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Old 08-12-2019, 04:51 AM   #21
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Soap nuts sounded interesting, but I assume you have to remove them after the wash cycle or they keep releasing saponins throughout the rinse cycle(s)? They release less in cold water than warm or hot, but it’s still enough to be effective in cold water wash. I’m not keen on having “soap” residue in our clothes even if it’s a natural alternative. That would make washing a little more complicated? I may stick with Method or Persil laundry detergents.
The nuts stay in the machine throughout the full wash/rinse cycles, no need to take them out. They have a 'surfactant' effect that just allows soiling to be released from the fabrics, letting the water take dirt away through the agitation and rinse cycles, they are not a 'soap'. The saponins are a lot less 'caustic' than chemically-based detergents. We wash on low temperature settings [not outright cold] and our clothes come out clean and odour free.

Not attempting to be ecologically-evangelical about this, just offering it up as an alternative to 'standard' laundry methods. .........works for us

Cheers - Mick
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Old 08-12-2019, 04:56 AM   #22
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What if you gathered all the data on wash loads that were either successful (clean clothes!) or not successful (dirty clothes or suds overflow) and created Washcalc, an opensource program that would let you set your preferences for dirt allocation (% of clothes that are really dirty, somewhat dirty, or barely need to be washed) and then run simulations to see how those loads would have fared?
That's an excellent idea!

However many of the pundits on TWC (The Washing Channel) and MarketWash tell me that the future may not be like the past. They say to expect lower cleaning returns going forward, and that relying on backwashing data may not be effective.

Now I don't know who to believe.
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Old 08-12-2019, 06:51 AM   #23
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Easy to be”snarky,/complacent”; about this question right up until one calculates how much waste/environmental impact there is to aquatic pollution when we don’t pay attention to the details. If not us; then who? Kudos to OP for posting.
There is always the cost of making a laundry cleaner, but in terms of their use impact, they go thru the sanitary sewer systems & are biodegradable, so I'm not seeing your beef.
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Old 08-12-2019, 07:06 AM   #24
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I use Tide liquid detergent in my top loader and I almost never go over the first "1" bar in the measuring cap no matter how large the load is. My goal is to have clean clothes without needing to use a second rinse cycle to get the soap out. Since I'm an office worker, I almost never have anything to wash with really ground in dirt and grime, and if I do, I use Spray-n-wash on the tough spots.
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Old 08-12-2019, 10:12 AM   #25
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There is always the cost of making a laundry cleaner, but in terms of their use impact, they go thru the sanitary sewer systems & are biodegradable, so I'm not seeing your beef.
\
As a 40-year veteran of the Facilities Management industry, I have a healthy/unhealthy view of what manufacturers regard as 'biodegradable' products. Indeed, down here in the upside-down southern hemisphere land of Oz, there are currently several high-court cases challenging major corporations on their biodegradable/sustainable marketing claims, notably in regards to 'wet-wipes' and similar supposedly 'biodegradable' products.

With a population of only 25miwwion though, we are a pimple on an elephant's glutious maximas planet-wise, still, every little bit helps

Around the world the incidences of so-called 'fatbergs' are causing major environmental issues and costs to our sewer treatment and disposal systems. https://www.accuweather.com/en/weath...-form/70007157

Our domestic wastes, including laundry processes, feed into the contributory factors. If we can reduce our impacts, we should

Cheers - Mick
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Old 08-12-2019, 10:15 AM   #26
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We currently have a LG top loader, similar to W2R. I only use one pod, or if using liquid, barely cover the bottom of the dispenser. I was told years ago by a repairman who was our fixing our old washer years ago, that only 1-2 Tbsp max was needed, and soap companies told people to use too much. Too much soap gummed up the machine (as he was taking apart our entire machine!) We had the best Sears repairman, seemed to be the same one who came each time, back in the day!
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Old 08-12-2019, 10:32 AM   #27
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There is always the cost of making a laundry cleaner, but in terms of their use impact, they go thru the sanitary sewer systems & are biodegradable, so I'm not seeing your beef.
"Biodegradable" is not a very useful term, IMO, more marketing than science. What does the substance biodegrade into?

I use a concentrated liquid detergent in my (great) Staber washer. It is phosphorous free. The manufacturer says to use 1/2 oz per load (1/2 of a stroke from the convenient pump), and that seems to work fine (I'll pre-treat collars, etc).

I wouldn't be a good candidate for "pods"--I've generally found that things get clean just fine with less than the recommended amount of powder/liquid.

My biggest gripe with most laundry detergent is the fragrances. My daughter uses the regular stuff at her house and if I wash one or two garments worn by my grandson with our regular load, it will stink up everything. That's after a trip through the washer and the dryer. Why do people need to have their clothes smell like something?
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Old 08-12-2019, 12:05 PM   #28
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\
As a 40-year veteran of the Facilities Management industry, I have a healthy/unhealthy view of what manufacturers regard as 'biodegradable' products. Indeed, down here in the upside-down southern hemisphere land of Oz, there are currently several high-court cases challenging major corporations on their biodegradable/sustainable marketing claims, notably in regards to 'wet-wipes' and similar supposedly 'biodegradable' products.

With a population of only 25miwwion though, we are a pimple on an elephant's glutious maximas planet-wise, still, every little bit helps

Around the world the incidences of so-called 'fatbergs' are causing major environmental issues and costs to our sewer treatment and disposal systems. https://www.accuweather.com/en/weath...-form/70007157

Our domestic wastes, including laundry processes, feed into the contributory factors. If we can reduce our impacts, we should

Cheers - Mick
Made my fortune in sewage, water, and solid waste. Biodegradeable? I'm as impressed by claims of biodegradability as I am about "flushable" wet wipes. FWIW, you can CLAIM your socks are flushable, because they are. Just don't expect to not have problems with pipes, pumps, screens, filters, and other processes. But if it can get out the lateral connecting your house to the sewer, I guess it won't be a problem. While I'm at it, if today they invented garbage disposals there'd be an outcry from the wastewater folks trying to outlaw them. They actually tried in Raleigh but the pushback was too much.
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Old 08-12-2019, 12:57 PM   #29
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While I'm at it, if today they invented garbage disposals there'd be an outcry from the wastewater folks trying to outlaw them. They actually tried in Raleigh but the pushback was too much.
+1. I run mine maybe twice a year--it's easier to scrape scraps into the trash can than to try to wash/squeeze them into the disposal. I watched a relative grind/wash down the equivalent of a small turkey over the course of about 5 (loud) minutes, using about 5 gallons of water. I'd like to be his plumber. I don't get it.
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Old 08-12-2019, 01:18 PM   #30
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Old 08-12-2019, 01:39 PM   #31
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Many years ago, TSP, trisodium phosphate, was removed from laundry detergent. Since then, the detergent just doesn't get rinsed from clothes nearly as well. TSP holds dirt in suspension so it can be rinsed away. You can add TSP into your wash, 2tsp to 1/4 cup, and you will notice a difference. Especially with whites. It was removed because it is a sort of fertilizer that causes algae to grow in water. If your water is run off to lakes and streams, that matters. If it goes to a water treatment plant, not so much. If you are on a septic system, it doesn't matter one way or the other.

Lots to read about TSP and laundry detergent if you are interested.

Also, TSP was taken out of dishwashing detergent for same reasons. The main result is that glass gets a milky look to them after a while. It's told that is hard water, but it's just soap not getting rinsed well enough because too much soap is used because TSP was taken off the market in those products. Add 1 tsp to your dishwasher per load and within a few loads, your glasses will once again sparkle and look clear. TSP is available at just about any store that carries cleaning supplies. I get mine from Home Depot, but it's available at Walmart, Amazon, etc. A 1 pound box lasts me about a year or so. Since using it, I now have CLEAN clothes, use a lot less water and detergent to get those clothes clean as well. I also have clean dishes that sparkle.

Cheers!
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Old 08-12-2019, 01:39 PM   #32
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We make our own laundry detergent powder (just made a batch this afternoon). Here's the recipe:

3 cups borax powder
3 cups washing soda powder
2 lbs baking soda (2 small boxes)
1 14.1 oz bar Zote soap
1 cup Oxyclean/Purex bleach alternative powder (optional)

Shred the Zote soap with the food processor shredder disk, then blend until it is little balls smaller than a BB. Pour in the baking soda and blend again. Pour the Zote/baking soda mix and all the other ingredients into a 5 gallon covered bucket and shake to blend it all together. Keep it in 4 quart lidded plastic container.


We use 2-3 TBSP per load in our top load machine. It will last about 90-100 loads. The cost of all the ingredients (at Walmart) is less than $5.00 per batch.
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Old 08-12-2019, 02:00 PM   #33
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A good review of laundry detergents;
https://www.cnet.com/news/the-best-l...id-detergents/


Spoiler alert; Tide HE Turbo Clean wins hands down.
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Old 08-12-2019, 02:08 PM   #34
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A good review of laundry detergents;
https://www.cnet.com/news/the-best-l...id-detergents/


Spoiler alert; Tide HE Turbo Clean wins hands down.
If you're only interested in the most aggressive cleaning and not other attributes FWIW...
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Old 08-12-2019, 02:10 PM   #35
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If you're only interested in the most aggressive cleaning FWIW...

Not sure what that means. I'm interested in my clothes getting clean though. Is there something you know about Tide HE Turbo Clean that is bad for clothes?
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Old 08-12-2019, 02:14 PM   #36
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Pod person here....

I like pods and they work well. They are more expensive than powder and liquid BUT in my household they we actually save dough by using these because the bulk nature of powder and liquid means that my family generally uses too much - they are not careful measurers. The bonus is that I no longer have powder residue in the hoppers or accidentally spilled on the floor. No drippy bottles, etc. Fan.
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Old 08-12-2019, 02:23 PM   #37
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Not sure what that means. I'm interested in my clothes getting clean though. Is there something you know about Tide HE Turbo Clean that is bad for clothes?
Some products, including laundry, are better for the environment (ingredients, packaging, etc.) than others. To be fair, Tide has products that range across the entire spectrum from very good to very bad. There are laundry products that are environmentally friendly, get clothes very clean and cost the same or less than big name laundry products. Not looking to convince anyone either way, FWIW.
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Old 08-12-2019, 03:14 PM   #38
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Some products, including laundry, are better for the environment (ingredients, packaging, etc.) than others. To be fair, Tide has products that range across the entire spectrum from very good to very bad. There are laundry products that are environmentally friendly, get clothes very clean and cost the same or less than big name laundry products. Not looking to convince anyone either way, FWIW.

Oh.
O.K.

Living in California, I'm used to only being allowed to buy the stuff deemed better for the environment anyways.
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Old 08-12-2019, 03:48 PM   #39
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Pod person here....

I like pods and they work well. They are more expensive than powder and liquid BUT in my household they we actually save dough by using these because the bulk nature of powder and liquid means that my family generally uses too much - they are not careful measurers. The bonus is that I no longer have powder residue in the hoppers or accidentally spilled on the floor. No drippy bottles, etc. Fan.
I agree. Less mess, less waste.
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Old 08-12-2019, 03:59 PM   #40
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DW and I limit ourselves to the “free and clear” types of detergent. DW has issues with some of the additives, probably the scents, so we stay away from them.

As for the garbage disposal and the “flushable” wipes, nothing goes down the drain except human waste and toilet paper. I have a garbage disposal, but don’t use it except to drain the sink quicker. Turning it on sucks the water down. None of this is because I’m worried about the environment, though I am, it’s because I’m sure I’d need a plumber sooner than later if I partake in those conveniences. I never believed the wipes were flushable and if you use your garbage disposal, I’m convinced there will be grease build up or at a minimum, food clogging. Biggest problem I have is hair in the shower and that soap build up. Thankfully I use an enzyme product regularly and that seems to keep everything running smooth.
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