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Old 11-05-2013, 08:00 AM   #21
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I had a metal roof installed in 2011....burgundy on a house with light gray siding and white trim.

It looks beautiful, is self cleaning when it snows ( you need to have the installers put on the little snow holders that can hold the snow back over areas where people will be hit by sliding snow. Even six inches of snow can weigh a ton when it slides off, and it DOES slide off all in one big pile!!!!

When it rains HARD, I can hear the rain, but because the roof is installed over the existing shingles ( which they said can be done over up to two layers of asphalt shingles), it si not that loud or noticeable. .Mine had one layer.

My house has a southern exposure, and very few trees around it. Sun hits the south side all day...and I swear in the summer the house is cooler and in winter my house is the ONLY house on my road that doesn't have icicles growing off the roof in winter ( although that was the case before the metal roof as well.)

After a rain, the roof looks brand new ( all the dust is washed off). Sometimes it gleams in the sunshine.

I like it. And would recommend it My roof has crazy angles and porches and so far, no leaks.

I have noticed no difference in WI FI or cell phone signal.

I live in W. Pa, and the winters are very harsh. I live on the top of a ridge, and it is ALWAYS windy up here, and I have not had any damage. The whole place takes a beating in the winter months......

I paid 10,500. included 30x30 attached garage, 26 x 60 house, and two overhanging porch roofs, and repair to one of those roofs that leaked. I also had seamless gutters installed. If you have gutters you MUST get the snow holders installed because the sliding snow will tear the gutters off the house due to weight. The holders slow the melting of the snow so it doesn't rush off the roof in a ten ton mass.

I'm 57 and did not want to get a "20 or 25 year roof" and have to spend this money all over again when I'm in my 70s. I looked at metal roofs for years in my travels and they seem to hold up well and continue to look nice. There are LOTS of them being installed where I live....

Hope this helps!
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Old 11-05-2013, 08:28 AM   #22
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I metal roof on this year. The look takes some getting used but I like it.
They are well insulated and the rain is either the same or more quiet than with my shingle roof. Another advantage is is super easy to attach PV panels to a metal roof, you can just use clips instead of drilling holes.

The cost was about 30% more than a good quality roof and perhaps 50% more than cheap roof.

I wasn't aware that tax credits were possibly available I'll have to check into that.
If it is an energy saver type, you get a 10% tax credit for all materials in construction provided it is not a new construction, $500 maximum limit. You will need to get a manufactures certification statement to verify it is one of those types, but most are it appears. It appears to me based on my readings that roof costs are all over the map depending on type you want and location. Although I am having the basic design, the local metal production company appears to be a lot cheaper here than in other locations of the country.
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Old 11-05-2013, 08:46 AM   #23
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I don't have one but would big hail dent them like it would a car?
It could, but some are more impact-resistant than others.

We had an impact-resistant metal roof placed on our last house in 2009; it cost a little under $5000 for a 1200 square foot house and we got a tax credit for around $500 as I recall. We got 20% discount on our home insurance for it (signing a waiver that strictly cosmetic dents would not be covered). I for one love the sound of rain falling on a metal roof. We didn't have any problems with wifi or cell phones, but I've heard that if you have a TV antenna in the attic, it could be a problem, especially if you are pretty far from the transmitters.
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Old 11-05-2013, 09:08 AM   #24
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I have a similar problem with a 13 year old roof that was supposed to be a 35+ shingle that never sealed properly so the shingles lift and develops leaks that are difficult to find the origins.

I thought of a metal roof but we have some old and very peculiar roof situations with half the roof in Homosote (an insulation sheeting kind of like dense cardboard over an exposed beam ceiling) and the other 1X6 decking.

Our home is the same sq. ft. and $6500 sounds like a really good price. I have been quoted much higher prices. Can you give a little more detail on the type (standing seam, V, etc.), guage of metal, tear off shingles or instal over existing roof, use furring strips or lay directly on the shingles, Manufacturer, etc.?

Cheers!
Badger,I am looking at the basic exposed fastener system. Costs quickly escalate when you go concealed and have a different design. The installer uses a high grade seal with metal washer over when installing the screw. He installs on top of ridge and not in the trough which carries more of the water. He installed his metal roof 15 years ago with same style and has had no leak issues. He also says most people around here go that way. I have read you can replace all existing screws and washers from a contractor for about $1000 here if the concern is ever there to replace them. Installer puts an underlayment on top of existing shingles then furring strips are attached to roof and metal is installed over it. 24 gauge metal used with Valspar WeatherX paint system. The metal company is a local one called B&C Metals which has a website. They have been around 25 years, and I noticed State Farm has them on the list for approved roofs for premium reduction.
Part of the reason it is less expensive, is you do not have to pay for the cost of removal and disposal of existing shingles. Labor is cheaper because it is easier and faster to install than shingled roofing.
I was recently down in the USVI and was amazed at how many buildings now have this type there. The fancier ones you couldn't even detect they were metal roofing unless you knew what you were looking for.
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Old 11-05-2013, 10:18 AM   #25
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We had a standing seam metal roof put on our two story log house (~2500sq ft) in 1986. House was located in western Virginia. When we sold it in 2012, it still looked very nice, and was a major selling point to the couple who bought the place. We had never had a leak or any problem, except where the "snow eagles" were not put on, and the sliding snow stripped off the gutters.

The roof was put on over 1X6 boards (not plywood or shingles) and could get QUITE load during heavy rainstorms. We really liked going to sleep at night with a light rain on the metal roof, however - very soothing.
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Old 11-05-2013, 10:21 AM   #26
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Forgot to mention - the roof we replaced was a standing seam roof that was put on the house in the 1930's and starting to develop minor leaks. Figured if the last roof had such a good track record, why mess with success
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Old 11-05-2013, 10:27 AM   #27
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Forgot to mention - the roof we replaced was a standing seam roof that was put on the house in the 1930's and starting to develop minor leaks. Figured if the last roof had such a good track record, why mess with success
I am not an expert on these, but I read these old "farm house" style roofs could last a 100 years. I guess it is now returning back to that way, of course except with them being a bit more "stylish" now.
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Old 11-05-2013, 10:28 AM   #28
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I don't know about cell service but a friend of mine has steel on the roof, siding, and foundation of his house. Because the steel goes from the ground to over the roof it makes a pretty good Faraday cage for AM/FM radio. We had to put up outside antennas in order for his radios to work well.
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Old 11-05-2013, 10:39 AM   #29
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You all have me interested in this now. My roof is 14 years old (1 layer of shingles) and is showing some beginning signs of curling and the dark streaks. If the dark streaking is mold, would covering it up with a new metal roof cause problems on down the line? Also, if the metal roof is installed over existing shingles, how can the condition of the actual wood under the shingles be inspected for any damage or deterioration?
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Old 11-05-2013, 11:03 AM   #30
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How do they handle existing roof vents (ridge vents, box-style roof vents and bathroom fan exhaust vents) when installing metal roofs?

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Old 11-05-2013, 11:11 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by Mulligan View Post
Badger,I am looking at the basic exposed fastener system. Costs quickly escalate when you go concealed and have a different design.
My roof has concealed, and I don't think exposed would
be a great idea, IF you have high winds. I was exposed to high winds coming right off the Sound, and some outbuildings I roofed with exposed nails eventually had the nails loosen and leak.

Ha
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Old 11-05-2013, 11:13 AM   #32
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How do they handle existing roof vents (ridge vents, box-style roof vents and bathroom fan exhaust vents) when installing metal roofs?

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Old 11-05-2013, 12:24 PM   #33
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Maybe it's just me, but I would never do a roof-over. I want my new roof on solid decking.
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Old 11-05-2013, 12:26 PM   #34
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Does a metal roof affect cell service? MiFi service?

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Not sure about cell or WIFI, but they are even better than a tinfoil hat in preventing the government from intercepting your brain waves.
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Old 11-05-2013, 12:37 PM   #35
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My roof has concealed, and I don't think exposed would
be a great idea, IF you have high winds. I was exposed to high winds coming right off the Sound, and some outbuildings I roofed with exposed nails eventually had the nails loosen and leak.

Ha
That would have been my preference but it is significantly higher, thus my reason not too. I have not seen a concealed one built yet in town. Winds aren't a real problem here unless I get unlucky and a tornado strikes the area (I live in Mo). They use screws on this system and they are more resistant to loosening than nails are, though it certainly is possible.
Another poster commented on not wanting a second layer on a roof. I would certainly feel that way concerning shingles, but it apparently isn't a problem based on what I have read. In fact the insurance companies give the discount with the metal installed over existing shingles, and the Feds give the tax credit for doing it that way also. The metal roof is only 1/7 th the weight of a shingled roof so it is not adding much weight to the house. But I also live in an area where I see 3 or 4 layers of shingles slapped on top of each other.
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Old 11-05-2013, 12:45 PM   #36
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The other benefits og metal roofs in WI is forest fire protection (to some degree) Insurance give us credit for that..........
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Old 11-05-2013, 12:46 PM   #37
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Mysterious leaks are often caused by a bad flashing spot. One tiny goof is all it takes. That can happen with metal or asphalt.
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Old 11-05-2013, 12:47 PM   #38
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Maybe it's just me, but I would never do a roof-over. I want my new roof on solid decking.
I THINK (still learning so someone can correct me if I am wrong) that even if the shingles were taken off, it would have to be attached to the deck anyways with a gap. Metal roofs have to breathe as they give off condensation both above and below. The underlayment and connecting strips help with this. My deck is still in good shape. The shingles I think can act as a second barrier and protection for roof if a leak does occur. But in honesty, I'm keeping it just to save money. Though the "Green People" advocate leaving them as a way to avoid dumping them in landfills. But some point down the road even if it's a 100 years, they still will wind up there.
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Old 11-05-2013, 12:50 PM   #39
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Mysterious leaks are often caused by a bad flashing spot. One tiny goof is all it takes. That can happen with metal or asphalt.
That is the whole reason I am getting a new one. The mysterious leak is definitely the culprit. Though I can't blame it on the flashing spots as they are all on the dry backside.
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Old 11-05-2013, 06:12 PM   #40
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The venting is usually handled with a steel ridge vent.
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