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Old 01-24-2016, 10:27 AM   #61
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Now all you have to do is remember the codes.
It is one thing to forget the code and quite another thing to lose the knowledge of what a code is.
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Old 01-24-2016, 10:33 AM   #62
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Don't you find it odd to be thinking of your future self in the third-person? Like you are trying to figure out how to provide for a child. What will future-self want at the far end of life? Will future-self be able to appreciate anything beyond being warm and well-fed?
Using the term "future self" is an interesting idea.

I'm always just planning and trying to imagine ahead a few turns. We don't know where the end of the road is and it might not be 80 but rather 95. Running those backtests (FIRECalc or VPW) can cause one to wonder about the longer term future -- not just money but all the other stuff in life.
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Old 01-24-2016, 10:40 AM   #63
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It will be an interesting experiment with N=7 (my siblings and parents). My parents both died in the mid 80s but neither of them did a lick of exercise and both smoked most of their lives. My father was somewhat debilitated but still lucid up till the end, my mother had a mild cognitive impairment. My two sisters in their mid 80s are both still sharp as tacks and the more athletic of the two is doing great. My 82 yo brother (who also never did a lick of exercise) is showing some cognitive decline although it is hard to separate from general effects of his encroaching blindness. A brother one year older (68) is a runner and in great shape mentally and physically except for aFib (maybe a result of his excess running - marathons).

I dumped 35 pounds a few years back, haven't smoked in 45 years, have good BP and numbers, and exercise regularly...
That is something that really separates many of us from our parents generation. They never intentionally went out to exercise.

And they were exposed to more environmental health hazards -- my Mom smoked a little (died of stomach cancer at 68) and my Dad worked in a Naval shipyard as a mechanic on a nuclear sub (died of myeloma leukemia at 69).
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Old 01-24-2016, 10:51 AM   #64
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At 80, I hope to be able to help my grandchildren with homework if they take up engineering or a science curriculum that requires math.

But I may not be alive then, or not remember the way to the bathroom.
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Old 01-24-2016, 11:21 AM   #65
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No male member of my family on either side ever lived to see 80 so I don't expect to either. If I do, I expect my mental capabilities will be as low as they are now but not worse. Physically, i'll probably be in really bad shape if I get to 80.
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Old 01-24-2016, 11:24 AM   #66
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I just hope to be alive and functional enough not to injure or kill myself out in the yard or in my workshop.


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Old 01-24-2016, 01:21 PM   #67
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Given my historic and current state of health and mental faculties, barring any outlying events, I will be in excellent total health well into my eighties. I don't expect much cognitive decline as research has shown engaging the mind delays mental decline, and I am always working on some (or several) new learning projects. Physically, my diet and exercise regimen are highly supportive of optimum health.
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Old 01-24-2016, 01:58 PM   #68
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Both parents made it to 90 or above. My two grand mothers also made it to well over 90. My grand fathers died relitevly early - late 40's to early 50's. Mostly that was attriubtable to the Depression and WW2, along with no way of treating things like high blood pressure (which so far I show no signs of having).

So, I figure at some point in my early 80's I will put most of my investments in PSSSSSSTT.....Wellesly and collect the dividends to spend on wine, song and my woman.
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Old 01-24-2016, 02:10 PM   #69
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The medications issue that REWahoo mentioned, and the story about dementia after cataract surgery both hit home to me.

My BFF is dealing with this combo of issues right now. Her mom (age 80) was prescribed an additional med by her orthopedist... apparently it reacted badly with the other meds she was on and she passed out and her husband couldn't revive her. 2 days later, at the hospital, she finally wakes up - but is showing full dementia. (Prior to this she was still working as an article editor and making decent $$.). She's been in the hospital for 10 days and they can't figure it out. BFF flew down there yesterday to help her dad deal with it and also to get POA from him so she can pay the bills. (Her mom's job, he's clueless on that stuff.)

Very scary scenario.
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Old 01-24-2016, 02:26 PM   #70
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Now all you have to do is remember the codes.
Good point! F has my code if I forget, but then if we both get loopy at the same time I'd have to use the key that overrides the keypad.


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It is one thing to forget the code and quite another thing to lose the knowledge of what a code is.

I think that at that point, if I don't know what a key is or what a code is, it definitely would be time to call 911 for help.
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Old 01-24-2016, 02:42 PM   #71
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...I think that at that point, if I don't know what a key is or what a code is, it definitely would be time to call 911 for help.
It's for someone else to call 911, you mean? If a person does not know what a key is for (Alzheimer patients can get that bad), how would she know what a telephone is, or know how to work a smart phone? And also what 911 means?

I read a blog of a woman who is taking care of her mother. Her mom went downhill fast in just a few months to the point she forgets what a napkin is for, and tries to eat it.
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Old 01-24-2016, 02:47 PM   #72
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It's for someone else to call 911, you mean? If a person does not know what a key is for (Alzheimer patients can get that bad), how would she know what a telephone is, or know how to work a smart phone? And also what 911 means?
If that suddenly happened to me with no warning, then guess I would just have to randomly run out into the street screaming until somebody did something. But then, what if I didn't know what a street was? Or what screaming was? or running? Or why I cared one way or the other?
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Old 01-24-2016, 02:56 PM   #73
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... why I cared one way or the other?
See, that's how most Alzheimer patients end up being, not caring about anything.

So, party on. You will just care less and less.

PS. People do go gently into the night, despite their intention to not do so.
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Old 01-24-2016, 04:00 PM   #74
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I have 30 years till 80 and I mostly wish to be able to get to the bathroom and know what to do when I get there. Everything else is a bonus.
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Old 01-24-2016, 05:12 PM   #75
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80? If still on the top side, hope am at least as sharp as an ax handle.
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Old 01-24-2016, 06:34 PM   #76
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The medications issue that REWahoo mentioned, and the story about dementia after cataract surgery both hit home to me.

My BFF is dealing with this combo of issues right now. Her mom (age 80) was prescribed an additional med by her orthopedist... apparently it reacted badly with the other meds she was on and she passed out and her husband couldn't revive her. 2 days later, at the hospital, she finally wakes up - but is showing full dementia....

Very scary scenario.
In the case of my grandmother, it was not medication but lack of it. She was in her 70s when it happened. Her dentist wanted her to stop taking her blood thinner for a week before a dental procedure. She had a stroke, and when she came out of unconsciousness, she was not the same, and immediately had problems with recognizing her relatives.

She lived on for a few more years with my mother, but I think she was constantly in fear as she did not recognize anybody and never knew what she was supposed to do. I saw her once acting like a little kid, and begging to be taken home. It was sad.
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Old 01-24-2016, 06:58 PM   #77
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One surprise for me from this thread is how many people found their parents had severe problems due to medications (adding or subracting them).

Sounds like one should be very careful on that front. Thankfully now docs have better computer analysis and in 10 years I'd hope that this sort of thing will be easier to avoid. But it still might be up to the patient to be vigilante and careful with changes.

If someone has an idea for best practices on this issue, let us know here.
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Old 01-24-2016, 07:15 PM   #78
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I have great genes on one side and diabetes on the other. I'm type II diabetic--like 1/2 of my cousins. I no longer drink alcohol and am on an insulin pump which lengthens lifespans 2 years on average.

My father was pretty sharp up thru age 85. I have no idea why my sister let the doctors put him on antidepressants and sleeping pills. He was groggy when the doorbell rang and he got up to answer the door--falling and breaking a hip. My orders are to keep me lucid as long as possible--no unneeded pills.
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Old 01-24-2016, 08:24 PM   #79
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He was groggy when the doorbell rang and he got up to answer the door--falling and breaking a hip.
FWIW, I believe it's pretty common at that age for the expected cause and effect to be reversed. The hip suddenly breaks, causing the fall. More common in women, but it could happen to anyone.
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Old 01-24-2016, 10:30 PM   #80
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It is one thing to forget the code and quite another thing to lose the knowledge of what a code is.
I'm visiting with my son and had to remember the code for the gate. So I thought I'd do some mental gymnastic with 4 numbers. The code was 1306. The numbers 1, 3, 0 and 6 equal to 10 and the number 13 is "bad luck". 6 looks like a "J" backwards. So when you tie it all together, the string is BAD LUCK O.J.

I use to say to my kids, "a short pencil is better than a long memory". I'll be 59 in a couple of months and intend to keep the short pencil in my pocket as long as I can before I have to use it.

Jane Fonda was asked, "How do you maintain your youthfulness?". She answered, "By staying curious".

According to Dick Van Dyke, the secret to staying youthful is to "Keep Moving" (the name of his book).

I am surprised I have this much happiness and contentment at this stage of my life. 80's can wait a little longer, but I'm sure when I get there I hope to find just as much joy in my world.

Wherever you go, make sure to bring your own sunshine.
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