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Old 06-07-2013, 01:27 AM   #21
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You might learn to appreciate "Sir" if you were being called "Old G". This past week my GF was working out of office with an older man, and he was approached by a teenager who was wanting some money and was addressed as "Old G". My GF said he didnt appreciate it, and didn't give him any money. She asked her co-worker what the term meant, and he replied "Old Guy". BTW- The man was only 53, but to a teenager that is old. If the punk knew how to use the term "sir" he might have got a few bucks.
I'm on the wrong side of 40 now, but I still like to pretend that I'm somewhat in touch with youth culture. I'd bet a dollar that the young'in in question actually referred to the older gentleman as an "OG", which is short for "Original Gangsta'". From the kid's point of view, there's probably no greater compliment he could bestow on an older person.
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Old 06-07-2013, 06:51 AM   #22
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I'd bet a dollar that the young'in in question actually referred to the older gentleman as an "OG", which is short for "Original Gangsta'". From the kid's point of view, there's probably no greater compliment he could bestow on an older person.

This
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Old 06-07-2013, 08:03 AM   #23
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I wonder where that puts me. I was born in 1955, but I have albums by everybody on this list except Debbie Gibson and Grandmaster Flash. Of course, just calling them albums probably dates me somewhat. Actually, I don't really have any Rosemary Clooney albums, but I have a couple Bing Crosby albums she sings on. Plus a DVD of White Christmas.
It puts you as someone who likes a lot of different kinds of music.

I've listened to all of the above, it is from my memory and approximate dates. But if there was a "sweet spot" for me -- the time of your coming to age memories -- it would be Police, Blondie, Clash. That's late high school early college for me.

The list is incomplete. Just giving some ideas. It also bleeds over big time among generations, especially if you are open to music.

I apologize for not having any country in there. Not my thing. I'm more Pop, Standards, Funk, Rock kind of guy.
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Old 06-07-2013, 08:40 AM   #24
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It puts you as someone who likes a lot of different kinds of music.

I've listened to all of the above, it is from my memory and approximate dates. But if there was a "sweet spot" for me -- the time of your coming to age memories -- it would be Police, Blondie, Clash. That's late high school early college for me.

The list is incomplete. Just giving some ideas. It also bleeds over big time among generations, especially if you are open to music.

I apologize for not having any country in there. Not my thing. I'm more Pop, Standards, Funk, Rock kind of guy.

Country music does not have the same time sensitive styles. There is old traditional style, and the new style that sounds like pop music. and then bluegrass, which never changes. Even Jazz has periods (bop, etc) but those seem to transcend generations.

As I have become older, I certainly have learned to appreciate Jazz more.
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Old 06-07-2013, 02:09 PM   #25
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Isn't the group just before boomers the 'silent generation'? also known as the Korean war generation? The group that was first dominated by the WW2 folks and them overwhelmed out by the boomers? The over 67 group that is just now visible as the WW2 generation dies off?

Silent Generation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"The label "Silent Generation" was first coined in the November 5, 1951, cover story of Time to refer to the generation coming of age at the time, born during the Great Depression and World War II, including the bulk of those who fought during the Korean War."
Interesting, I thought the Silent Generation was the group born prior to the Greatest Generation. These labels are kind of fluid, it is quite possible for people born at the beginning of the Silent Generation to have fought in WWII. If you were born in 1926 you were 18 in 1944, you could have enlisted or been drafted and seen combat. You may have been in this scenario if you were born very early in 1927, were 18 in say Jan. 1945 and went to the South Pacific before August.
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Old 06-07-2013, 02:36 PM   #26
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Interesting, I thought the Silent Generation was the group born prior to the Greatest Generation. These labels are kind of fluid, it is quite possible for people born at the beginning of the Silent Generation to have fought in WWII. If you were born in 1926 you were 18 in 1944, you could have enlisted or been drafted and seen combat. You may have been in this scenario if you were born very early in 1927, were 18 in say Jan. 1945 and went to the South Pacific before August.
Maybe you mean the Lost Generation. That is the group just before the WW2 group.

Lost Generation: Born 1883-1900
WW2/GI Generation: Born 1901-1926.
Silent/Mature Generation: Born 1927- 1945.
Baby Boomer Generation: Born between 1946 and 1964. Two sub-sets.
Generation X: Born between 1965 and 1980
Generation Y/Millennium Generation: Born between 1981 and 2000
Generation Z/Boomlets: Born after 2001. Two subsets so far.

American Generations - Cycles in U.S. History
The Six Living Generations In America
http://www.prb.org/pdf09/64.1generations.pdf
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Old 06-07-2013, 09:17 PM   #27
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and then bluegrass, which never changes.
Nothing stays the same. I was at DelFest a couple of weeks ago. There was some traditional bluegrass, mostly Del and his boys, but most of it was Newgrass, also called Progressive Bluegrass or Jamgrass. Bands like Yonder Mountain String Band, String Cheese Incident, Railroad Earth, Trampled by Turtles, etc. Great musicianship, definitely bluegrassy, but some serious jam band stuff going on too. You don't see a ton of neo-hippies at your typical bluegrass concert, but they were out in force at Del. Sorry for the digression from the OP.
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Old 06-08-2013, 11:23 AM   #28
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Nothing stays the same. I was at DelFest a couple of weeks ago. There was some traditional bluegrass, mostly Del and his boys, but most of it was Newgrass, also called Progressive Bluegrass or Jamgrass. Bands like Yonder Mountain String Band, String Cheese Incident, Railroad Earth, Trampled by Turtles, etc. Great musicianship, definitely bluegrassy, but some serious jam band stuff going on too. You don't see a ton of neo-hippies at your typical bluegrass concert, but they were out in force at Del. Sorry for the digression from the OP.
Here in NC people are in love with the Avett Brothers. Actually, the whole country, maybe world, is in love with these guys. I recently learned what a roadie makes on one of their trips, and well, "shock and awe" came to mind, but I digress. (The old friend of a friend speak.)

The point is I have a hard core bluegrass and country fan friend, and he hates these guys. Let's just say the old school country and bluegrass guys are not impressed. But the kids? They LOVE the Avett Brothers.

Ironically, I kind of like them too.
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Old 06-08-2013, 11:58 AM   #29
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Second half Boom: (Heavy & Progressive, Disco) Neil Diamond, James Taylor, Jefferson Airplane/Starship, Led Zeppelin, Sly Stalone, KC Sunshine, Bee Gees
Good post. I identify with the above, but only from a "what was on the radio" perspective for many of them.

But, as noted earlier, I was under the impression I was a tail-end boomer. So for me, the 1964 definition of the end of the boomers is great news. That means only 72% of the boomers are ahead of me. Does that mean if I retire at 55, only 17% will be ahead of me
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Old 06-08-2013, 12:20 PM   #30
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Going back to the original message: I find it depressing how we fight among ourselves over a small piece of the pie, while the big boys and girls continue to eat a sumptuous feast.
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Old 06-08-2013, 03:57 PM   #31
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Nothing stays the same. I was at DelFest a couple of weeks ago. There was some traditional bluegrass, mostly Del and his boys, but most of it was Newgrass, also called Progressive Bluegrass or Jamgrass. Bands like Yonder Mountain String Band, String Cheese Incident, Railroad Earth, Trampled by Turtles, etc. Great musicianship, definitely bluegrassy, but some serious jam band stuff going on too. You don't see a ton of neo-hippies at your typical bluegrass concert, but they were out in force at Del. Sorry for the digression from the OP.
I cut my bluegrass teeth on John Hartford, New Grass Revival, and Earl Scruggs Revue...
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Old 06-08-2013, 04:40 PM   #32
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The "Greatest Generation" fought WWII. You weren't doing much of the fighting if you were born in 1944.

That's what I was thinking also. As an infant I would have been an ineffective, not great, citizen. I usually use "Pre-Boomer" when the subject arises. Most folks seem to know what I mean by it, so I will continue using it.
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Old 06-11-2013, 07:27 PM   #33
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You might learn to appreciate "Sir" if you were being called "Old G". This past week my GF was working out of office with an older man, and he was approached by a teenager who was wanting some money and was addressed as "Old G". My GF said he didnt appreciate it, and didn't give him any money. She asked her co-worker what the term meant, and he replied "Old Guy". BTW- The man was only 53, but to a teenager that is old. If the punk knew how to use the term "sir" he might have got a few bucks.
I would have interpreted "Old G" to mean "Old Geezer" and may have responded vocally.
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Old 06-11-2013, 07:34 PM   #34
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Maybe you mean the Lost Generation. That is the group just before the WW2 group.

Lost Generation: Born 1883-1900
WW2/GI Generation: Born 1901-1926.
Silent/Mature Generation: Born 1927- 1945.
Baby Boomer Generation: Born between 1946 and 1964. Two sub-sets.
Generation X: Born between 1965 and 1980
Generation Y/Millennium Generation: Born between 1981 and 2000
Generation Z/Boomlets: Born after 2001. Two subsets so far.

American Generations - Cycles in U.S. History
The Six Living Generations In America
http://www.prb.org/pdf09/64.1generations.pdf
Born in 1944. I will go with Pre-Boomer. I am not Silent and definitely not Mature.
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Old 06-11-2013, 08:46 PM   #35
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The "Greatest Generation" fought WWII. You weren't doing much of the fighting if you were born in 1944.
I was born 8 years before that and don't consider myself part of the greatest generation. As said, those were the people in the age group of my folks who fought in or were somehow part of that war effort. They are almost gone. So, I guess I'm of the silent generation.

Edited to add my thoughts on the music of my generation. In the few years before high school that I remember songs, and all during high school (1950-1954), the big band sound was still on top. Some artists like Rosemary Clooney, Patti Page, etc has their place and then the music changed about the time I graduated. Elvis hit the stage. I'm still a fan of the big band era.
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Old 06-11-2013, 09:12 PM   #36
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I'm on the wrong side of 40 now, but I still like to pretend that I'm somewhat in touch with youth culture. I'd bet a dollar that the young'in in question actually referred to the older gentleman as an "OG", which is short for "Original Gangsta'". From the kid's point of view, there's probably no greater compliment he could bestow on an older person.
I sure don't know, that is for sure. I consulted the urban dictionary, and both your opinion and his were both definitions of it. I am so far out of today's urban slang (I am a country boy anyways) if I was addressed as that I wouldn't have even looked as I would assume he wasn't even talking to me.
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Old 06-11-2013, 10:29 PM   #37
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I cut my bluegrass teeth on John Hartford, New Grass Revival, and Earl Scruggs Revue...
Bluegrass? Not John Hartford or the Earl Scruggs Review.

Earl was certainly bluegrass when he and Lester Flatt played with Bill Monroe as part of his Bluegrass Boys or later when they formed the Foggy Mountain Boys. But later when the elderly Earl joined his sons forming the Earl Scruggs Review and they threw in drums, keyboard and electric guitar, they sort of drifted out of the bluegrass venue. Interesting and entertaining music, we saw them here in the Chicago area several times, but not bluegrass.

John? Love much of his music and saw him live many times. But he wasn't, or didn't claim to be, bluegrass. I'd describe John as more of a eclectic singer-song writer and old time string band type, sometimes bordering on country western. Glen Campbell sure did a lot for his career when he recorded Wichita Lineman.

Of course, any music you enjoy is great whether it fits the confines of purist definitions or not!!
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Old 06-12-2013, 07:04 AM   #38
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Bluegrass? Not John Hartford or the Earl Scruggs Review.

Earl was certainly bluegrass when he and Lester Flatt played with Bill Monroe as part of his Bluegrass Boys or later when they formed the Foggy Mountain Boys. But later when the elderly Earl joined his sons forming the Earl Scruggs Review and they threw in drums, keyboard and electric guitar, they sort of drifted out of the bluegrass venue. Interesting and entertaining music, we saw them here in the Chicago area several times, but not bluegrass.

John? Love much of his music and saw him live many times. But he wasn't, or didn't claim to be, bluegrass. I'd describe John as more of a eclectic singer-song writer and old time string band type, sometimes bordering on country western. Glen Campbell sure did a lot for his career when he recorded Wichita Lineman.

Of course, any music you enjoy is great whether it fits the confines of purist definitions or not!!
Well, there was grass involved.

Much like Dylan, or Miles Davis, they defined a genre, and weren't so much defined by one.

And it was Gentle On My Mind. Jim Webb wrote Wichita Lineman...
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