it. I leave buying dry aged beef for a few specialty restaurants that know what they’re doing. At those establishments, yes, it is worth it to buy the dry aged beef.

First time I had a aged filet, my DW ordered the regular filet. I scarfed my down and it was delicious. DW, as is typical, did not finish her filet so I reached over and had a bite. I literally felt bad for not thinking to let her try my steak. The dry aged filet was a lot better. Since then, the best place I’ve had a dry aged steak is in Chicago. David Burke, in the James hotel. Unfortunately a google search just made me aware that it closed late last year
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Old 04-27-2018, 01:23 PM   #11
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Interesting.... do you think it adds any flavor?

When do you spice and how long do you leave the spice on?


I think I will try this out at least once...
It definitely adds to the flavor. Similar to professional dry aging, the steaks lose moisture (concentrating flavors) and the aging changes the texture. To cook, I bring the steaks to room temperature and just before I grill the steaks I add sea salt and fresh ground pepper. We grill steaks to 115 degrees. Let them stand tented with foil for about 8 minutes. Pour a glass of red wine and enjoy.
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Old 04-27-2018, 01:31 PM   #12
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I bought some grass fed beef and was not that impressed....

Yes, the flavor was different, but not better IMO...


Now, I wish I could get half a cow from my old boss and try his... but he seems to sell them mostly... and I do not want a whole cow...
Do you have a friend, relative or neighbor who might be willing to split a whole cow?
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Old 04-27-2018, 01:37 PM   #13
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Cook the perfect medium rare steak with Reverse Sear

The grass fed beef is higher in healthy Omega 3.

Jess Pryles taught me how to cook steak and I never looked back.
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Old 04-27-2018, 01:38 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by flintnational View Post
It definitely adds to the flavor. Similar to professional dry aging, the steaks lose moisture (concentrating flavors) and the aging changes the texture. To cook, I bring the steaks to room temperature and just before I grill the steaks I add sea salt and fresh ground pepper. We grill steaks to 115 degrees. Let them stand tented with foil for about 8 minutes. Pour a glass of red wine and enjoy.
You should try seasoning before drying in the fridge. And I've found really no difference after one to two days - so you don't have to remember too far in advance. Really what you are doing is getting a fabulous hard sear by drying the surface.

Here's Kenji's take https://www.seriouseats.com/2013/01/...f-at-home.html
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Old 04-27-2018, 01:41 PM   #15
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I haven't had enough dry aged to really tell the difference from a flavour perspective but do find them seeming more tender. Ditto with grass vs grain fed from a flavour perspective.

At this point, the best bang for our buck is the amount of marbling. The problem I have with grading though is that I find it can be hit or miss some times with the amount of marbling. We occasionally find AAA (aka Choice) graded steaks at Costco have more marbling than the prime and some of the prime steaks at Costco and butcher shops aren't very marbled at all.
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Old 04-27-2018, 01:41 PM   #16
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Dry aging in your home is pointless and depending on what is in your refrigerator at the time can actually harm the flavour a bit.

I live in South America and we are loaded with high end steakhouses (think Peter Lugar).

Professionally dry aged (several months) beef has a intense flavour like no other. Not to say everyone likes such a strong flavour.

Grass Fed vs UDSA Prime?

Grass fed cattle (in SA) can be a variety of ages when slaughtered, USDA Prime are younger and more tender then Choice by design.

We generally order one of each on our bi-weekly outings. Grass fed is more coarse and has less fat (marbling) than USDA Prime and while may be as tender has less flavor than USDA Prime.

I eat and enjoy both but it comes down to personal preferences. My Wife agrees but wants to maintain her figure, so she goes for the Argentinian grass fed and sneaks a few bites of my USDA Prime!
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Old 04-27-2018, 01:45 PM   #17
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The problem I have with grading though is that I find it can be hit or miss some times with the amount of marbling.
Yes, that's definitely true. It's why I said earlier that Prime is better "most of the time." You can't just grab a steak labeled Prime and expect it to be superb. Gotta examine the marbling.

For those who might be interested, here's an explanation of the meat grading standards:
Inspection & Grading of Meat and Poultry: What Are the Differences?
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Old 04-27-2018, 01:59 PM   #18
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I've had dry-aged beef about a half dozen times, including at David Burke's Primehouse in Chicago (a 55 day ribeye, there was a 70 day on the menu) and several times at various Capital Grille's (18+ days IIRC). The longer it's aged, the more concentrated the flavor (I'd agree) and the more tender (no clear difference IME). It's very good, but not significantly better than traditional wet-aged to me, just different to me.

If you like a great steak, you should definitely try it in a restaurant that specializes in and knows how to age and properly cook dry-aged steak, and decide for yourself. Obviously some people consider dry-aged clearly superior. You may not get the experience cooking one yourself at home, and it's very difficult to buy a dry-aged steak equal to the meat at a high end steakhouse.
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Old 04-27-2018, 03:08 PM   #19
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DW and I have been buying a beef, for over 30 years, from people we know. We can order our beef anyway we want, however, since the kids moved out 6-7 years ago, we only buy a half.

The last 25 years we half bought black Angus beef, grass fed until the last 6 weeks, when it is fed corn, grown by the same family raising the beef. The cow is limited in its range of movement in the pasture, as we want to fatten him up and marble the meat. We originally did the grass fed only beef in 1994 and 1995, but we thought the meat was flavorless/bland because of the lack of fat.

Our butcher hangs it a week before butchering, and we get all of our steaks cut 3/4" but I would like to go up to 7/8" this year. To each his own, my taste in beef is just as important as my own taste in wine, or coffee for that matter.

I age my steaks just as flintnational above. There are a few things in life to enjoy like a grilled T-bone or porterhouse, with a great dry red wine. I have already told the kids, that if I am laying in a hospital bed with tubes sticking out of me, it wasn't the tofu.
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Old 04-27-2018, 06:04 PM   #20
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^^When you buy a half cow, do you order the front half or the back half.
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