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How much Hand Truck do we need?
Old 06-07-2019, 02:56 PM   #1
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How much Hand Truck do we need?

We need something to help move heavier furniture around while preparing to paint.

Things like a china cabinet, heavy bookshelves, etc. that don't come apart or have wheels.

We're looking at hand trucks online, but it's hard to tell what to buy. The prices and features vary quite a bit.

Also, how do you keep the item from falling off? Even the trucks rated at 800 lbs (more than anything weighs that we own) only have a teeny shelf at the bottom to slide under the furniture.

So here are the ones we're looking at:

[ url=https://www.amazon.com/Milwaukee-49180-Convertible-10-Inch-Pneumatic/dp/B000IYOWR0/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=milwaukee+49180&qid=1559938478 &s=beauty&sr=8-1/] Milwaukee 49180[/ url]
This one's convertible to a 4-wheel dolly, although we don't really need that capability right now. But who knows what we'll need in future?

[ url=https://www.walmart.com/ip/Milwaukee-37109-Flow-Back-Hand-Truck-600-Lb-Capacity-Red/127014690/] Milwaukee 37109[/ url] This one is much less expensive, but doesn't convert to a horizontal dolly.

Thoughts and advice are welcome.

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Old 06-07-2019, 03:13 PM   #2
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First rule is not to hurt yourself trying to raise something too heavy off the ground. Better to hire someone if it is too much.

I built a simple dolly using 4 pieces of wood, 4 swivel wheels, and some old carpet for the top to protect pieces while moving. Have had it hanging around for years and it comes in handy occasionally.

Also I think you can buy these 1 wheel triangles that go on each edge of a piece to move it. Look up "furniture moving with triangles on wheels".
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Old 06-07-2019, 03:13 PM   #3
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We had a hand truck like the 49180 that we used for many years. It was a great cart, and we used the convertible feature many times. But we moved a lot of freight and heavy things frequently. The pneumatic tires move a bit easier, because they can flex over uneven surfaces. But it is a heavier cart.

As far as lashing things- you would need to buy some ratchet binding straps of some type. We rarely would need anything like that. If you are moving things like refrigerators, freezers, heavy appliances- then you can rent an appliance cart. These have a built in ratchet strap for lashing the heavy stuff. They also have a track type slider on the back side for moving things on stairs. I would rent one of these rather than buy it, as I assume they are very spendy and not as useful for other things.

One of the things to consider on moving furniture is if there is structure close to ground level that a cart can get hold on. Things like washers and driers have sheet metal cabinet all the way to floor level, and a cart can lift them. Something that has feet on it would need blocking in order for the cart to be able to lift it.
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Old 06-07-2019, 03:17 PM   #4
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We use one similar to the 49180. They make long Velcro straps that wrap around the cart and the item you are moving. Always place a piece of cardboard or a towel between the cart and the piece you are moving. Saves it from scratches.
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Old 06-07-2019, 03:18 PM   #5
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Falling off: Normally I strap the item to the back of the dolly using a ratchet strap. If it is delicate, use appropriate dunnage, a moving blanket, etc. The very heavy duty dollies will incorporate a ratchet strap.

Don't buy a dolly for a day or two of use, rent one from U-Haul or a tool rental store.

If you are going up/down stairs, get a dolly with the appropriate "roller-sliders" on the back

The biggest problem is moving things without a true flat bottom (e.g. with a lip/apron around the edge) . In thse cases, a piece of thick plywood shoved under the item first can help a lot.
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Old 06-07-2019, 03:18 PM   #6
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I think you'd want those tie down straps that Amazon shows on the same page. Look into them a little more to make sure they'd attach to the hand truck you pick.

But do you really need one? I think about if I had to paint here. Obviously you have to empty the cabinets/cases no matter how you move them. Once you do that, can you wiggle it out from the wall a couple of feet needed to get behind to paint the wall? Especially for a long china cabinet, I don't think I'd want to try to move it from the side, and to get at it from the back I'd have it moved far enough out anyway.

This is one of those tricky things with age. In my 20s and 30s, no problem. Now, I'd probably mess up my back.

How about furniture slides? Lift up the corners enough to get these under. Not sure how well they work on carpet, but these say they do. https://www.amazon.com/Furniture-Sli...=1RLWWY77A7GY9
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Old 06-07-2019, 03:23 PM   #7
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For moving large top heavy items short distances I'm not sure a hand truck is what you need. Sounds like "more hands attached to younger bodies" to me. Hand truck or dollies means tilting or lifting pieces which in and of itself is the most of the work and liability of injury. Scooting pieces to allow painting means 2-3 strong healthy people to lift up enough to prevent floor scratching and moving a few feet. Dollies or hand trucks mixed with large pieces you describe means using the same bodies to get onto or tilt onto, and then move. Yeah, can move further more easily but is that necessary? Good luck! I know when we had floors refinished which required EMPTYING the house we paid guys who picked it up and moved it all.
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Old 06-07-2019, 03:26 PM   #8
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I've had an older version of this hand truck for many years, and I haven't been able to break it. https://www.amazon.com/Milwaukee-Tru.../dp/B001K4R39G
It was made in Milwaukee, and the welds don't break.

If I were buying one now, I would seriously consider a model that converts to a four wheel dolly. I'm not sure I would want pneumatic tires, they could be more trouble than they're worth.

Use a ratcheting strap to tie the load to the hand truck, as mentioned in earlier responses.

I think this is an interesting device, but I have no experience with it. https://www.worx.com/aerocart-wheelb...art-wg050.html
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Old 06-07-2019, 04:10 PM   #9
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For moving large top heavy items short distances I'm not sure a hand truck is what you need.

Yes, to lift and move a large bookcase or china cabinet out of the way, consider renting a pair of piano dollies - the type that straps to either side and lifts the object with a foot operated jack onto the wheels.



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Old 06-07-2019, 04:17 PM   #10
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Why is that, and what do you prefer instead?

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I'm not sure I would want pneumatic tires, they could be more trouble than they're worth.

ml[/URL]
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Old 06-07-2019, 04:42 PM   #11
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We have this one. It's big, bulky and heavy, but it works for most things. Hard to get upstairs and the plate is not deep enough or strong enough for the biggest items.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Milwauke...0138/202204469
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Old 06-07-2019, 05:08 PM   #12
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I have a handtruck I LOVE. I know that seems weird - but it's a great tool. traditional Hand-trucks are heavy and hard to maneuver and so in tight spaces you tend to bash into things causing dings and nicks.
Mine has inflatable tires and is made of nylon composite - it's light weight - easy to handle and tough.
Add some straps for moving bulky pieces.

Similar to this one: https://www.amazon.com/Harper-Trucks.../dp/B00BCJZF3U

But this one exactly: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Milwauke...0610/100095316
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Old 06-07-2019, 05:28 PM   #13
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First rule is not to hurt yourself trying to raise something too heavy off the ground. Better to hire someone if it is too much.
+1

Yes, I think the best tool to implement here is your cell phone, which you can use to call some local movers to supply a few strong backs to help you with this job. They can bring their own hand trucks.

But then, this is the internet and I really do not have much concept of how old you are or what your physical limitations are. Just don't forget that we all have limitations. It's hard to realize sometimes that we can't do what we did 20 years ago without hurting ourselves.

I have a hand truck that was very useful to me for all sorts of things back in the day. I got it at Home Depot about 20 years ago. It was great to have back then, but I doubt I will ever use it again.
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Old 06-07-2019, 05:58 PM   #14
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I built a simple dolly using 4 pieces of wood, 4 swivel wheels, and some old carpet for the top to protect pieces while moving. Have had it hanging around for years and it comes in handy occasionally.


+1 to a furniture dolly or two

We bought one at the hardware store for <$20 a couple years ago when we were repainting the interior of our house. Best investment we ever made. We were able to move dressers, an armoire, a treadmill (so heavy!) so much easier than without. Sometimes we added a larger piece of particle board on top if we needed a wider surface for the feet to rest on.
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Old 06-07-2019, 06:30 PM   #15
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Why is that, and what do you prefer instead?
Pneumatic tires can leak, and it's something else I have to maintain. I prefer semi-pneumatic or solid tires for this application.
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Old 06-07-2019, 09:29 PM   #16
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Painters are cheap in Florida have them do the moving !
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Old 06-07-2019, 09:57 PM   #17
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Don't buy a dolly for a day or two of use, rent one from U-Haul or a tool rental store.
^^This^^


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Originally Posted by RunningBum View Post

How about furniture slides? Lift up the corners enough to get these under. Not sure how well they work on carpet, but these say they do. https://www.amazon.com/Furniture-Sli...=1RLWWY77A7GY9
And ^^This^^

Professional painter and friend painted our living room and dining room. Extent of lifting was to get the corner up high enough to get a slider under it. Then he and I slide everything to the middle of the room basically giving him about three feet or so around each wall to work. You get the plastic sliders for carpet and felt sided ones for hard surfaces, like hardwood floors. Plus, with sliding, it was not necessary to unload the two bookshelves and the one large display cabinet. You’d be surprised how easy it is. That doesn’t mean the initial lift is easy, but similar to getting something on a dolly, you can tilt the heavy things just enough to get the sliders under the corners. Once sliding, it is a controlled push that is really quite easy.

Sliders also work for appliances like stoves and washer/dryers. Though most of those have nylon feet so they tend to slide pretty well if you’re on tile. Slider would help you not scratch a hardwood floor.

If I was moving things say out to the garage, I’d rent a movers dolly from U-Hall. Strap it in and they move pretty well, but I’d hire some muscle for appliances. Especially the refrigerator and the washer.
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Old 06-07-2019, 10:54 PM   #18
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Amethyst, you speak my language! A Hand Truck, not "dolly" or "2-wheeler".

I have a late 1970's vintage Sears Craftsmen hand truck, solid tires, one wheel's bearings have been threatening to go for the last 20 or more years, still keeping on!

I move all sorts of stuff with it, like washers, dryers, water heaters, A/C compressor units, whatever. For something like a washer, I put a piece of corrugated cardboard up against the hand truck vertically to protect the washer's paint, then put a doubled-over piece of cardboard on each outer corner of the washer, then tie a yellow poly rope tightly around it high up, going over the cardboard corner protectors.

But Clone brings up a good point - if there is no low-down strong edge you can lift under, not so good. I have used the Home Depot Everbilt brand of "Moveall" sliders to move furniture around in a room, or from room to room if it fits through a doorway. Simple to lift one end, leg, whatever, and slide one under, then repeat. I have sets of the on-carpet type, they also have the hardwood/solid floor type too.

Another totally different method I have used for years on very heavy items or on those that are not too steady, is what could be called the "double cardboard sliding method". This is good if you do not have to go over any thresholds. Lay out a piece or two of reasonably heavy corrugated cardboard on the floor. This will be the track. Lay another piece of cardboard down on the top of the track at one end, this piece will be the slider. Lift up one end of the object a little bit, and get the track and slider as far under as possible. Goal is to push the object on the slider over the track. It's amazing how heavy something can be, and still slide this way. When sliding, push lower down on the object to be slid, this prevents dig-in. I once moved an unboxed 400+ pound A/C unit outside over a lawn by myself using this method.
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Old 06-08-2019, 12:08 AM   #19
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Harbor Freight sells.hand trucks.and.I have.two of.them. I like the blue hand truck with larger wheels that is.often on sale for $39. I also have two furniture dollies that are carpeted.with.4 swivel wheels.

I moved my whole home by myself using dollies.and the hand truck. I only had help with a refrigerator up 2 steps.
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Old 06-08-2019, 07:53 PM   #20
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At the time I simply needed a new wheelbarrow, but then is saw this and realized I also needed a new hand truck. This accomplished both. I have used the heck out of it too...

https://www.worx.com/aerocart-wheelb...art-wg050.html
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