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Old 06-03-2016, 11:01 AM   #21
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I'm intrigued by the orange anchors that ERD50 cited. The soil here is heavy clay, so I wonder how difficult they'd be to install? ...
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Clay soil here too (but probably not 'hard clay'), and they went in very easy for me. You can slip a long rod (I think I used a jack handle) through that loop, and they screw right in. Getting the soil moist might help in rock-hard dry clay.

From the reviews, seems the only problem people have is hitting a rock. Unless the rock is very big, just reinserting at a slight angle should be enough to get the point to push the rock out of the way, or move around it.

Note that the loop handle folds flat so a lawn mower won't hit it, yet flips up to tie to, or to help get them installed/removed.

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Old 06-03-2016, 12:05 PM   #22
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Survey grade GPS is, consumer grade is not. Our survey grade was capable of navigating to the head of a nail.....
I concede that you are right but out of 100 posters on this forum how many would have, or have access to a survey grade GPS? My guess is less than one.

Also, from my discussion with my surveyor even the survey grade GPS is not accurate unless there is clear sky above so it is next to useless in the woods or in our situation where the line is adjacent to a large maple tree and next to a cedar hedge. In an open space like you might have for road construction I can see it would be useful.
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Old 06-03-2016, 12:10 PM   #23
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If you truly know where the line is (and it sounds like you do), you would be well withing your rights to ask him to move it. If he refuses, you would be well within your right to remove it and pitch it onto his lot.... so you can tell him that if he doesn't move it by x date that you will remove the portion that encroaches on your property and return it to him... where would he like you to put it? No lawyer required... if it comes to that insist that in addition to remedying the problem that he pay your attorney and court fees.
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Old 06-03-2016, 01:01 PM   #24
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I have six pins for an irregular lot. Four at the back boundary are concrete. Two at the front were set by my surveyor 25 years ago.
Last year a new neighbor, before settlement, started to tell me where the fence was going. She was off by two feet. Would not 'listen as I pointed out the marker with yellow cap. After their survey, fence went up maybe 6 inches short of their line. I guess she learned something.
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Old 06-03-2016, 01:24 PM   #25
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Also, from my discussion with my surveyor even the survey grade GPS is not accurate unless there is clear sky above so it is next to useless in the woods or in our situation where the line is adjacent to a large maple tree and next to a cedar hedge. In an open space like you might have for road construction I can see it would be useful.
Your surveyor is essentially correct. Next to useless in dense woods. But we would have no problem getting an accurate position adjacent to a large tree or cedar hedge.

I don't know if the system we used is available nation wide, but our system is a Trimble VRS. Uses US satellites and Russian Glonass, plus a data link to nearby continuously operating reference stations. So it's getting GPS data from roughly 3 times as many sources as conventional GPS. Can only be used where there is a good cell signal and within the range of the VRS system. It doesn't need much of a window overhead in order to get a good fix, and observation time is a few seconds.

Another possibility - opus static gps solutions, where you run the GPS in static mode on a tripod for 15 minutes - 48 hours and the data file is merged with a government GPS file for the same time frame. Accuracy about an inch. No VRS system or cell data link required. All post processed. Need a bigger window overhead for this option - no Glonass satellites used.

So if I were to go through the trouble of getting GPS coordinates on property stakes, I'd go with one of the above methods. But I'd have to go through it all again when I went to find the stakes. Far easier to just measure a few distances from the stakes to some fixed points - house corners, trees, fences, etc when surveying a single lot. But we normally had GPS coordinates on all of our stakes on projects with more than 10-20 stakes, such as highways, pipelines, entire subdivisions.
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Old 06-03-2016, 02:10 PM   #26
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I wasn't home when the surveyors were here last week. I was just outside poking around the yard and noticed that, in addition to uncovering the corner stakes, they had thoughtfully placed a wood stake right on the property line next to the offending fence. The corner post is clearly 1.25 feet (= 16") on my property.

I spoke to a local attorney about this situation. He mentioned that after 15 years the fenced portion of my land would revert to the neighbors if I do not take any action. As for next steps, I decided that I will politely ask the neighbors to move the fence off my property. If they do not, I will have the attorney send them a letter and see if that motivates them.

(As temping as it would be to rip out the offending section of the fence and dump it in the neighbor's yard , it sounds like too much work. )

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Old 06-03-2016, 03:33 PM   #27
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Sounds like a good plan, Omni.
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Old 06-03-2016, 05:34 PM   #28
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Take a plastic container and cut a hole in the bottom. Dig out around the post and push the container down over the post. Fill the container with concrete flush with the rebar. You may want to drive the rebar down so that it is flush with the ground if it sticks up. The container could be 5-6 inches in diameter or a size of your choosing. Result is visible with little or no hazard.

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Old 06-03-2016, 07:37 PM   #29
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We have six "corners" on our lot and so far I've only found 2 of them. I put a piece of 3 " PVC over the pins with an end cap that sticks up a few inches for visibility. Thanks for the tip about magnetic detectors as I plan to rent one to find the others. I planned to cover them with a stepping stone set flush with ground level to mark the ones in the front yard. I want my neighbors and their contractors to notice them without being an eyesore.


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Old 06-03-2016, 08:24 PM   #30
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Thanks for the tip about magnetic detectors as I plan to rent one to find the others.
The magnetic locators can be a trick to find--few tool rental places carry them. It should have a tube that you "aim" at the ground, not the regular metal detector "flat plate/coil" at the end of a stick.
Happy hunting!
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Old 06-03-2016, 08:32 PM   #31
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This is the type of metal detector that the surveyors use

http://www.allenconstructionequipmen...FQIOaQodLrANhA

Turn it on with one button. Another button for sound frequency. Wave the point of the detector a few inches about the ground. It makes a continuous noise that is higher pitched when above something metal. The deeper the metal, the lesser the pitch. It will pick up the presence of metal to about 3' down.ImageUploadedByEarly Retirement Forum1465007566.029003.jpg


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Old 06-03-2016, 10:42 PM   #32
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Bore a post hole, but no post. Fill with concrete with a good size ferris metal object inside, and a brass tag attached to the top. Then document the gps co ord.

In the city , surveyors often off set the monuments in 18 inches , so fences constructed right on the property line don't damage the survey tag
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Yay! The fence has beeen moved off my property
Old 08-09-2016, 11:54 AM   #33
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Yay! The fence has beeen moved off my property

Three fence guys were here this morning. In 45 minutes they moved the fence off my property.

Wow...there's not much to these things. Basically, they uprooted and replanted the corner post...using one of those post pounder-in thingies. (I couldn't see it, but I could hear it.) All but the end and corner posts are sort of freestanding and supported by the chain-link material. No cement below ground.

This is SE Michigan with lots of freeze-thaw cycles in the winter months. Perhaps a chain link fence (as long as no one is hitting it laterally) is a simple vertical load and doesn't require a solid freeze-proof foundation below grade. Dunno. We'll have to see after a few years.

Anyhoo...here are a few pics. They moved the offending corner post about 8" onto their own property. One photo shows the old post hole, the property stake and the new corner post. (Sorry about the distance shot, not sure why it rotated, as it is right-side up on my screen).

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File Type: jpg Fence relo. distance.jpg (1.17 MB, 24 views)
File Type: jpg fence relo closeup stake and post.jpg (851.0 KB, 22 views)
File Type: jpg fence relo - okd hole, stake, new post.jpg (214.8 KB, 22 views)
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