Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-19-2012, 12:15 PM   #41
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
jIMOh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Milford, OH
Posts: 2,085
Quote:
Originally Posted by HFWR View Post
Forty-three bottles of beer on the wall,
Forty-three bottles of beer...
The bottles are on the floor. I don't understand.

/sarcasm=off
__________________

__________________
Light travels faster than sound. That is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak. One person's stupidity is another person's job security.
jIMOh is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 01-19-2012, 12:24 PM   #42
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
braumeister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Northern Kentucky
Posts: 8,630
Quote:
Originally Posted by jIMOh View Post
I bottled after 10 days of fermenting (per instructions) and never checked alcohol content or similar.
After 10 days you should be OK, but that is not a guarantee by any means. This is how people make glass grenades.

The idea is that the yeast will ferment a certain percentage of the sugar into CO2 and alcohol. About 75% is a good rule of thumb for how much.

So you measure the specific gravity when you add the yeast. Measuring it with a hydrometer takes about 30 seconds. You then know that when the gravity gets down to about 25% of that level, the fermentation has probably stopped, no matter how many days it has been (watching airlock activity is just a poor substitute for measuring gravity).

Some yeast strains will ferment more than 75%, some less. The yeast supplier should tell you what's typical for a given strain.

If your fermentation hasn't gone far enough when you bottle it, and you have a weak spot in a bottle (not that uncommon), it can literally explode. Or, if the bottle is strong enough, you could have a gusher when you open it.

I'm not trying to be alarmist, and as I said, you should be OK, but measuring the gravity is so quick and easy that it really is worth doing.
__________________

__________________
Pas de lieu Rhône que nous.
braumeister is offline   Reply With Quote
Serious warning:
Old 01-19-2012, 12:33 PM   #43
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 18,299
Serious warning:

Quote:
Originally Posted by jIMOh View Post
LOL

The advice which was given to me was people did this in the 16th and 17th centuries (and earlier) without ANY temperature control. So the advanced instrumentation might help, but is clearly not required.

I bottled after 10 days of fermenting (per instructions) and never checked alcohol content or similar. I did taste it before I bottled it, and I think this is going to taste really yummy.
CAUTION: 'Bottle Bombs' are no joke. They do happen, and they can be extremely dangerous, as in maiming someone for life. If a bottle builds up enough pressure to blow, it sends tiny glass shards at high velocity. If you are holding the bottle, you wil have pierced skin, if you had it near your face, you could lose one (or both) eyes.

I had a bottle of root beer blow in the closet (soda pop is more likely to blow since it has a lot of sugar and you must stop carbonation, I didn't catch it in time). There were glass shards embedded in the wall. Don't mess around with this.

Ten days may or may not be enough time to get enough residual sugars fermented out. Without taking a hydrometer reading (or having considerable experience with your fermentations for that recipe), you can't know this. How much sugar did you add for bottling? Did you bottle any PET bottles so you could monitor pressure?

In the 16th and 17th centuries, they didn't bottle, the used wooden kegs which would not be so dangerous if they blew. They also went through long apprenticeship programs and knew when things went right or not. This is your first beer, you don't have that experience.

Likely, things will be fine. Ten days can be (and often is) enough depending on many things (original gravity, yeast condition, temperature, etc).

Did you move the beer to a 'secondary'? If so, I'd be more concerned - if you bottle after ten days, you would want the beer on the yeast the full ten.

Do yourself a favor, get a hydrometer and use it, take OG and FG readings. It's the only way you are really going to know what is going on. OG isn't really important for an extract brew - it will be whatever your extract and water ratios would predict. But for all-grain, or even a mini-mash, you really want to know what you got from your grain.


PS_ I just saw braumeister's post, and I AM trying to be an alarmist - a bottle bomb is just not something you want to risk. Google bottle bomb and home brew and I think you will find some scary stories.

-ERD50
__________________
ERD50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2012, 12:46 PM   #44
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
jIMOh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Milford, OH
Posts: 2,085
Quote:
Originally Posted by ERD50 View Post
CAUTION: 'Bottle Bombs' are no joke. They do happen, and they can be extremely dangerous, as in maiming someone for life. If a bottle builds up enough pressure to blow, it sends tiny glass shards at high velocity. If you are holding the bottle, you wil have pierced skin, if you had it near your face, you could lose one (or both) eyes.

I had a bottle of root beer blow in the closet (soda pop is more likely to blow since it has a lot of sugar and you must stop carbonation, I didn't catch it in time). There were glass shards embedded in the wall. Don't mess around with this.

Ten days may or may not be enough time to get enough residual sugars fermented out. Without taking a hydrometer reading (or having considerable experience with your fermentations for that recipe), you can't know this. How much sugar did you add for bottling? Did you bottle any PET bottles so you could monitor pressure?

In the 16th and 17th centuries, they didn't bottle, the used wooden kegs which would not be so dangerous if they blew. They also went through long apprenticeship programs and knew when things went right or not. This is your first beer, you don't have that experience.

Likely, things will be fine. Ten days can be (and often is) enough depending on many things (original gravity, yeast condition, temperature, etc).

Did you move the beer to a 'secondary'? If so, I'd be more concerned - if you bottle after ten days, you would want the beer on the yeast the full ten.

Do yourself a favor, get a hydrometer and use it, take OG and FG readings. It's the only way you are really going to know what is going on. OG isn't really important for an extract brew - it will be whatever your extract and water ratios would predict. But for all-grain, or even a mini-mash, you really want to know what you got from your grain.


PS_ I just saw braumeister's post, and I AM trying to be an alarmist - a bottle bomb is just not something you want to risk. Google bottle bomb and home brew and I think you will find some scary stories.

-ERD50
I've brewed and bottled before with a beginner kit (only LME and bottled from fermentation kit). This was my first time using grains...

I will learn to use the hydrometer next time...

the bottles are currently in a closet on the floor, so an exploding bottle will have minimal impact to human life until we drink it.

I fermented for 10 days, then siphoned to bottling keg, added 5 oz of sugar, stirred then bottled.
__________________
Light travels faster than sound. That is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak. One person's stupidity is another person's job security.
jIMOh is offline   Reply With Quote
Brewing
Old 01-19-2012, 12:49 PM   #45
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 91
Brewing

I have been brewing for many years and have had great fun and success with it. I have only done 5 gallon batches and have only gone as far as a partial grain. I am now considering scaling up to 10 gallons and to do a total grain brew. I am looking at different equipment but am wondering if I could get away with a 10 gallon mash tun to make 10 gallons of brew. Anybody got an idea on that?
__________________
afntrn56 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2012, 02:03 PM   #46
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
jIMOh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Milford, OH
Posts: 2,085
Quote:
Originally Posted by afntrn56 View Post
I have been brewing for many years and have had great fun and success with it. I have only done 5 gallon batches and have only gone as far as a partial grain. I am now considering scaling up to 10 gallons and to do a total grain brew. I am looking at different equipment but am wondering if I could get away with a 10 gallon mash tun to make 10 gallons of brew. Anybody got an idea on that?
The person helping me said it was like 80%. If you need X oz of LME, you need 80% more for DME. Something like that.
__________________
Light travels faster than sound. That is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak. One person's stupidity is another person's job security.
jIMOh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2012, 04:40 PM   #47
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 18,299
Quote:
Originally Posted by afntrn56 View Post
I have been brewing for many years and have had great fun and success with it. I have only done 5 gallon batches and have only gone as far as a partial grain. I am now considering scaling up to 10 gallons and to do a total grain brew. I am looking at different equipment but am wondering if I could get away with a 10 gallon mash tun to make 10 gallons of brew. Anybody got an idea on that?
Here's a handy calculator, scroll down to "Can I mash it?"

Green Bay Rackers--Mash Calculators

Depends on your recipe, but for 20# of grain at 1.25Q/#:

This mash will take up 7.85 gallons of space

Quote:
Originally Posted by jIMOh View Post
The person helping me said it was like 80%. If you need X oz of LME, you need 80% more for DME. Something like that.
Actually, nothing like that

DME, being dry ~ 2% moisture)) is more concentrated than LME (~20% moisture). So you use less DME than LME. The amount of grain you need will depend on your efficiencies. Best to plug into one of the calculators and see how it all works out.

-ERD50
__________________
ERD50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2012, 06:18 PM   #48
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
brewer12345's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 16,391
Quote:
Originally Posted by afntrn56 View Post
I have been brewing for many years and have had great fun and success with it. I have only done 5 gallon batches and have only gone as far as a partial grain. I am now considering scaling up to 10 gallons and to do a total grain brew. I am looking at different equipment but am wondering if I could get away with a 10 gallon mash tun to make 10 gallons of brew. Anybody got an idea on that?

It would work, but you would be limited to fairly modest gravity beers. I have a 13 gallon mash tun for a 10 gallon system and I can just about get to 1.075 OG. You would not get over 1.050 or so. I would get a bigger mash tun.
__________________
"There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest have to pee on the electric fence for themselves."



- Will Rogers
brewer12345 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2012, 08:08 PM   #49
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 91
Thanks guys. I will probably go with the 15 gallon mash tun.
__________________
afntrn56 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2012, 09:00 AM   #50
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 91
Ok so another question. Let's say I go for the 15 gallon size Mash Tun and I have a 15 gallon brew kettle do I still need to buy a 10 or 15 gallon Hot liquor tank? I wonder if anyone uses the brew kettle for a liquor tank and puts the wort in a bucket and when done transfers the bucket into the HLT/brew kettle for the boil? Seems like it could work that way and avoid the expense of another kettle purchase. Anybody work it this way?
__________________
afntrn56 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2012, 12:31 PM   #51
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
braumeister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Northern Kentucky
Posts: 8,630
Quote:
Originally Posted by afntrn56 View Post
I wonder if anyone uses the brew kettle for a liquor tank and puts the wort in a bucket and when done transfers the bucket into the HLT/brew kettle for the boil?
You can certainly do it that way if you like. Multiple buckets, of course.
__________________
Pas de lieu Rhône que nous.
braumeister is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2012, 02:17 PM   #52
Recycles dryer sheets
l2ridehd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: PWC VA
Posts: 126
Can anyone explain the differences in making English "no gas" beer? Spent a lot of time in the UK and grew to enjoy their beer. Think Bodington on tap. Would love to make something like that.
__________________
l2ridehd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2012, 02:57 PM   #53
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
brewer12345's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 16,391
Quote:
Originally Posted by l2ridehd View Post
Can anyone explain the differences in making English "no gas" beer? Spent a lot of time in the UK and grew to enjoy their beer. Think Bodington on tap. Would love to make something like that.
Don't carbonate the beer highly and you are done. Easy to vary in the keg (force carb to a lower level) or bottles (use less priming sugar).
__________________
"There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest have to pee on the electric fence for themselves."



- Will Rogers
brewer12345 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2012, 03:02 PM   #54
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
braumeister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Northern Kentucky
Posts: 8,630
Typical American lagers are carbonated to around 2.5 to 2.75 volumes of CO2.
Typical English bitters are more like 1.5 to 2.0 volumes.
So either adjust the mount of priming sugar proportionately, or if you force carbonate, adjust the pressure/temperature appropriately.
__________________
Pas de lieu Rhône que nous.
braumeister is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2012, 06:47 PM   #55
Moderator
Ronstar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: A little ways southwest of Chicago
Posts: 9,370
Just had a great brew day. The beer on the left is a porter that I'm going to add Jack Daniel's soaked vanilla beans to. The beer on the right is "O'DW's Irish Red". It will be kegged and ready to drink just in time for St. Patty's day.

__________________
Ronstar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2012, 08:51 PM   #56
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by l2ridehd View Post
Can anyone explain the differences in making English "no gas" beer? Spent a lot of time in the UK and grew to enjoy their beer. Think Bodington on tap. Would love to make something like that.
Just stumbled upon this inactive thread. There are also hand pumped cask ales (English heritage). Here's a link to wikipedia: Cask ale - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Here's a link to a discussion on building your own: HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.
__________________
copyright1997reloaded is offline   Reply With Quote
Another Homebrew critter
Old 09-26-2012, 09:20 PM   #57
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 197
Another Homebrew critter

Since I'm here waking the thread from the dead, last year I started doing home brew. (I had actually tried it a couple times in the late 80's/early 90's, but gave it up due to lack of time.)

I started doing extract but quickly graduated to all-grain after my first two batches. My reasons for doing so were:
1) I like baking from scratch, so the thought of using extract/kits wasn't appealing.
2) I'm cheap (that's how you become FIREd), and I could get my "per batch" cost much lower than with extract.
3) I liked the fact that I could better control color, body, other factors (really an offshoot of #1)

Since last July (2011), I've done 32 batches, mostly 5 gallons. In terms of style, I love me those IPA's (both English style and US varieties), but try to alternate IPA/non-IPA in my brew schedule. I use a modified BIAB method where I do my mash using a bag. Depending upon my mood, I will do the mash on my stove or in a igloo style water bucket. I do the boil outside using propane due to the volumes involved.

One of the biggest things to improve the quality of beer is fermentation temperature control. I have an old refrigerator that I use as a fermentation chamber. In the summer, it provides cooling, in the winter heat. I rigged up an aquarium style digital temperature controller ($22) that controls both cooling (where it drives the refrigerator compressor) and heating (where I use a 60 watt light bulb in a paint can I built) and it allows me to dial in a fairly accurate fermentation temperature.

For water, I use a local source of (free) spring water. I have a well, but this tastes better and results in better tasting beer. (The source was used long ago for soda water and other beverage production.)

I have a freezer that I bought (home depot, $159 delivered) that I use as a "Keezer". Along with that, I've managed to scarf up kegs whenever I find them cheaply, I have 10 of them now. So, I mostly keg but I also will bottle from the keg when I want to give beer to others, save some, or just make room in the keezer for the next batch (it holds 4 kegs TIGHTLY but I usually keep one keg for home made soda).

I've also accumulated a bunch of fermentation buckets and carboys. I have a few fermentation buckets and four glass carboys, so plenty of room there. In general, I do not secondary but rather use a sanitized stainless steel keg as a conditioning vehicle after I rack from the primary. I'm kind of lazy as to racking from primary, I usually let it go at least two weeks before I take a gravity reading. [Comment: I think the beer is better by having a good pipeline...it makes you lazy in terms of racking from primary, and the beer comes out better.] Since I condition in keg, I also use that as the vehicle for cold crashing...since doing so (and using Irish Moss/Whirfloc) my beers have been nice and clear.

As I mentioned above, I'm cheap. I've gotten involved with group buys for grains and hops, and I'm currently sitting with over 400# (easily) of grain and 30# (easily) of hops. I store the base grains in food grade buckets (w/gamma seal lids) or seal the specialty grains in pre-measured amounts using a vacuum sealer. I store the hops in vacuum sealed bags in a freezer. I also re-use yeast by "washing" it. So, you can imagine what my basement looks like with grain buckets, my freezer with hops, and my refrigerator with washed yeast. But, the net result is my cost for 5 gallons of a great IPA is in the $15 neighborhood.

Eventually I would like to build an electric (home) brewery. I already have three 20 gallon stainless steel pots (through another group buy), and a few other parts....but need at some point to dedicate some real time to building the control panel.
__________________

__________________
copyright1997reloaded is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:02 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.