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How to cook fish
Old 10-25-2009, 02:40 PM   #1
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How to cook fish

I got a pile of frozen walleye and steelhead fillets from my cousin. I really don't know much about cooking and even less about cooking fish. Any ideas besides covering in crumbs and frying? I looked on the net and I just can't evaluate how the various recipes would taste, so I am interested in how people like their firsh.
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Old 10-25-2009, 02:47 PM   #2
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I always bake it (salmon and halibut, fillets and steaks). Easier to get it done perfectly, never overdone.

My friend always barbeques it, after a spice rub or marinating. Very tasty, but easier to overcook.
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Old 10-25-2009, 02:49 PM   #3
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Any recipe for salmon will be suitable for steelhead trout. We like ours oven broiled with a light sauce over it. We try a variety of different sauces. If you haven't already looked, try epicurious.com for recipes. The recipes are graded one to four forks and people post comments. Reading the comments of others who have tried the recipes there also should help you determine whether it is something you want to try.
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Old 10-25-2009, 02:52 PM   #4
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I believe the fish fillets you are referring to are on the thin side? If so I would put a splash of white wine on them, maybe some lemon juice, a dab of butter or margarine, a sprinkling of some herbs and bake in a 375 degree oven for twenty minutes or a half an hour or so or until done(flakes easily and cooked in the thickest part). You could also wrap fillets in foil and bake to keep the juices in. I think this would be the easiest thing to do with them and foolproof, too.
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Old 10-25-2009, 03:03 PM   #5
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The walleye are in thin fillets, the steelhead much thicker. I had baked walleye for lunch. It was fine but boring. I'd like some kind of gooey, tasty sauce. I am going through Gumby's link.
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Old 10-25-2009, 03:08 PM   #6
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I particularly like allrecipes.com. You get a particular recipe, then look at (rollover) the various comments for addition information and alternate suggestions. Here's a nice looking (simple and tasty) recipe for the steelhead. http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Barbequ...ut/Detail.aspx
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Old 10-25-2009, 03:13 PM   #7
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Yes, Epicurious.com is a great website. I think Cook's also has a website. I love their magazine. I don't know much about sauces, but I think you could put something like a barbecue sauce or a dollop of salsa on the fillets. I have a grill pan for my gas stove for cooking thicker pieces of fish. I brush it with olive oil and flip when I see grill marks. If I cut it open and it is not quite done enough(for my tastes) in the thickest part, I zap it in the microwave for a minute or two. I will eat tuna fillets a little pink in the middle but not anything else. Our fish here in PA(from the stores) leaves something to be desired from a freshness standpoint IMO. If your fish was caught and frozen right away it is likely of a superior quality.
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Old 10-25-2009, 03:17 PM   #8
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One of the things I love to do with fish is make soup. I usually use the imitation crabmeat (pollock flavored with crab juices), but any sweet white fish will work. Ask your cousin how strongly flavored the fish you received is. Fish must be completely boneless for using in soup.

You'll need very large bowls for serving this soup. Try the dollar store for oversized soup bowls.

Oriental fish soup

Veggies: Slice 1 stalk of celery into 1/4" pieces on a slant. Slice 10 baby or 2 medium whole peeled carrots into 1/2" pieces. Chop 1 small sweet white or yellow onion into rings, then slice into small pieces, OR use 2 fresh scallions if you like a milder onion flavor. Use both types if you love onion.
Fish: Slice fish into 1/2" pieces. Feel for bones and pull out with fingers.
Put raw vegetables and fish into a crockpot. Add 2 medium cans chicken broth plus enough water to cover.
Seasonings: Add a splash (1/4 tsp) of soy sauce. Grind in fresh pepper to taste. Do not add salt. Add a little ground hot red pepper flakes if you like a bit of zing to your soup.
Cook slowly: Turn crockpot to medium setting and cook for 3 hours.
Add 1-2 small cans of drained shiitake or button mushrooms. Cook for another 40 minutes.
Serving options:
1. Precook white rice and allow to cool in frig for several hours before dinner. Place 1/2 cup of rice in deep bowl and ladle soup over it. OR
2. Add broken up cellophane or "vermicelli" size Oriental rice noodles (not ramen) to the hot soup. Do not stir for 5 minutes. Stir gently and test for softness, but do not let them get mushy. Timing is critical.

Serve in huge bowls with crispy rice noodles (out of a can) on top.
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Old 10-25-2009, 03:44 PM   #9
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I love your Oriental fish soup recipe, Freebird. In today's local online paper I saw a recipe for Nantucket Fish Chowder that I sent to my computer at work so I can print a copy tomorrow(I don't have a printer at home). It was a great recipe for using thick chunks of white fish coupled with clams, potatoes and carrots, celery and onions using some smoked ham as a base and also some heavy cream(I will use whole milk). I will likely buy canned clams in clam juice or substitute raw, wild Gulf shrimp as I am not confident about my skills in properly preparing fresh clams in the shell. Heck, if I do all this I will have to invite some co-workers to share it with me but there are always downsides to this....one doesn't eat seafood, one is lactose intolerant, one is allergic to everything under the sun. On second thought, I will cut the recipe in half and eat it alone over several days.
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Old 10-25-2009, 04:03 PM   #10
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When cooking fish I rely very heavily on this book by Mark Bittman. Interestingly, he doesn't mention Walleye in spite of it being the most popular (and best tasting) of all the freshwater fish.

I no longer eat much fish other than Pacific Salmon because of the health risks. I cook filet of Salmon by placing it in a very hot (smoking) pan, skin side down, for two or three minutes and then placing in the oven about four inches under the Broiler for another three minutes or so (until "done") I season with Wasabi mixed with Mayonaisse.

This is, btw, the same method I use with (quality -- t-Bone, New York, etc.) beef steaks except that the pan is one of those ribbed kind. I turn it once before putting under the broiler after turning (90º) and then turn it over once more to finish. (This gives it that cross-hatched appearance.) Yum! As good as from the Grill.

Anyway, recipes:

Walleye:
Let me google that for you

Steelhead (Freshwater Salmon):
Let me google that for you
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Old 10-25-2009, 04:10 PM   #11
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I would be tempted to blacken the steelhead. Get some cajun spices (I like dealing with Penzey's but any will do). Generously shake over the fish, drizzle with peanut oil, and then heat a dry cast iron skillet until it is very hot. Drop the fish on the skillet spice side down and it will be done in a few minutes. Best to do this somewhere well ventated or even outside.

I would second the idea of soup for the walleye. Should make a lovely chowder.
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Old 10-25-2009, 04:14 PM   #12
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I mostly cook salmon when I cook fish. I like teriyaki salmon, I either bake the salmon in teriyaki sauce or pan fry it in the sauce. I sometimes use lemon pepper or cajun seasoning. I either pan fry with a little butter, bake or use a contact grill (George Foreman type) for my fish.
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Old 10-25-2009, 04:15 PM   #13
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Unless the filets are suitable for the grill as with Mahi Mahi or Salmon we do all our fillets such as walleye, tilapia, and many others in the Microwave with a variety of spices and usually white wine. Lemon pepper mix works well. We prefer the mw oven vs. baking in the oven as we can carefully control it in small bursts of power and find it comes out very nice. Again, we never fry fish anymore and sometimes grill it but more often than not improvise with spices and the MW Oven.
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Old 10-25-2009, 04:27 PM   #14
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As mentioned by previous members in this post, I LOVE Mark Bittman's articles in the NYTs. Particularly relished one he posted in the last few months showing his teeny-tiny very basic NYC apartment kitchen. It just goes to show that you don't need big and fancy schmancy. You just have to roll up your sleeves and have a desire to turn out something worthwhile. Cooking really is a labor of love, for friends, family or for yourself. Also Penzey's has the BEST spices. We have a Penzey's here in Pittsburgh in the Strip District(wholesale/retail food center near downtown), and it is always a destination for me when I go food shopping in the Strip. They also do online sales natch.
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Old 10-25-2009, 04:36 PM   #15
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Thanks, lots of good ideas here. I like the idea of walleye chowder but I might have to skip the potatoes. And the wasabi salmon sounds wonderful. When I have salmon around again I'll try that.
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Old 10-25-2009, 04:47 PM   #16
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Thanks, lots of good ideas here. I like the idea of walleye chowder but I might have to skip the potatoes. And the wasabi salmon sounds wonderful. When I have salmon around again I'll try that.

Yeah. the soup is on my "gotta try" list also.

Be sure to use "Wasabi in the Tube" and start about 50/50 Mayo and increase the Wasabi until you find your own personal "take your breath away" effect.
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Old 10-25-2009, 04:48 PM   #17
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Yeah. the soup is on my "gotta try" list also.

Be sure to use "Wasabi in the Tube" and start about 50/50 Mayo and increase the Wasabi until you find your own personal "take your breath away" effect.
Eh, I probably will end up using horseradish because I grow it.
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Old 10-25-2009, 04:54 PM   #18
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Eh, I probably will end up using horseradish because I grow it.
Not the same at all... but I am enthusiatically in favor of your approach anyway. We, too, have waaay too much Horseradish growing-in our garden -- whats the definition of a weed? All that w*rk in preparation, however, is a little off-putting -- "Wasabi in a Tube" is so much more fitting with my lifestyle.
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Old 10-25-2009, 07:54 PM   #19
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This is a delicious recipe that I just love - and it is fool-proof. It will work just as well with the steelhead trout. I've used cashew nuts or pine nuts instead of filberts at times.

KQED: Jacques Pépin: Fast Food My Way: Recipes: Oven-Baked Salmon with Sun-Dried Tomato and Salsa Mayonnaise

In general, Jacque's recipes rock!
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Old 10-25-2009, 08:46 PM   #20
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In general, Jacque's recipes rock!
I concur.
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